Era Of Democracy Watch

Reminisce
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#1
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I am sure that most people are aware of the shift in the balance of power in the Middle East and North Africa. It began in Tunisia with the people rising against the oppressing autocratic dictatorship until the momentum of the political force swept President Ben Ali from power. As you'd imagine, this sent shock-waves through the world and inspired millions more people in various other countries to question their rulers and put their beliefs into action. The next government to fall was Hosni Mubarak's with a particularly widespread unity of the Egyptian people who took on a seemingly impossible task of bringing down the regime that lasted for decades. Against all odds, the millions prevailed, swaying the military to their side...

Sorry about being melodramatic but these past weeks have certainly been unique in our lives. This infectious phenomenon is evidently not dying down as Algeria, Bahrain and Libya are also succumbing to this flood of democratic creeds. I do not believe that the human race had ever seen its citizens so united on one ideology: Democracy.

For how long and to what extent will this event affect humanity? Is this a turning point for our race as the dominoes being to fall in earnest? Is this truly the era of the people?
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john87
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#2
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cool story hansel
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Oswy
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#3
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(Original post by Reminisce)
I am sure that most people are aware of the shift in the balance of power in the Middle East and North Africa. It began in Tunisia with the people rising against the oppressing autocratic dictatorship until the momentum of the political force swept President Ben Ali from power. As you'd imagine, this sent shock-waves through the world and inspired millions more people in various other countries to question their rulers and put their beliefs into action. The next government to fall was Hosni Mubarak's with a particularly widespread unity of the Egyptian people who took on a seemingly impossible task of bringing down the regime that lasted for decades. Against all odds, the millions prevailed, swaying the military to their side...

Sorry about being melodramatic but these past weeks have certainly been unique in our lives. This infectious phenomenon is evidently not dying down as Algeria, Bahrain and Libya are also succumbing to this flood of democratic creeds. I do not believe that the human race had ever seen its citizens so united on one ideology: Democracy.

For how long and to what extent will this event affect humanity? Is this a turning point for our race as the dominoes being to fall in earnest? Is this truly the era of the people?
It will be interesting to see how things have developed in a year from now, new democracies can be very fragile things.
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Anony mouse
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(Original post by Reminisce)
I am sure that most people are aware of the shift in the balance of power in the Middle East and North Africa. It began in Tunisia with the people rising against the oppressing autocratic dictatorship until the momentum of the political force swept President Ben Ali from power. As you'd imagine, this sent shock-waves through the world and inspired millions more people in various other countries to question their rulers and put their beliefs into action. The next government to fall was Hosni Mubarak's with a particularly widespread unity of the Egyptian people who took on a seemingly impossible task of bringing down the regime that lasted for decades. Against all odds, the millions prevailed, swaying the military to their side...

Sorry about being melodramatic but these past weeks have certainly been unique in our lives. This infectious phenomenon is evidently not dying down as Algeria, Bahrain and Libya are also succumbing to this flood of democratic creeds. I do not believe that the human race had ever seen its citizens so united on one ideology: Democracy.

For how long and to what extent will this event affect humanity? Is this a turning point for our race as the dominoes being to fall in earnest? Is this truly the era of the people?
Don't get me wrong. I'm just as intrigued as you are about the recent protests all over the Arab world. But democracy is not really an ideology so much as it is just a form of political organization in which people elect a government. Once democracy is established, there will be much division due to different ideologies with some being Islamic fascism and others being liberalism, although I do remain optimistic that the outcome will be positive on the whole.
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Reminisce
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(Original post by Anony mouse)
Don't get me wrong. I'm just as intrigued as you are about the recent protests all over the Arab world. But democracy is not really an ideology so much as it is just a form of political organization in which people elect a government. Once democracy is established, there will be much division due to different ideologies with some being Islamic fascism and others being liberalism, although I do remain optimistic that the outcome will be positive on the whole.
In some sense, you're right but many perceive democracy, fascism and what not as a belief so it may still be a party/organisation but they personally believe in it as well.
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garethDT
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(Original post by Reminisce)
I am sure that most people are aware of the shift in the balance of power in the Middle East and North Africa. It began in Tunisia with the people rising against the oppressing autocratic dictatorship until the momentum of the political force swept President Ben Ali from power. As you'd imagine, this sent shock-waves through the world and inspired millions more people in various other countries to question their rulers and put their beliefs into action. The next government to fall was Hosni Mubarak's with a particularly widespread unity of the Egyptian people who took on a seemingly impossible task of bringing down the regime that lasted for decades. Against all odds, the millions prevailed, swaying the military to their side...

Sorry about being melodramatic but these past weeks have certainly been unique in our lives. This infectious phenomenon is evidently not dying down as Algeria, Bahrain and Libya are also succumbing to this flood of democratic creeds. I do not believe that the human race had ever seen its citizens so united on one ideology: Democracy.

For how long and to what extent will this event affect humanity? Is this a turning point for our race as the dominoes being to fall in earnest? Is this truly the era of the people?
I agree I think it's a turning point in history but it's not about democracy. Democracy is often made out to be this utopian ideology but it's not. Mubarak was funded by the supposedly democratic USA.

The people were fighting for their freedom, not democracy.
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Reminisce
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#7
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(Original post by garethDT)
I agree I think it's a turning point in history but it's not about democracy. Democracy is often made out to be this utopian ideology but it's not. Mubarak was funded by the supposedly democratic USA.

The people were fighting for their freedom, not democracy.
I am not referring to democracy relative to the west, I know that there are corruptions and variations. I am referring to the original, untainted definition of democracy (as defined by the Oxford Dictionary):

- a system of government by the whole population or all the eligible members of a state , typically through elected representatives:
- a system of parliamentary democracy

Essentially, yes it is about freedom for the people to choose their own rulers.
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Svalir
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#8
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(Original post by Oswy)
It will be interesting to see how things have developed in a year from now, new democracies can be very fragile things.
True, as is a country after revolution. Barely any revolutions in the past have resolved into a free democracy overnight. Most take years, if not decades to conclude. The French Revolution sparked the Reign of Terror and years of political and economic turmoil. The Iranian Revolution was succeeded by Islam extremism. The Russian Revolution to decades of oppressive Communism.

A revolution is not as simple as its etymological appearance, the scars of these Arabian Revolutions will take years to heal, long after the western media coverage peters out.
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