taking lang not studied at gcse for a level?

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Applepie:)
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I know taking a language not sutdied at GCSE for A level is a bit of a risk, a risk that might not be worth taking...Has anyone taken an alevel in a language they have no experience in before?

I was considering taking Spanish A level, never did it in school, and would like to start it. How hard is spanish A level? Maybe if I had a tutor and devoted my summer holidays in to learning it?

what do YOU think?

Thanksss!
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ily_em
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Are you good at languages? My friend has done it but she was always AMAZING at languages, best in the class during GCSE etc. She got one of the highest scores in our college for her Spanish A Level which she started from scratch. Not sure how much extra work she had to put in but as she loves languages and is good at them and committed it was probably quite easy to do.
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Dusty12
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I did French at GCSE and I'm doing it now at AS-Level. In my experience, languages at GCSE are relatively easy and there is a definite jump up at A-Level.
If you really dedicated yourself to learning Spanish from now until the start of your AS's, getting a tutor over the summer, it could be possible. I wouldn't recommend just taking a completely new language up on the first day of 6th form though. I got an A in French GCSE, and it's difficult for me, so I'd imagine it's pretty challenging indeed if you haven't studied the language before. You would need to be extremely dedicated to it.
Maybe another option would be taking a Spanish GCSE alongside your AS-Levels?

I don't know, Hopefully someone with more experience of this will come along and offer better advice. good luck with it anyway!
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no_one001
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You are Charmander.

Brock is Spanish A Level.


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Applepie:)
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lool, i love pokemon! thanks for adding it in with my question!! God bless guys, thankssss! for your inputs
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asparkyn
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I'm doing Spanish A-level at the moment without ever having done the GCSE, and I'm coping alright. Whether or not you've done the GCSE shouldn't be a benchmark to gauge how you'd do in A-level. I've only been learning/speaking/practising Spanish for four months and I love it. I don't think I have a natural affinity for languages at all. When learning a language, the hardest yet most vital thing to do is to keep an open mind. Speak as much as possible, be willing to speak, speak to natives, be ready to accept mistakes and have people laugh at you and such. I've done that for four months, and have improved drastically from knowing only two words, to actually communicating using the language.

There are still a few "basics" that I absolutely loathe in every language and the stuff I never get right (big numbers, dates, basic vocabulary with things like clothing, furniture etc etc.). I'm sure those things are covered in GCSE, but they are not very helpful if you're actually doing A-Level, I find. My teacher went, "Wait, you've taught yourself the imperfect subjunctive and yet you can't tell me your birthday in Spanish?!" I know that there are areas that would have otherwise been covered at GCSE that I may have to catch up on, but it's really not hard at all.

Why am I rambling, haha. In short, go ahead and try the A-level! It won't kill you, I swear.
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Applepie:)
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(Original post by asparkyn)
I'm doing Spanish A-level at the moment without ever having done the GCSE, and I'm coping alright. Whether or not you've done the GCSE shouldn't be a benchmark to gauge how you'd do in A-level. I've only been learning/speaking/practising Spanish for four months and I love it. I don't think I have a natural affinity for languages at all. When learning a language, the hardest yet most vital thing to do is to keep an open mind. Speak as much as possible, be willing to speak, speak to natives, be ready to accept mistakes and have people laugh at you and such. I've done that for four months, and have improved drastically from knowing only two words, to actually communicating using the language.

There are still a few "basics" that I absolutely loathe in every language and the stuff I never get right (big numbers, dates, basic vocabulary with things like clothing, furniture etc etc.). I'm sure those things are covered in GCSE, but they are not very helpful if you're actually doing A-Level, I find. My teacher went, "Wait, you've taught yourself the imperfect subjunctive and yet you can't tell me your birthday in Spanish?!" I know that there are areas that would have otherwise been covered at GCSE that I may have to catch up on, but it's really not hard at all.

Why am I rambling, haha. In short, go ahead and try the A-level! It won't kill you, I swear.
Looool, thank you a first hand experience in exactly what I'm talking about! You understand where I'm coming from though, don't you? Ok so how is it? hows the lessons? on a scale of 1-10 how hard is it? I'm soo scared the options I'm picking are; Geography which I have not studied before, Spanish obvs not studied, and home economics which is apparently a micky subject and sociology or law which I think I'll be ok in! Oh myy primary school kidsss, what I'd do to be u!
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asparkyn
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(Original post by Applepie:))
Looool, thank you a first hand experience in exactly what I'm talking about! You understand where I'm coming from though, don't you? Ok so how is it? hows the lessons? on a scale of 1-10 how hard is it? I'm soo scared the options I'm picking are; Geography which I have not studied before, Spanish obvs not studied, and home economics which is apparently a micky subject and sociology or law which I think I'll be ok in! Oh myy primary school kidsss, what I'd do to be u!

Of course I understand where you're coming from! Learning new subjects in A-levels is really fun (I have three new subjects for AS). The lessons are one-on-one since languages aren't popular in my school. I wouldn't say it's super easy, because it's held in such a way that I learn new things in every lesson as well as reinforcing what I already know. I mean, we don't even follow the textbook! We jumped from object pronouns in one lesson to Spanish numbers in the next and the imperfect subjunctive in the next I like it. It brings a form of randomness that I haven't had th opportunity to enjoy. I'd say ... a 4?

It's all up to you. Obviously I'd be pro-language, but I don't know what your lessons would be like. If you're going to go to a class of 50 fluent speakers of Spanish then you're going to expect a totally different pace in your class. Geography is a pretty good subject, and Sociology and Law are good options as well. My friends taking Sociology and Law are getting a much harder workload than my Spanish though (I just thought I'd put that in)
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Applepie:)
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(Original post by asparkyn)
Of course I understand where you're coming from! Learning new subjects in A-levels is really fun (I have three new subjects for AS). The lessons are one-on-one since languages aren't popular in my school. I wouldn't say it's super easy, because it's held in such a way that I learn new things in every lesson as well as reinforcing what I already know. I mean, we don't even follow the textbook! We jumped from object pronouns in one lesson to Spanish numbers in the next and the imperfect subjunctive in the next I like it. It brings a form of randomness that I haven't had th opportunity to enjoy. I'd say ... a 4?

It's all up to you. Obviously I'd be pro-language, but I don't know what your lessons would be like. If you're going to go to a class of 50 fluent speakers of Spanish then you're going to expect a totally different pace in your class. Geography is a pretty good subject, and Sociology and Law are good options as well. My friends taking Sociology and Law are getting a much harder workload than my Spanish though (I just thought I'd put that in)

Hmmmm, but wouldn't taking four AS subs be hard enough...esp having one that is in another lang! I feel mad for wanting to take this sub ! But it seems so fun!!!!!! Thanks for your optimisticc reply I shall think about this further, hmmmm...I think getting a spanisht tutor for summer will help!
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fcottrell
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Hi im interested in how did you manage to get onto the course? as every college i've looked at requires you to have at least a B in GCSE Spanish for you to do the A-level.
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