Should I put that I have a disability in a job application? Watch

Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#1
In job centre forms etc I always have to tick "yes" because I have a Disability Employment Adviser and am involved with council mental health services even though I don't consider myself disabled.
I am applying for a council job and it says that if you are disabled they will guarantee you an interview, but I don't want them to ask about what is wrong with me because I'm trying to put all that behind me (I have been stable for about 2 months now). Do I have to say I'm disabled, because the council/job centre consider me to be? In other words, if I didn't declare it and got the job, and then I relapsed, would I get into trouble?
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hannah_dru
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#2
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I'd put it down if just in case something ever did happen. Better to be safe than sorry I think.
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sheepy18
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#3
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I have a condition myself, and I sure as hell wouldnt mention it. They may give you an interview so they cant be accused of discrimination, but you wont get the job. If you're stable, just take each day as it comes, and if you get the job and become ill, only tell them then.
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hannah_dru
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You may well get the job, it depends on the condition and the impact they think it might have on the job. I've been fine with jobs and having a disability.
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minxy222
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I don't think you should put it. even though they say youll have an interview, if they know it, even if they dont consciously consider it, stereotypes are usually put into play through unconscious processing. If they offer the job then maybe mention it.
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aarora
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#6
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If you relapse and get into trouble just play it cool and say you weren't aware of what happened, they can't do anything ...
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daisydaffodil
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Don't tell them if you can avoid it - most people I know go through the interview, get the job and then tell them, when they're not in a position to fire you as you can accuse them of discrimination if they do.
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paperclip
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(Original post by daisydaffodil)
Don't tell them if you can avoid it - most people I know go through the interview, get the job and then tell them, when they're not in a position to fire you as you can accuse them of discrimination if they do.
Though most forms have a clause saying that if you lie then you can be dismissed, which legitimises the firing (regardless of whether it's a disability, you've still lied, which, if i were an employer i'd be more concerned about tbh). I'd wait a while before telling them (2 months or so later just say 'oh, i've been diagnosed with xx by the way, just letting you know in case it effects my performance')

I don't think most places will discriminate against disabled people, but unfortunately some will :/
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Ice_Queen
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I never do (though at some point that 'guaranteed interview' will get the best of me and I will tick it anyway), though I'm not stable but I don't count myself as disabled either.

It's up to you really. Whether that interview is worth ticking it :dontknow:
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No Future
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Is it relevant to the job? Will it affect your ability to work in the job?

I wouldn't tick it unless necessary.
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RollerBall
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Is it just me who's sat here thinking WTF @ the fact that by being disabled you're guaranteed interview for a job when you're not if you aren't?
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flying plum
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(Original post by RollerBall)
Is it just me who's sat here thinking WTF @ the fact that by being disabled you're guaranteed interview for a job when you're not if you aren't?
damn those disabled people from being so over-represented in the workplace. who do they think they are, getting all our jobs?

OP - it was my understanding that such questions exist for equality monitoring and for occupational health (i.e. to ensure that you would be able to do the job). if your disability is unlikely to affect your ability to do the job, then I don't think you should feel compelled to disclose it.

however, you might want to consider disclosing it - in theory, it should mean that you are provided with support. i understand your hesitation, however.
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RollerBall
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(Original post by flying plum)
damn those disabled people from being so over-represented in the workplace. who do they think they are, getting all our jobs?

OP - it was my understanding that such questions exist for equality monitoring and for occupational health (i.e. to ensure that you would be able to do the job). if your disability is unlikely to affect your ability to do the job, then I don't think you should feel compelled to disclose it.

however, you might want to consider disclosing it - in theory, it should mean that you are provided with support. i understand your hesitation, however.
Irrelevent. Equality =/= positive discrimination. So what does it matter if XYZ are better to sit a job? If you had an equal representation of every ethnicity, social class and gender we would be up **** creak without a paddle. As difficult as it is to accept, in the current state of affairs not every single person is in the same position to get a job based on socio-economic factors. You should never have to hire a lesser candidate just because of they're disabled. That's discrimination in itself. To not discriminate you have to treat everyone the same, to completely dismiss the other factors. That impossible if you put them on a pedastool.

If a person is best for a job they should get it. Why would we give a foot up to somebody because they're under-represented when they may or may not be the best candidate? The option shouldn't even be on the application form. Putting it there leaves you open to discrimination, positive or otherwise. Why you would ever want to tick it is beyond me. Would you really want to accept a job knowing that you wouldn't have got it if you weren't disabled? You only got that interview because of it?

What the hell even is "equality monitoring"? Oh, you have X too many asian people, quick hire more whites! That's just absurd. You should be hiring the best candidate for the job. It's the entire reasoning why you're not supposed to ask age, gender, ethnicity, home town on job applications and you're discouraged from putting it on your CV.

Occupational health is supposed to be completed after receiving a job offer. Often the offer will be dependent on completing occupational health. Again, to avoid discrimination.
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flying plum
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(Original post by RollerBall)
Irrelevent. Equality =/= positive discrimination. So what does it matter if XYZ are better to sit a job? If you had an equal representation of every ethnicity, social class and gender we would be up **** creak without a paddle. As difficult as it is to accept, in the current state of affairs not every single person is in the same position to get a job based on socio-economic factors. You should never have to hire a lesser candidate just because of they're disabled. That's discrimination in itself. To not discriminate you have to treat everyone the same, to completely dismiss the other factors. That impossible if you put them on a pedastool.
sorry, but I think we are going to have to disagree on this one. where groups have been consistently (and often systematically) discriminated against, it is my opinion that something has to be done to redress the balance. Equality of outcomes vs opportunity is a difficult debate, and I'm not sure we'll persuade each other from either side of the debate.

However, I will say this: I didn't say you should hire a lesser candidate because they fit a specific profile. The point of the 'guaranteed interview' scheme is to try to open the field to disabled candidates. there is often discrimination at the short-listing stage - such as the original poster is nervous about. this counter-acts this.


What the hell even is "equality monitoring"? Oh, you have X too many asian people, quick hire more whites! That's just absurd. You should be hiring the best candidate for the job. It's the entire reasoning why you're not supposed to ask age, gender, ethnicity, home town on job applications and you're discouraged from putting it on your CV.
did you consider that perhaps firms use their EM to reconsider how to target applications from more diverse ethnic groups? Of course they want to hire the best candidates, but if you are getting all your applications from the same ethnic group, you are narrowing your applicant pool, and perhaps missing the best candidates.

Occupational health is supposed to be completed after receiving a job offer. Often the offer will be dependent on completing occupational health. Again, to avoid discrimination.
you are correct. although my experience of occy health is that i've completed the process often months after I've started....!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by RollerBall)
Is it just me who's sat here thinking WTF @ the fact that by being disabled you're guaranteed interview for a job when you're not if you aren't?
It's a government scheme.
http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Disabled...ork/DG_4000314
I don't see how it puts disabled people at any more of an advantage, really. Sure, you get an interview, but if it turns out you're not suitable for the job or there is somebody better applying for the position, you're not going to get the job just because you're disabled. It doesn't mean they will hire somebody BECAUSE they're disabled, it just means they will give them a fair chance and judge them on their skills rather than their limitations in a certain area.
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