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    Don't believe some of the crap from the Top Gear survey, it's all about preceptions and expectations. That's why you have the S2000 being "more practical" than a C8 and the C8/807/Uylsses having different scores (for more than just customer service).
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    (Original post by AT82)
    Apparantly 13 of the bottom 20 cars of the latest Top Gear reliability survey are French! They are nice cars though, they have great chasis, great engines and good gearboxes, its a shame they are not screwed together properly.

    American cars are more reliabile on their roads becuase they are often used for long distances crusing at 50mph, the engines never really have to do anything. In the UK we are constantly stop starting which is why our cars don't last long as American ones. Once an American car is in the UK they are just as bad as European cars if not worse.
    Probably a great deal of truth in this.

    Still, a million miles is a million miles.
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    (Original post by viviki)
    So true my R reg peugeot cost me a bloody fortune on repairs. my mate got a £300 toyota corolla H reg and didn't have to pay a penny apart from a new tyre and the MOT.
    I wouldn't spend anywhere between £1000 and £5000 on a used car - it's far too much to lose if the car turns out to be a lemon. At least in a £500 car, there's not much to lose and you could probably sell it for parts to cover yout costs.

    I'd never buy a used car over £500 - rather pay the extra and be the first person to rag it around...
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    Simple checks can tell if a car is a lemon anyway, I personaly think there is less risk with a used car becuase at least you get to inspect it before you recieve it. New cars can be duff as well.

    If I was spending more than £1000 on a car I would get an expert opinion and I would do all the usual HPI checks on it.
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    My uncle bought a new VW Golf GTI around 3 years ago, he got the car, a week later the car was sent back to the showroom as it was full of problems. You can still buy a new lemon, the best way to buy a new car is to get one thats a year or so old, this way you don't lost a grand as soon as you drive if off the forecourt and still have a new(ish) car. You could always lease a car for a year if you absoloutley have to have a new one as this will probably cost you less.
    My first car was £450, if I'd of kept it I'm certain that it would have cost me more to keep it running than my current car cost to buy. It needed a new battery, new tyres, new brakes (pads, drums, discs and 2 calipers), the clutch master cylinder went. Im sure more problems would have apperared, my current car cost me £2000, yet has only needed a service every year and a new tyre, nothing else.
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    (Original post by chupacabras)
    My uncle bought a new VW Golf GTI around 3 years ago, he got the car, a week later the car was sent back to the showroom as it was full of problems.
    Exactly, if you buy a new one then you can take it back.

    I'd rather buy a lesser new car than flashier second hand one for the same price.
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    If you buy from a trader then most of the time they will give you a short term warranty, normally 1-3 months. If your buying private then you should be comfortable in your knowledge of what to look for.
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    My dads bought all his cars privately, his latest was a £1600 crappy Escort he bought over 3 years ago, its 10 years old now worth about £600 but its runs like a brand new car even though its approaching 90,000 city miles.
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    Just thought I'd fill you all in on what I got :P

    Contrary to what some people think on here, I ended up getting a mint Vauxhall Corsa 1.2 8 valve, R reg so October 1997.

    It's mint, only done 26k miles in it's 8 year life with one old lady owner from new, back seats never been used and to be honest the car looks a few months old! Drives great too
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    how much?
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    (Original post by AT82)
    Anybody who thinks a sub £1000 car will be nothing but trouble ever likes French cars or dosn't have a clue.
    French cars are bad for reliability. In fact their crap.
    But your comment about anyone thinking that a car for under a K may possibly cause trouble has some mega truth in it. Just because you managed to find a car that can run without incurring mega costs is somewhat a miracle. Welded cars can still run you know. In fact, cars can still run with lots of things wrong with them, it just takes the wrong type of driving and your car is fooked again.

    The point I was trying to make and a debate about, was that a car such as a Lupo Gti can be bought and sold over the period of a year incurring only a minor amount of depreciation. For that you get:
    - A quality car
    - A car that you can presume reliable
    - No worries about going into the deepest countryside 200 miles from home about your car breaking down.
    - A nice and nippy car!

    All of these points you have to worry about when purchasing a car for under a £1000.

    So then, what's it to be? A car thats going to cost you a K for a heap of **** or a car thats going to cost you a K in depreciation over a year that you can feel comfortable knowing that every trip you make, it won't break down.

    So, I'm fully aware or how little money can be spent on a car under a K, but I'm also fully aware of the consequences. That doesn't make me clueless. It makes me wise.
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    But if you do all the checks the car will be fine, my mates car has had less things wrong with it in 9 months than most new cars. It cost £250, it won't loose any more money and it should pass the MOT with ease.

    The same with my dads car, it cost £1600 three years ago and it still runs like new. My late uncle who used to earn £60k a year drove a £500 Rover becuase he did not see the point in anything newer, he traveled all over the country in it, ok it did break down a few times but then thats what Rovers do .
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    Sometimes its not worth doing a Hpi check on a car thats worth £500. Your indirectly paying for what you get.

    For £500 I'd expect tax and Mot for the next 6 months and I would be very happy if I managed to go 6 months without any problems.

    Have you ever seen the cars Top Gear have to purchase for under a K and then test them? They've done 2 test now and all their cars in one way or another have been absolute nightmares. You could argue that they are pushing them to the limits in some areas, but you don't want to be worrying about that.

    Oh - Top Gear on tonight. Health and safet motor inspector is Jeremy's guest tonight for which he admits to holding 9 points. Also - he does the mandatory car race.
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    The difference is top gears don't buy normal cars for under £1k they buy Porches or Volvos for £1.

    I have never seen Top Gear test a real £500 car somthing boring like an M reg Mondeo.
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    The Top Gear cars have been cheap Performance cars, not economy cars. I would certainly trust a £500 Toyota more than a £500 Porsche.

    My '92 Golf was £900 and it has had no breakdowns. Only maintenence things that need to be replaced anyway. Eg brakes and clutch, that was it. Always starts first time.

    It's all about probability. You're more likely to get a heap if it is old and sub-£1000, but not definite. You have to know what to look for. Not just obvious things like does it start okay, run okay, stop okay, without any funny noises.

    Make sure it starts from cold. When you go to see a car, ask them not to start it before you get there. Check the bonnet temp with your hand to make sure it is still cold. Make sure it starts easily the first time and that it doesn't knock for too long immediately after starting. Ideally, it shouldn't knock at all.

    When you start it, let it run sitting there for several minutes while you look around the car. At least 10-20 minutes. Make sure that it doesn't over heat, if it does, there's a problem. After it has been running sitting there, have someone rev it up quickly and watch the exhaust to make sure no smoke comes out.

    Take a magnet with you and test it on various places on the car, if it falls off, it has been in an accident and plastered over. Always take a friend that knows about cars, or they can at least ride behind you when you test drive to make sure it doesn't smoke.

    Check in the boot under the carpet to make sure none of the metal floor is bent. Signs of wrecks.

    Just look at the general appearence of the car, if it looks really well maintained and clean, outside and especially inside, it probably is okay. The outside can be painted to look okay, but no one is going to replace a tired looking interior.

    Check under the bonnet, it should look tidy. Look for any signs of splashing or spraying on the underside of the bonnet or sides of the engine bay. This would show if there's been any overheating or oil leaks.

    Look at the front tyres, not so much for how much tread is present, but if there's irregular tread patterns. Make sure the tread isn't worn on the outside or inside of the tyre. If worn, it has to be evenly or down the middle. If worn down the middle, its only because they over inflated the tyres.

    When you drive it, let go of the wheel temporarily to make sure it doesn't pull to any one side, if the road is mostly flat, the car should go straight ahead.

    Listen when you break that you don't hear a grinding sound. Also, when travelling about 35-40mph, put it in 5th and floor it, make sure that the rpms go up with speed. If the rpms go up and the speed stays about the same, the clutch is bad.

    If it's an automatic, hold the brake and shift from D to R repeatedly and listen. It shouldn't make any loud "clunking" sound. When turning, make sure there is no loud clicking or popping sound coming from the front. This would be blown CV joints.
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    (Original post by walshie)
    So then, what's it to be? A car thats going to cost you a K for a heap of **** or a car thats going to cost you a K in depreciation over a year that you can feel comfortable knowing that every trip you make, it won't break down.

    So, I'm fully aware or how little money can be spent on a car under a K, but I'm also fully aware of the consequences. That doesn't make me clueless. It makes me wise.
    A car for £250 for me, as I know which is better value for money and will cost less in the long run. Yes been there, got the t-shirt and still enjoying the cheap motoring. Have you?

    More fool those who like to pay for depreciation.
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    (Original post by Cortez)
    I paid £1200 for a Citroen Saxo, you might be able to find some cheaper ones. Or theres Renault Clios and Peugot 106's.
    I've just got a P reg Saxo for £500. It was my boyfriend's mates car and he was desperate to get rid of it so he could get another one, hence the cheap price. It's got a few things wrong with it...clutch needs adjusting and the door needs re-welding but other than that it's fine. I can't wait to pass my test and get out in it! :p:
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    (Original post by lil_lee)
    I've just got a P reg Saxo for £500. It was my boyfriend's mates car and he was desperate to get rid of it so he could get another one, hence the cheap price. It's got a few things wrong with it...clutch needs adjusting and the door needs re-welding but other than that it's fine. I can't wait to pass my test and get out in it! :p:
    Looks like you got yourself a bargain

    I had some problems with mine, had a few leaks :rolleyes: but they are ok now.
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    (Original post by Pookie)
    A car for £250 for me, as I know which is better value for money and will cost less in the long run. Yes been there, got the t-shirt and still enjoying the cheap motoring. Have you?

    More fool those who like to pay for depreciation.
    Exactly providing you have done all the checks and it seems fine its free motoring, my mates planning to keep his £250 car for another year and then sell it. Guess how much he will try and sell it for? £300! with the hope of getting £250.

    When cars get that old the age dosn't matter, if the car is in good condition and runs well it will be worth at least £200.

    My dad once paid £5000 for a Punto, 4 years later it was worth £1500 all I can say to that is ouch. His latest car is an Escort he paid £1600, its very comfortable, reasonable fast, reliable its ideal for the price and still worth £800-£1000 three years later.
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    (Original post by Cortez)
    Looks like you got yourself a bargain

    I had some problems with mine, had a few leaks :rolleyes: but they are ok now.
    Well the door is a right pain at the moment!!! You have to push it up as you close it...people around you laugh as you try to fix your door! It looks like it's just hanging on, but it's just the welding along the top...not straight. Can't wait until it's sorted out!!!
 
 
 
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