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    As part of my AS level combination, I take History and English. One of the issues that my teachers have said I need to be less narrative and more analytical. I know what each of these words mean and my teachers have said I need to show a deeper level of understanding. It might be clearer if I hear it from a student perspective, so perhaps you can help.

    Many thanks
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    In short, less talking about the story/event and more insight into what the words/events mean.
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    Yep. Avoid simply describing.
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    Yes, don't write out the story in your words, the examiner would know that. Focus on meanings of words, how certain parts of the story are portrayed ..
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    Well i think its differnt for each subject

    For history... don't just tell the examiner what happened... tell them how that event/fact relates to the question... analyse how important it was as an event for the question... or to what extent it did what the question is asking etc.

    For english... the examiner has read the book... they dont want to know what happens... tell them a short fact and maybe explain it, but then make sure you show how it relates to the question...so analyse why it does something for the character or whatever (depends on the question)

    Always remember to PEE

    P - Make a POINT

    E - EXPLAIN your point

    E - EVALUATE the point (give reasons why it relates to the question and what effect it has)
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    (Original post by LawHopeful)
    Well i think its differnt for each subject

    For history... don't just tell the examiner what happened... tell them how that event/fact relates to the question... analyse how important it was as an event for the question... or to what extent it did what the question is asking etc.

    For english... the examiner has read the book... they dont want to know what happens... tell them a short fact and maybe explain it, but then make sure you show how it relates to the question...so analyse why it does something for the character or whatever (depends on the question)

    Always remember to PEE

    P - Make a POINT

    E - EXPLAIN your point

    E - EVALUATE the point (give reasons why it relates to the question and what effect it has)
    when PEE ing

    rember to include short RELEVANT quotes
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    (Original post by Niaya)
    when PEE ing

    rember to include short RELEVANT quotes
    Only in english... i dont think that's necessary in History... ive never included quotes in history.. ever.
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    (Original post by LawHopeful)
    Only in english... i dont think that's necessary in History... ive never included quotes in history.. ever.
    I dont no because I didnt take history - I used quotes in English, Drama and RS

    I just thought I'd make the point that quotes are good to back up your point as long as they are relevant
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    I think you're free to ramble somewhat in English (at least at GCSE) as long as you don't lack too much focus on the revelvant information. However, my main problem in History GCSE is being short and sharp, something which gave me an even greater hatred of coursework word limits... :mad:
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    I haven't taken A Level History, only GCSEs. For History and English, I think what helps my answers the most is to keep them very structured. Usually, I'll list off the points I'll be talking about in my introductory paragraph, then devote one paragraph each to a point (or sometimes I'll talk about two points in the same paragraph when I'm comparing them). In each paragraph, do the PEE thing. Try not to make paragraphs unnecessarily huge or just a two-line statement. This way, I know if I've written too much or too little for each point, and I don't ramble as much as when I've got nothing to say. Probably because I've already planned out what I'm writing. It's easier for the teacher to mark, as well.
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    (Original post by Flame)
    I haven't taken A Level History, only GCSEs. For History and English, I think what helps my answers the most is to keep them very structured. Usually, I'll list off the points I'll be talking about in my introductory paragraph, then devote one paragraph each to a point (or sometimes I'll talk about two points in the same paragraph when I'm comparing them). In each paragraph, do the PEE thing. Try not to make paragraphs unnecessarily huge or just a two-line statement. This way, I know if I've written too much or too little for each point, and I don't ramble as much as when I've got nothing to say. Probably because I've already planned out what I'm writing. It's easier for the teacher to mark, as well.
    i dont put the points in my intro but i do put them down as a bullet pointed list on a peice of paper so i know i've put everything
 
 
 

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