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    You might not be able to take it even in first year, since they don't like people applying to courses like philosophy which are easier than IR to get into then switching to IR. You might get lucky and get a spot on the IR course, (they might put you on a waiting list or something in case someone drops out). But I wouldn't get your hopes up about studying IR if you come to St Andrews for Philosophy.
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    I'm pretty sure my flatmate applied for philosophy. He's done IR in addition the past 3 semesters and is considering doing the joint degree. I think you'd probably be fine. I know lots of people who take IR and it isn't their first subject, there's something silly like 400 people doing it in 1st year and it's definitely not all of them who actually have signed up to do it as a degree.
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    (Original post by Nat400)
    You might not be able to take it even in first year, since they don't like people applying to courses like philosophy which are easier than IR to get into then switching to IR. You might get lucky and get a spot on the IR course, (they might put you on a waiting list or something in case someone drops out). But I wouldn't get your hopes up about studying IR if you come to St Andrews for Philosophy.
    But surely they can't stop people from choosing a subject which is more difficult to get into as one of their three subjects? For example, I'd also like to choose English which ask for higher grades. I mean not all subjects have the same requirements and I'm pretty sure I'll get at least AAA at a level which is what they want for IR - would it help if I were to get higher grades?

    I'd be happy enough to do philosophy for the full four years and certainly didn't choose it because it was easier to get into, but it is quite disappointing to hear that I might not be able to study any IR at all.

    (Original post by Meteorshower)
    I'm pretty sure my flatmate applied for philosophy. He's done IR in addition the past 3 semesters and is considering doing the joint degree. I think you'd probably be fine. I know lots of people who take IR and it isn't their first subject, there's something silly like 400 people doing it in 1st year and it's definitely not all of them who actually have signed up to do it as a degree.

    That is good to hear! Which year are you in, may I ask? I read something about not being able to take IR in second year at '1000' level, what does that mean exactly?

    Thanks so much to both of you for your responses.
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    (Original post by electric-wars)

    That is good to hear! Which year are you in, may I ask? I read something about not being able to take IR in second year at '1000' level, what does that mean exactly?

    Thanks so much to both of you for your responses.
    I'm in 3rd year.

    1000 level is first year stuff. I'm sure they do turn some people away but it's most likely those without AAA. I'm pretty sure you'd be fine.
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    (Original post by Meteorshower)
    I'm in 3rd year.

    1000 level is first year stuff. I'm sure they do turn some people away but it's most likely those without AAA. I'm pretty sure you'd be fine.
    So I don't understand why they say you can't take 1000 level at second year? Sorry, the whole Scottish system is confusing to me at the moment - I'm sure I'll get used to it if I'm lucky enough to go to St As! I suppose it makes sense that they would want people to have the grades needed to take it as a subject, it's fair enough. Thanks for your help.
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    (Original post by electric-wars)
    So I don't understand why they say you can't take 1000 level at second year? Sorry, the whole Scottish system is confusing to me at the moment - I'm sure I'll get used to it if I'm lucky enough to go to St As! I suppose it makes sense that they would want people to have the grades needed to take it as a subject, it's fair enough. Thanks for your help.
    This means you can't take up IR in second year.
    You can take 1000 level modules in second year

    For example,
    My degree is in Modern History so as long as I take the required 4 modules for this, I can do my degree in it. There are 2 1000 level modules and 2 2000 level modules.
    I did extra modules in Ancient History and IR in the first semester of first year. Then second semester I dropped IR and took up Medieval history. This year I took Ancient and Medieval again but next semester I am dropping them and taking up first year modules instead. Basically, to take modules in second year, you have to have taken the first year modules (usually). So what they are saying is that if you want to take up new modules in second year, you cannot take IR unless you have done it in first year. You cannot take it up as a new module in second year.
    Sorry that this is complicated to explain.

    also, you can do IR as part of your degree, no problem. Yes it is oversubsribed but loadssss of people take it as an extra module every year and I have never once heard of someone being turned down to do this as long as they meet any pre requisites (AAA at A level, can't be part of facualty of science etc. you can find that online). As long as you take all required modules in philosophy and IR, you should be able to go a joint degree.
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    (Original post by Oh-WOW)
    This means you can't take up IR in second year.
    You can take 1000 level modules in second year

    For example,
    My degree is in Modern History so as long as I take the required 4 modules for this, I can do my degree in it. There are 2 1000 level modules and 2 2000 level modules.
    I did extra modules in Ancient History and IR in the first semester of first year. Then second semester I dropped IR and took up Medieval history. This year I took Ancient and Medieval again but next semester I am dropping them and taking up first year modules instead. Basically, to take modules in second year, you have to have taken the first year modules (usually). So what they are saying is that if you want to take up new modules in second year, you cannot take IR unless you have done it in first year. You cannot take it up as a new module in second year.
    Sorry that this is complicated to explain.

    also, you can do IR as part of your degree, no problem. Yes it is oversubsribed but loadssss of people take it as an extra module every year and I have never once heard of someone being turned down to do this as long as they meet any pre requisites (AAA at A level, can't be part of facualty of science etc. you can find that online). As long as you take all required modules in philosophy and IR, you should be able to go a joint degree.

    You have just become my saviour of TSR. Thank you so much for explaining this!
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    hi, I'm an American and I've recently been accepted to read English. I have a few brief questions, and it would be great if someone could answer! Thanks

    1) Do people generally like the English program?
    2) What's the general student attitude regarding work/learning? I'm on the academic side, so would I fit in?
    3) I don't really drink (I don't have a problem with it, I just typically prefer not to). Are there things to do at St Andrews for non-drinkers that aren't completely dull?

    Thanks!
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    Question for a student.
    This may be the most middle class thing I could ask but as St. Andrews is quite far north, is there any opportunity to go up to the mountains and ski?
    Parents lived in Glasgow and used to go very now and then so I'm wondering about whether it's possible.
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    (Original post by Hazzabanana)
    Question for a student.
    This may be the most middle class thing I could ask but as St. Andrews is quite far north, is there any opportunity to go up to the mountains and ski?
    Parents lived in Glasgow and used to go very now and then so I'm wondering about whether it's possible.
    Yes, there's also a snow sports society that'll go on a skiing trip during inter-semester.
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    (Original post by electric-wars)
    I've applied for philosophy and am aware that three subjects are studied at the beginning and then there's the possibility of changing your original course to a joint honours. I'd like to have the possibility of eventually ending up with a joint honours degree in philosophy and international relations, however I know how oversubscribed IR is at Saint Andrew's and have read something about not being able to take it as a subject in the second year, so does this mean that I wouldn't be able to eventually make it part of my degree? I've looked elsewhere online but can't quite work it out.

    Thanks in advance for any response.
    From what I know the department is really oversubscribed and I'm not sure they allow people who didn't apply for it to begin with unto the course. Once you're on it you can take it up to honours (so long as you take pass all the required courses with over 11)
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    I know it's already been discussed, but I'm really curious on how "elitist" St. Andrews is. I do get that it is what you make of it, but are the people difficult to get to know?
    I guess, I'm mainly asking because I've been a bit spoiled in Vienna as it was terribly easy to make friends here whereas I have friends at different universities where it apparently was more difficult because the people seemed a bit cold and unapproachable.

    Maybe I'm getting a bit ahead of myself as I haven't even heard back yet
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    (Original post by perlsh)
    I know it's already been discussed, but I'm really curious on how "elitist" St. Andrews is. I do get that it is what you make of it, but are the people difficult to get to know?
    I guess, I'm mainly asking because I've been a bit spoiled in Vienna as it was terribly easy to make friends here whereas I have friends at different universities where it apparently was more difficult because the people seemed a bit cold and unapproachable.

    Maybe I'm getting a bit ahead of myself as I haven't even heard back yet
    Well I wouldn't say I warm to everyone here but my friends are all lovely people and I certainly found it easy to meet new people. Scottish people are known for being approachable and friendly! I don't think it's down to the university, more just down to individual people.
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    (Original post by perlsh)
    I know it's already been discussed, but I'm really curious on how "elitist" St. Andrews is. I do get that it is what you make of it, but are the people difficult to get to know?
    I guess, I'm mainly asking because I've been a bit spoiled in Vienna as it was terribly easy to make friends here whereas I have friends at different universities where it apparently was more difficult because the people seemed a bit cold and unapproachable.

    Maybe I'm getting a bit ahead of myself as I haven't even heard back yet
    I've made friends here. And I find it usually impossible to get to know people. Though I actually understand what you're saying. I have a couple of friends who were really outgoing in 6th form, but when they went to Uni they've found it hard to find friends. But I'd say St Andrews isn't like that. To be honest, if I can make friends, so can you. Easily.
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    Hi, sorry if this question has been asked a MILLION times, but I'm curious about the social life at St. Andrews?
    I applied because I really really like the course there, and I wouldn't say I'm a massive party animal or anything, but I go out drinking/clubbing quite a lot and I'm not the most studious of people at times. I really want to have a fun university experience and from some reviews I've heard I'm worried this isn't something I'll get at St. Andrews??
    Could someone give me an idea of the social/'going out' scene in St. Andrews??
    Thanks!!
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    (Original post by tiggix)
    Hi, sorry if this question has been asked a MILLION times, but I'm curious about the social life at St. Andrews?
    I applied because I really really like the course there, and I wouldn't say I'm a massive party animal or anything, but I go out drinking/clubbing quite a lot and I'm not the most studious of people at times. I really want to have a fun university experience and from some reviews I've heard I'm worried this isn't something I'll get at St. Andrews??
    Could someone give me an idea of the social/'going out' scene in St. Andrews??
    Thanks!!
    There's loads to do, many of my friends go drinking all the time. Not sure whether Medicine at St Andrews is a good idea though if you're not into studying... :cool:
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    Do most people usually attend the various St. A's balls?
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    (Original post by Sappho)
    There's loads to do, many of my friends go drinking all the time. Not sure whether Medicine at St Andrews is a good idea though if you're not into studying... :cool:
    Thanks for the reply!
    No don't get me wrong I do enjoy studying... But I need to be able to let my hair down at times too!
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    (Original post by DisappearLikeSmoke)
    Do most people usually attend the various St. A's balls?
    I'm a first year, it seems like most first years make an effort to go to at least one or two. It's definitely worth going once and then you can see if you like it or not.
    Personally, I reaaally enjoyed the Christmas Ball Thought it was much better than Opening ball.
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    Do you have to empty your room at Christmas and Easter when staying in university accommodation?
 
 
 
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