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Saf!
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#1
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i need to use complicated graphs to raise my geography c/wk grades.....................anyon e know any?????

i'm really desperate!!!
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Rich
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#2
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(Original post by Saf!)
i need to use complicated graphs to raise my geography c/wk grades.....................anyon e know any?????

i'm really desperate!!!
How about:

f(x) = x^(sin(x+ cos(x)) + e^x)

In other words, you might try being a little more specific and not coming across as entirely helpless.
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Ben.S.
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(Original post by rahaydenuk)
How about:

f(x) = x^(sin(x+ cos(x)) + e^x)

In other words, you might try being a little more specific and not coming across as entirely helpless.
She means that they want her to represent her data in a variety of colourful and pointless ways (as is the case with geography). You can get away with just using all of the graph types on Excel (I did) as long as you make some statement to justify your choice.

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cobra
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(Original post by rahaydenuk)
How about:

f(x) = x^(sin(x+ cos(x)) + e^x)

In other words, you might try being a little more specific and not coming across as entirely helpless.
no, i think that

x= (a-b)cost+bcos((a-b)t/b)

Y=(a-b)sint-bsin((a-bt)/b))

would be more useful
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Saf!
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(Original post by rahaydenuk)
How about:

f(x) = x^(sin(x+ cos(x)) + e^x)

In other words, you might try being a little more specific and not coming across as entirely helpless.
sorry! :rolleyes:

o.k...so i've got a few bits of data which collected from questionnaires, like "what age group do u fit into" etc...........i used simple bar graphs and pie charts but i need more complex graphs, but i don't have a clue wot these complex graphs are

....does that help?? :rolleyes:
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Ben.S.
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(Original post by Saf!)
sorry! :rolleyes:

o.k...so i've got a few bits of data which collected from questionnaires, like "what age group do u fit into" etc...........i used simple bar graphs and pie charts but i need more complex graphs, but i don't have a clue wot these complex graphs are

....does that help?? :rolleyes:
Scatter-graphs and area plots. They seem to love acetates as well - get some overlays in!

Ben
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Saf!
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(Original post by Ben.S.)
Scatter-graphs and area plots. They seem to love acetates as well - get some overlays in!

Ben
thanx!..........i'll try those but the problem is didn't ask alot of ppl to answer questionnaire so it might not work........but i'll give it go!
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cobra
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(Original post by Saf!)
thanx!..........i'll try those but the problem is didn't ask alot of ppl to answer questionnaire so it might not work........but i'll give it go!
Make more up, fill them in your self so it shows what you want it to show
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]{ingnik
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(Original post by Saf!)
thanx!..........i'll try those but the problem is didn't ask alot of ppl to answer questionnaire so it might not work........but i'll give it go!
well they cant exactly test you on the authenticity of your questionnaire. make it up girl.
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Saf!
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(Original post by cobra01977)
Make more up, fill them in your self so it shows what you want it to show
gud idea...........never thought of that!
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Ben.S.
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(Original post by Saf!)
thanx!..........i'll try those but the problem is didn't ask alot of ppl to answer questionnaire so it might not work........but i'll give it go!
The thing to realise is that geography coursework is made up of lies upon lies! Make up some results - as long as you do it well, no-one can tell (or really cares). Besides, the marks are really in the analysis. I got 100% on my AS coursework with almost purely fictional data.

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cobra
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(Original post by Saf!)
gud idea...........never thought of that!
Its what i always do i physics coursework when i cant be bothered to repeat the exeriment, i can even fiddle so i get good averages
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elpaw
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how about multivariable vector fields? you can then spend hours of fun working out the div and curl.
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cobra
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I did design last year and we had to study a fire alarm system, i made the whiole thing up about a fictional place, with maps photos and everything, i got the highest A ever in my group, it was all fiction
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Saf!
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(Original post by elpaw)
how about multivariable vector fields? you can then spend hours of fun working out the div and curl.
wot are they?? never heard of them
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nikk
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Enter your data into excel and then run the graph wizard. You can expertiment with that until you get the one you want.
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cobra
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(Original post by elpaw)
how about multivariable vector fields? you can then spend hours of fun working out the div and curl.
If she has trouble with difficult graphs i think not
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Saf!
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(Original post by cobra01977)
I did design last year and we had to study a fire alarm system, i made the whiole thing up about a fictional place, with maps photos and everything, i got the highest A ever in my group, it was all fiction
that's it!.....i'm goin to use my own results in future!.....ii've always thought that i'll get caught!
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elpaw
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(Original post by Saf!)
wot are they?? never heard of them
well, if you have n independent variables, you can plot them on an n-dimensional graph. if these veriables have n associated properties to them which are themselves independent and follow the laws of associativity and commutativity, you can call them vectors, and for each point on your graph you can assign a vector, thus your graph becomes a multidimensional vector field. you can then take the dot and cross products of these vectors with what is called the del opearator (key -- d : partial derivative) (d/dn1, d/dn2, d/dn3, .... d/dnm) where m is the number of independent vector bases n. the dot prduct is called the div of the vectorfield, the cross product is called the curl.
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thefish_uk
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(Original post by rahaydenuk)
How about:

f(x) = x^(sin(x+ cos(x)) + e^x)

In other words, you might try being a little more specific and not coming across as entirely helpless.
Wha!?

That crashed Microsoft Powertoy Calc!!
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