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    Hi, I'm wanting to apply next year (2018 entry) for a Joint Honours in English and French but I'm a bit confused about the Scottish sub-honours/modular system. Would I have to take 3 subjects in my first two years, and then only properly specialise in 2 in my final years, or could I study only English and French right from the outset? Thanks for any replies.
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    Hi! I'm going to be studying chemistry from September and I've received an offer for MChem. I was hoping to switch to the degree with a year's work placement, but looking at the financial side, I'm feeling a bit confused! So SAAS says they only pay half of your tuition fees....are you expected to pay the other half or is it not necessary since you are not actually at the university? Also SAAS no longer pay any bursaries that year, does the uni still pay scholarships? I am attempting to have no loan throughout university, so do you think my wages would cover my rent?
    Also, what do you do for your fourth year if you are not on a placement? How does applying to placements work?

    Sorry for the millions of questions and thanks in advance!
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    (Original post by whycantwerun)
    Hi, I'm wanting to apply next year (2018 entry) for a Joint Honours in English and French but I'm a bit confused about the Scottish sub-honours/modular system. Would I have to take 3 subjects in my first two years, and then only properly specialise in 2 in my final years, or could I study only English and French right from the outset? Thanks for any replies.
    That's right, you would take English, French, and another subject for the first two years, and then just English and French for the final two. The third subject doesn't have to be the same in each of the first two years; for example I studied modern history and German, with Italian in 1st year and ancient history in 2nd year.

    This system means that you can change your degree to single honours English, single honours French, or even single honours "third subject" (or a combination of these subjects) before you go into the final two years.
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    (Original post by ispyjonnytriff)
    That's right, you would take English, French, and another subject for the first two years, and then just English and French for the final two. The third subject doesn't have to be the same in each of the first two years; for example I studied modern history and German, with Italian in 1st year and ancient history in 2nd year.

    This system means that you can change your degree to single honours English, single honours French, or even single honours "third subject" (or a combination of these subjects) before you go into the final two years.
    Right so I essentially would have to take a 3rd subject, even if I didn't necessarily want to? Or is it just say a few modules from a different subject? Thanks for your reply! 🙂
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    (Original post by whycantwerun)
    Right so I essentially would have to take a 3rd subject, even if I didn't necessarily want to? Or is it just say a few modules from a different subject? Thanks for your reply! 🙂
    It's probably easiest to explain it in terms of credits:

    You take 120 credits per year, which in the first two years is equivalent to 40 credits per subject. So you would have to take 40 credits per year from subjects outside of English and French (which together make 80). As modules in the first two years are (for the most part) 20 credits each, that would be two non-English/French modules per year.

    So you don't necessarily have to "take" a third subject in the sense of studying a single thing for two years, but can make up the extra credits from a selection of subjects which are available to you.

    I should add that because English and French only offer 40 credits-worth of subhonours modules per year anyway, it's not possible to get up to 120 credits just by taking these subjects (as you would only have 80).

    [well I thought it would be the easiest way to explain it....]
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    (Original post by ispyjonnytriff)


    I should add that because English and French only offer 40 credits-worth of subhonours modules per year anyway, it's not possible to get up to 120 credits just by taking these subjects (as you would only have 80).
    I think in second year French actually offers 60 credits worth of modules (FR2201,FR2202,FR2203,FR2204,FR2 205 and FR2206 all worth 10 credit each). So in second year you could get 100 of your credits from just English and French, and you'd only need to find 20 from elsewhere.
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    (Original post by la_banane_verte)
    I think in second year French actually offers 60 credits worth of modules (FR2201,FR2202,FR2203,FR2204,FR2 205 and FR2206 all worth 10 credit each). So in second year you could get 100 of your credits from just English and French, and you'd only need to find 20 from elsewhere.
    Okay, thanks very much for both your responses! That makes sense, I'll look into modules then!
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    (Original post by CN2)
    Hi! I'm going to be studying chemistry from September and I've received an offer for MChem. I was hoping to switch to the degree with a year's work placement, but looking at the financial side, I'm feeling a bit confused! So SAAS says they only pay half of your tuition fees....are you expected to pay the other half or is it not necessary since you are not actually at the university? Also SAAS no longer pay any bursaries that year, does the uni still pay scholarships? I am attempting to have no loan throughout university, so do you think my wages would cover my rent?
    Also, what do you do for your fourth year if you are not on a placement? How does applying to placements work?

    Sorry for the millions of questions and thanks in advance!
    When I did the placement year I was liable for half the fees as well, and I had to cover them out of my salary, which in 2011/12 was £16,500. Where you are based affects your living costs, but I found it manageable.

    If you aren't on placement (as most aren't), you will carry on with a course of lectures as normal, and carry out a research project with in an academic group. Applying for placement is much like applying to graduate jobs, consisting of application forms, interviews and possible assessment centres as well. I would strongly recommend it as it does help you to see the relevance of the subject a lot better and raise your employability going forward.

    The hardest part was actually managing the distance learning material you are required to submit assignments for. Doing that after a full day's work was pretty tough!


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    (Original post by Midlander)
    When I did the placement year I was liable for half the fees as well, and I had to cover them out of my salary, which in 2011/12 was £16,500. Where you are based affects your living costs, but I found it manageable.

    If you aren't on placement (as most aren't), you will carry on with a course of lectures as normal, and carry out a research project with in an academic group. Applying for placement is much like applying to graduate jobs, consisting of application forms, interviews and possible assessment centres as well. I would strongly recommend it as it does help you to see the relevance of the subject a lot better and raise your employability going forward.

    The hardest part was actually managing the distance learning material you are required to submit assignments for. Doing that after a full day's work was pretty tough!


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    Thank you so much for your reply! That's good to know, do you happen to remember the amount you had to pay towards fees? Where did you go for your placement. And that's good, the salary should cover it then.

    So if I don't do the placement and instead do research, what would I do in my fifth year? Would I miss out on the research aspect? Sorry for the questions again! It does sound really interesting though, and it would be great to have experience like that before leaving uni!

    How much distance learning is there? I can imagine that part would not be fun!

    Thanks again for your reply!
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    (Original post by CN2)
    Thank you so much for your reply! That's good to know, do you happen to remember the amount you had to pay towards fees? Where did you go for your placement. And that's good, the salary should cover it then.

    So if I don't do the placement and instead do research, what would I do in my fifth year? Would I miss out on the research aspect? Sorry for the questions again! It does sound really interesting though, and it would be great to have experience like that before leaving uni!

    How much distance learning is there? I can imagine that part would not be fun!

    Thanks again for your reply!
    5th year is also a research project carried out alongside taught lecture courses. You are given at least 2 days of no lectures to spend in the research side, though you are encouraged to do more if you can. You are expected to produce work of a higher standard in the 5th year project, but you will leave with academic research experience as well as industry.

    In the distance learning you are sent bumper packs of lecture notes for physical/organic/inorganic. You use these notes to teach yourself the material and then submit assignments electronically. It is about 30 credits out of 120 for the year. The uni also assigns an academic to you while you are on placement and they come out to visit every semester and moderate the marks awarded to you by your placement supervisor. In my case my supervisor actually argued for a higher mark, but it can often be the other way round.

    I did also go on to do PhD work at St As as well and although I left over a year ago am happy to answer questions on that too.


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    (Original post by Midlander)
    5th year is also a research project carried out alongside taught lecture courses. You are given at least 2 days of no lectures to spend in the research side, though you are encouraged to do more if you can. You are expected to produce work of a higher standard in the 5th year project, but you will leave with academic research experience as well as industry.

    In the distance learning you are sent bumper packs of lecture notes for physical/organic/inorganic. You use these notes to teach yourself the material and then submit assignments electronically. It is about 30 credits out of 120 for the year. The uni also assigns an academic to you while you are on placement and they come out to visit every semester and moderate the marks awarded to you by your placement supervisor. In my case my supervisor actually argued for a higher mark, but it can often be the other way round.

    I did also go on to do PhD work at St As as well and although I left over a year ago am happy to answer questions on that too.


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    That's great! Thank you! I think the industrial placement sounds like great experience to have, I think I'll definitely go for it. Do you apply for lots of placements and then pick one?

    Oh wow! Which broad area did you do your PhD in (organic, inorganic, physical)? Since I'm only starting out I'm not certain what I want to do after uni but I at the moment I can see it being research related.
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    (Original post by whycantwerun)
    Hi, I'm wanting to apply next year (2018 entry) for a Joint Honours in English and French but I'm a bit confused about the Scottish sub-honours/modular system. Would I have to take 3 subjects in my first two years, and then only properly specialise in 2 in my final years, or could I study only English and French right from the outset? Thanks for any replies.
    As long as you take the required modules for your degree programme you can take any other modules to fill the rest of the credits left over. These can be modules from your course or other subjects, it's up to you. Bear in mind that if you change your degree later down the road you will need to check that you've taken the required modules for it otherwise they might not let you....so something to bear in mind when selecting modules.
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    Hi, I am looking to apply to study Physics Second Year Direct Entry in 2018. It looks like the direct entry students settle in fine academically from the looks of other forum posts but what about in terms of social life? Is it hard to make friends? Do you have to live out in your first year if you are a direct entry student? Do you feel out of place with the others having known each other for a year?

    Thanks in advance.
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    Hi all,

    I was just wondering if I applied to St Andrew's with one of my friends, doing a different degree to me, is there any way we could get a shared student accommodation together? Providing we both applied at the same time and for the same type of accommodation. We would like to stay in a student accommodation and were wondering if this allocation was just random or we could get put in the same flat.

    On a different note, is there anything specific they would ask for from someone applying for maths/astrophysics?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by ChildOfTheMist)
    Hi, I am looking to apply to study Physics Second Year Direct Entry in 2018. It looks like the direct entry students settle in fine academically from the looks of other forum posts but what about in terms of social life? Is it hard to make friends? Do you have to live out in your first year if you are a direct entry student? Do you feel out of place with the others having known each other for a year?

    Thanks in advance.
    I don't think it's any different making friends as a direct second year entry as compared to a first year entry! All the freshers live in university managed accommodations (as long as you apply before the deadline). I can't comment on the other parts of your questions as I wasn't 2nd year entry, but I have friends who did 2nd year entry and they've made loads of friends and have settled in fine

    (Original post by kathschof1)
    Hi all,

    I was just wondering if I applied to St Andrew's with one of my friends, doing a different degree to me, is there any way we could get a shared student accommodation together? Providing we both applied at the same time and for the same type of accommodation. We would like to stay in a student accommodation and were wondering if this allocation was just random or we could get put in the same flat.

    On a different note, is there anything specific they would ask for from someone applying for maths/astrophysics?

    Thanks
    You could try emailing the Accommodations Office at St Andrews to ask, I think I remember there being the option to leave some kind of comment/feedback on your Accommodation Application form so it may be possible. I think your chances of living together with your flatmate will be higher if you chose to live in self-catered en-suite accommodation (i.e. in ABH or DRA) as there are more rooms available at these options than in the older catered halls.
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    (Original post by ChildOfTheMist)
    Hi, I am looking to apply to study Physics Second Year Direct Entry in 2018. It looks like the direct entry students settle in fine academically from the looks of other forum posts but what about in terms of social life? Is it hard to make friends? Do you have to live out in your first year if you are a direct entry student? Do you feel out of place with the others having known each other for a year?

    Thanks in advance.
    Hi, I was a direct second year computer science student. All students are guaranteed hall accommodation for their first year in uni, even if it's year 2 (for direct entrants). Our group of direct entrants is close so we have each other. But we made friends outside of the group as well, with other people on the course and with people living in the same accommodation. Also joining societies helps regardless of what year you're in. Good luck!
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    Hey are there any astrophysicists in St Andrew how could tell me about the course? whats grades they got to get in? how many scottish and english astrophysicists are there in the course?
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    This is a really stupid question but does the photo you provide on your accommodation form go on your student card??
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    Hello. I just accepted an offer of postgraduate study starting September 2017.

    I'm quite late in applying so I have missed the visiting days and therefore haven't had a chance to view accommodation.

    I would like to make a visit to the university if possible to view it, but in the meantime could any current postgrads give me any opinions on postgrad accommodation?

    There's a lot to think about. Ideally I would like to spend as little money as possible as I'm funding myself entirely, also proximity to the arts building is also going to be a major advantage. I'm also a fairly quiet student, I don't go out much, don't drink and would rather not be kept up at night by noisy undergrads, I would also prefer self catered as I like to keep to my own schedule and I can be picky, but I could be open to catered if people have had a good experience.

    So far my attention has been taken by:

    Fife Park (+ new, + good facilities + close to sports centre for fencing; - undergrads, - distance from uni, - could be noisy)

    St. Gregory's and 3, Gregory Place (+ close to the uni, + sea view, , + probably quiet, - doesn't include utilities, - older could mean poorer condition)


    Agnes Blackadder (+ looks like good facilities especially study space, + cheap, + close to sports centre again, - undergrads, - could be noisy, - distance from uni, - construction work)

    I'm also a little confused there because Agnes Blackadder is not listed on the postgraduate accommodation page, but it is listed on the postgraduate accommodation fees comparison table.

    So I would be really grateful to get any info you can give me - what has your experience been and what would you recommend?

    Did you choose to live far out and regret having to slog bricky books across the city, or is it worth the daily cycle? Also if you stay in accommodation that doesn't include utilities, what roughly does the utilities cost come to per month/week?

    Thanks.

    (Sorry for the long post)
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    (Original post by A VII J P)
    Hello. I just accepted an offer of postgraduate study starting September 2017.

    I'm quite late in applying so I have missed the visiting days and therefore haven't had a chance to view accommodation.

    I would like to make a visit to the university if possible to view it, but in the meantime could any current postgrads give me any opinions on postgrad accommodation?

    There's a lot to think about. Ideally I would like to spend as little money as possible as I'm funding myself entirely, also proximity to the arts building is also going to be a major advantage. I'm also a fairly quiet student, I don't go out much, don't drink and would rather not be kept up at night by noisy undergrads, I would also prefer self catered as I like to keep to my own schedule and I can be picky, but I could be open to catered if people have had a good experience.

    So far my attention has been taken by:

    Fife Park (+ new, + good facilities + close to sports centre for fencing; - undergrads, - distance from uni, - could be noisy)

    St. Gregory's and 3, Gregory Place (+ close to the uni, + sea view, , + probably quiet, - doesn't include utilities, - older could mean poorer condition)


    Agnes Blackadder (+ looks like good facilities especially study space, + cheap, + close to sports centre again, - undergrads, - could be noisy, - distance from uni, - construction work)

    I'm also a little confused there because Agnes Blackadder is not listed on the postgraduate accommodation page, but it is listed on the postgraduate accommodation fees comparison table.

    So I would be really grateful to get any info you can give me - what has your experience been and what would you recommend?

    Did you choose to live far out and regret having to slog bricky books across the city, or is it worth the daily cycle? Also if you stay in accommodation that doesn't include utilities, what roughly does the utilities cost come to per month/week?

    Thanks.

    (Sorry for the long post)
    I'm not a current postgrad and I've never lived in the postgrad-only accommodation so I can't tell you what it's like, but it sounds like you might prefer it, and it would definitely be closer to arts buildings.

    Agnes Blackadder is mostly undergrads and will probably be noisier than you would like.

    Quite a few postgrads live in DRA and Fife Park - it will be quieter as you get a separate flat/house and they usually put you in with similar students, so you would probably be living with other postgrads (you may also be able to request this). Fife Park is further out than DRA and is still a fair walk from the gym, but lots of people cycle and it doesn't take long getting anywhere in St Andrews on a bike.
 
 
 
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