Biology case study help: Can we cure HIV? Watch

A.Keating
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so this is my case study question.

so this is all i have, in theory we could but it would cost alot money supplies and time and instead we could just educate people on the importance of condoms etc and the catholic church would be totally oppposed to it because thy disagree with condoms,

^^ i know it's rubbish but it's a rough paragraph made from my notes. any ideas what i could do? if we were to cure HIV how could we do it? like is there any ideas already?

you'll probaly be like oh why dont you do it yourself, well my answer is because i need YOUR ideas, any catholic's out there that would like to comment on your views on condoms etc...?
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chrislpp
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It's not a case of curing it, it's a case of letting natural selection develop a tolerance for it.

It's already happening, but we still keep the researchers in jobs just because.
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DhobyGhaut
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Condoms aren't 100% effective. Even if they were chances are not everybody would use it properly so HIV would still be about.
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Johnny Luk
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(Original post by A.Keating)
so this is my case study question.

so this is all i have, in theory we could but it would cost alot money supplies and time and instead we could just educate people on the importance of condoms etc and the catholic church would be totally oppposed to it because thy disagree with condoms,

^^ i know it's rubbish but it's a rough paragraph made from my notes. any ideas what i could do? if we were to cure HIV how could we do it? like is there any ideas already?

you'll probaly be like oh why dont you do it yourself, well my answer is because i need YOUR ideas, any catholic's out there that would like to comment on your views on condoms etc...?

Okay well firstly, there is already medicine that can combat HIV, including a effective vaccine, although not at the same potency:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/8272113.stm

Secondly, medicine combating HIV infection is already so effective that life spans are near to average domestic levels helped b the the development of HAART as effective therapy for HIV infection has substantially reduced the death rate

(From the paper: Palella, F. J., Delaney, K. M., Moorman, A. C., Loveless, M. O., Fuhrer, J., Satten, G. A., Aschman, D. J. and Holmberg, S. D. (1998). "Declining morbidity and mortality among patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection". N. Engl. J. Med. 338 (13): 853–860.)

Thirdly yes, I agree condoms and better education is the best way forward in the long term, especially as people live with HIV for longer (and hence can still be effective at transmitting disease.

The catholic church is in a difficult position but recently the Pope seems to have soften his tone, so there is hope yet.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-11804398

Hope this helps, and bless those who have it.
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A.Keating
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(Original post by Johnny Luk)
Okay well firstly, there is already medicine that can combat HIV, including a effective vaccine, although not at the same potency:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/8272113.stm

Secondly, medicine combating HIV infection is already so effective that life spans are near to average domestic levels helped b the the development of HAART as effective therapy for HIV infection has substantially reduced the death rate

(From the paper: Palella, F. J., Delaney, K. M., Moorman, A. C., Loveless, M. O., Fuhrer, J., Satten, G. A., Aschman, D. J. and Holmberg, S. D. (1998). "Declining morbidity and mortality among patients with advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection". N. Engl. J. Med. 338 (13): 853–860.)

Thirdly yes, I agree condoms and better education is the best way forward in the long term, especially as people live with HIV for longer (and hence can still be effective at transmitting disease.

The catholic church is in a difficult position but recently the Pope seems to have soften his tone, so there is hope yet.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-11804398

Hope this helps, and bless those who have it.
what im asking is can we CURE it, not make you live longer. like can we get rid of it once we have it?

i do think sex ed should be compulsary till you leave school (yr 13) because not enough help and advice is given to teens etc, in my whole schooling so far i have had 2 sex ed lesson for about 6 weeks ago with one lesson a week. thats not enough.
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Final Fantasy
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A couple of years ago, there was a news article about a woman in Africa who developed immunity to HIV. I wish I could find this, I'm finding it difficult to believe myself, I remember her picture, if true - evolution at its finest.
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A.Keating
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(Original post by Final Fantasy)
A couple of years ago, there was a news article about a woman in Africa who developed immunity to HIV. I wish I could find this, I'm finding it difficult to believe myself, I remember her picture, if true - evolution at its finest.
yeah i;ve heard about that, it's to do with your dna or the ATCG thing. like people who are lactose intollorant, now i think they must be immune to somthing that people who can have dairy are not immune to. i think it's protiens or something but one protien changed and they are immune to HIV...

probaly made no sence whatso ever, correct me if im wrong on the protien thingy
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Final Fantasy
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(Original post by A.Keating)
yeah i;ve heard about that, it's to do with your dna or the ATCG thing. like people who are lactose intollorant, now i think they must be immune to somthing that people who can have dairy are not immune to. i think it's protiens or something but one protien changed and they are immune to HIV...

probaly made no sence whatso ever, correct me if im wrong on the protien thingy
DNA isn't my area of expertise unfortunately. But, I strongly recommend that for your case study, you do not make any assumptions without citations. Google will be of more help than a library for this, you can search for links regarding HIV and immunity, DNA (+ATCG), lactose intolerance and so on. Cite everything, make conclusions based on those citations and make sure the conclusions you make are also supported by other people (experts/professionals in the relevant field of work).

I think I have found the article, a group of Gambian women developed immunity to HIV.

Link: http://www.accessexcellence.org/WN/S...munity_HIV.php

That should make for an excellent source somewhere in your case study.


Have fun.

EDIT: More here: http://www.google.co.uk/#sclient=psy...207d86176b7919
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Revd. Mike
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There was a paper recently involving stem cell transplants. Google will help you.
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nexttime
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(Original post by chrislpp)
It's not a case of curing it, it's a case of letting natural selection develop a tolerance for it.

It's already happening, but we still keep the researchers in jobs just because.
I'm not sure letting the weak die will cut it for most people.
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wabbajack123
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CCR5-delta 32: HIV Immunity in Humans

Cysteine-cysteine chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor molecule, located in the membranes of white blood cells (WBCs) and nerve cells. In a cell, CCR5 permits the entry of chemokines that signals the inflammatory response to any foreign particles. The gene responsible for coding CCR5 is present in the human chromosome 3. A mutation in this gene called CCR5-delta 32 (involving deletion of 32 base pairs) affects the normal functioning of the CCR5.

In the initial stages of HIV infection, the virus normally enters through CCR5. However, a mutated CCR5 blocks the entry of HIV virus. People carrying homozygous mutated CCR5-delta 32 are resistant to HIV, while heterozygous ones are beneficial, as it slows down the disease progression. Thus, CCR5-delta 32 provides partial or complete immunity to HIV. Similarly, it is a beneficial mutation against other chronic diseases.


i would love to take the credit for this ^^^^ but i just copied and pasted it 10 minutes ago for my biology hmk on beneficial mutations
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chrislpp
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(Original post by Final Fantasy)
A couple of years ago, there was a news article about a woman in Africa who developed immunity to HIV. I wish I could find this, I'm finding it difficult to believe myself, I remember her picture, if true - evolution at its finest.
It wasn't a single case, maybe it was, but we have all heard of it, considering humans are still around we have gotten over many worse diseases and outbreaks and the hard reality is mother nature is the best cure, but to her, we are expendable.
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Final Fantasy
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(Original post by chrislpp)
It wasn't a single case, maybe it was, but we have all heard of it, considering humans are still around we have gotten over many worse diseases and outbreaks and the hard reality is mother nature is the best cure, but to her, we are expendable.
Yeah, see my second post in this thread. I think I found the article I was referring to, a group of Gambian women were discovered to be immune to HIV.
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Jessaay!
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(Original post by A.Keating)
yeah i;ve heard about that, it's to do with your dna or the ATCG thing. like people who are lactose intollorant, now i think they must be immune to somthing that people who can have dairy are not immune to. i think it's protiens or something but one protien changed and they are immune to HIV...

probaly made no sence whatso ever, correct me if im wrong on the protien thingy
I'm not sure how that can be true. The reason lactose intolerant people are lactose intolerant is either a mutation in the enzyme lactase, or their body stops developing lactase. Usually the latter AFAIK and if my memory from our lactose intolerance case study serves me correctly. I also doubt it can be true because the enzymes will be in the digestive system only, surely, therefore there is less interaction with HIV in the blood.
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A.Keating
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(Original post by Final Fantasy)
Yeah, see my second post in this thread. I think I found the article I was referring to, a group of Gambian women were discovered to be immune to HIV.
weren't they prostitutes?
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Final Fantasy
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(Original post by A.Keating)
weren't they prostitutes?
Does it matter? :confused: Even if they were, they can't exactly infect others, since they don't have HIV.
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A.Keating
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(Original post by Final Fantasy)
Does it matter? :confused: Even if they were, they can't exactly infect others, since they don't have HIV.
no i was just saying
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wabbajack123
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(Original post by A.Keating)
no i was just saying
tell me if im wrong here... but even if they are immune, surely they could still be cariers of the HIV virus; therefore as prostitutes they would still be susceptible to passing the virus on... lots
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A.Keating
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(Original post by wabbajack123)
tell me if im wrong here... but even if they are immune, surely they could still be cariers of the HIV virus; therefore as prostitutes they would still be susceptible to passing the virus on... lots
no, if they are immune it meens they have the anti bodies to kill it off as soon as it enters the body, so no they wont be carriers. thats how you become immune to things. virus or whatever entres your body, white blod cells recognise them as invaders and they produce the anti bodies and there after you are immune to that, so you cant catch it nor can you pass it on
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wabbajack123
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(Original post by A.Keating)
no, if they are immune it meens they have the anti bodies to kill it off as soon as it enters the body, so no they wont be carriers. thats how you become immune to things. virus or whatever entres your body, white blod cells recognise them as invaders and they produce the anti bodies and there after you are immune to that, so you cant catch it nor can you pass it on
noooooooooooooo

well yes but not always in the HIV case (not sure about the specific prostitute one) but a mutation in the human DNA means that HIV can no longer enter the white blood cells it infects, due to the protein channel no longer being the same shape I already did a post earlier in the thread explaining this though

ps just covered this in A2 biology
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