Edexcel A2 History "The Challenge of Fascism" help Watch

karema66
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hello

im doing the fourth and final module for history "the challenge of fascism".

well i need to do well on this final module and so if anyone else has done it or knows of it, could you post some practise essays up here as well as any books worth reading, any tips, how to revise!

but most importantly if anyone has practise papers post them please

cheers

hope to hear back
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karema66
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oh yeah and any mark schemes as well please
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ElfManiac
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Mark schemes and sample papers should be on the exam board website.
Because the four-module syllabus is relatively new (I took the old six-module A-levels), there might not be a lot of past papers but they should also have a specimen paper too. If they're not on the website, ask your teacher.

Even if you don't have time to write out full answers, make essay plans. That will get you thinking in terms of 'what is the exam asking?' as much as 'what do I know/not know'.
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karema66
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(Original post by ElfManiac)
Mark schemes and sample papers should be on the exam board website.
Because the four-module syllabus is relatively new (I took the old six-module A-levels), there might not be a lot of past papers but they should also have a specimen paper too. If they're not on the website, ask your teacher.

Even if you don't have time to write out full answers, make essay plans. That will get you thinking in terms of 'what is the exam asking?' as much as 'what do I know/not know'.
thanks but edexcel wont allow students on the website and my teacher wont give me the password

did you do a similar module to this as in british foreign policy, anglo-german, anglo-italian relations.
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ElfManiac
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I did Hitler's rise to power, Mussolini and Stalin (plus Ireland, Liberal Reforms/Suffragettes and Apartheid in South Africa).

If your teacher won't give you the password, ask them to give you some copies of the past papers or mock exams to practise with.

The past papers for the 2008 and 2009 exams (the first of the new syllabus) are available without a password here:

http://www.edexcel.com/I-AM-A/STUDEN...astpapers.aspx

and the mark scheme is there too.

For the most recent ones you'll have to ask your teacher but chances are those will be practise papers used in class anyway.
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karema66
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(Original post by ElfManiac)
I did Hitler's rise to power, Mussolini and Stalin (plus Ireland, Liberal Reforms/Suffragettes and Apartheid in South Africa).

If your teacher won't give you the password, ask them to give you some copies of the past papers or mock exams to practise with.

The past papers for the 2008 and 2009 exams (the first of the new syllabus) are available without a password here:

http://www.edexcel.com/I-AM-A/STUDEN...astpapers.aspx

and the mark scheme is there too.

For the most recent ones you'll have to ask your teacher but chances are those will be practise papers used in class anyway.
Thank you... i have now sifted through all those questions...cheers

hope you are enjoying your time in PARIS

Have you got any tips on essay writing for history especially on source questions as well as essays....????perhaps

Merci
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ElfManiac
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(Original post by karema66)
Thank you... i have now sifted through all those questions...cheers

hope you are enjoying your time in PARIS

Have you got any tips on essay writing for history especially on source questions as well as essays....????perhaps

Merci
Hey, sorry for taking ages to get back to you!

My main advice for history essays - and would probably work for other subjects:

1. Work out what the question is actually asking you. Don't just write everything you know on the general topic area because the highest marks come from being able to apply your knowledge to a particular situation.
Every word in a question is there for a reason.

2. With sources:
If you have several sources, do any of them agree with each other? How reliable are the sources? For reliability checking, think NADSI:
Nature: What kind of source is it?
Author: Who wrote it? What do you know about them? Are they significant to the question?
Date: Is it a contemporary source from the time, or made more recently?
Source: Where did the source come from? (eg newspaper articles)
Information: What does the source tell you? Do the sources agree/corroborate each other, or contrast? What does the source not tell you?
Base your answer upon the sources but in reaching a judgement use your own knowledge of the subject too, to show you are not just taking the sources as fact.

3. Make sure you actually answer the question! Understanding the question is the first step but you need to make sure that you come to some conclusion, even if your conclusion is essentially that there is no clear conclusion you need to show that you have considered the 'sides' to the argument, taken into account the sources if it's a source question, and that you've come to a judgement in the end.
There is rarely a right or wrong answer - you just have to be able to back it up.

For each paragraph, remember PEE - Point, Evidence, Explain. What point are you making? What evidence do you have to support that? How is that point relevant to the question?

Good luck!
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karema66
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(Original post by ElfManiac)
Hey, sorry for taking ages to get back to you!

My main advice for history essays - and would probably work for other subjects:

1. Work out what the question is actually asking you. Don't just write everything you know on the general topic area because the highest marks come from being able to apply your knowledge to a particular situation.
Every word in a question is there for a reason.

2. With sources:
If you have several sources, do any of them agree with each other? How reliable are the sources? For reliability checking, think NADSI:
Nature: What kind of source is it?
Author: Who wrote it? What do you know about them? Are they significant to the question?
Date: Is it a contemporary source from the time, or made more recently?
Source: Where did the source come from? (eg newspaper articles)
Information: What does the source tell you? Do the sources agree/corroborate each other, or contrast? What does the source not tell you?
Base your answer upon the sources but in reaching a judgement use your own knowledge of the subject too, to show you are not just taking the sources as fact.

3. Make sure you actually answer the question! Understanding the question is the first step but you need to make sure that you come to some conclusion, even if your conclusion is essentially that there is no clear conclusion you need to show that you have considered the 'sides' to the argument, taken into account the sources if it's a source question, and that you've come to a judgement in the end.
There is rarely a right or wrong answer - you just have to be able to back it up.

For each paragraph, remember PEE - Point, Evidence, Explain. What point are you making? What evidence do you have to support that? How is that point relevant to the question?

Good luck!
Thank you very much!!!!!
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