Sodium Thio with Hcl anyone good enough to answer Watch

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Vaseem
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I predict that the rate of the reaction will be directly proportional to the temperature. When the temperature increases the time taken to react will be shorter therefore the rate of reaction will increase. I predict that if I double the temperature the rate of reaction will double also, this will mean that the time taken to react will be half. If my prediction is correct I will be able to draw a graph almost like this,


i saw this on the net- can any tell me if this is correct or not?
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MC
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(Original post by Vaseem)
I predict that the rate of the reaction will be directly proportional to the temperature. When the temperature increases the time taken to react will be shorter therefore the rate of reaction will increase. I predict that if I double the temperature the rate of reaction will double also, this will mean that the time taken to react will be half. If my prediction is correct I will be able to draw a graph almost like this,


i saw this on the net- can any tell me if this is correct or not?
temperature could also act as an inhibitor.
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Harry Potter
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That's what I said for my coursework, but now I think about it, it doesn't make much sense really. 0 degrees centigrade doesn't mean no heat, it's just the temperature at which water freezes. So if you double the temperature in degrees centigrade from 30 to 60, for example, you're not really doubling the amount of heat (and therefore the number of collisions).

I don't know. It might be true, but it doesn't really make much sense.
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JuniperBlue
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Is this for a GCSE AT1? I think that is right. I'll have a look for my old AT1 now... *elevator hold music*

Ah no, I did concentration, and wrote this:

"I predict that as the concentration of the sodium thiosulphate increases, the rate of reaction will increase, become faster. This can be related to the collision theory; that for a reaction to occur, particles must collide with each other. Due to the energy barrier, only a small percentage of collisions result in a reaction, because only the particles with enough energy to overcome this will react after colliding. The minimum energy needed (to overcome the barrier of minimum energy) is called the activation energy, and this is different for different reactions. If the frequency of collisions is increased, the rate of reaction will increase, yet the percentage of successful collisions remains the same. This can be altered by: increased concentration, pressure, or surface area. Because I am only investigating the effect of varied concentration, I will only explain how the collision theory affects that variable. If the concentration of a solution is increased, there are more reactant particles per unit volume, and this increases the probability of reactant particles colliding with each other, so the rate (of reaction) will be higher.

So, all in all, I think that the higher the concentration of the reactants, the faster the reaction will happen, because if there are a higher concentration of reactant particles in a solution, there will be more successful collisions, so the reaction will occur faster. "

I think we were advised to do concentration, do you have to do temp?
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ThornsnRoses
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(Original post by Vaseem)
I predict that the rate of the reaction will be directly proportional to the temperature. When the temperature increases the time taken to react will be shorter therefore the rate of reaction will increase. I predict that if I double the temperature the rate of reaction will double also, this will mean that the time taken to react will be half. If my prediction is correct I will be able to draw a graph almost like this,

i saw this on the net- can any tell me if this is correct or not?
i dont think its directly proportional...but i cant remember so double check! I remember it gives you a exponential relationship, the graph drawn will not be a straight line. Also the reaction rate is measured using the Arrhenius equation, which is k = Ae – Ea/RT
where: A= constant
Ea = activation energy for the reaction
R = gas constant
T = thermodynamic (absolute) temperature.

...i think you have to mention that. Anyway...im really **** at chemistry so do double check before taking my word for it...

Hope that helps...later!
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