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    Are you allowed a graphical calculator for this exam?
    If so, is it a big advantage?
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    Yes, you are allowed one. I'm also doing FP1 and find it helps with the first and last chapters (inequalities and polar coordinates). I find it really helps drawing polar curves and that means you don't have to memorise all the general formula of curves cos you can just plot them and check!
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    Yes, Graphical calculators are allowed in FP1;

    It helped with ....
    Complex numbers
    Summation of series
    Solving quadratics
    Simultaneous Equations
    A bit on matrices.

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    Right thanks
    What model would anyone recommend?
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    If you're hoping to do a maths-related degree don't bother with graphical calculators.

    Some people in my class brag about the fact that they have graphical calculators, yet at the end of the day does it matter? I doubt any of the top 5 performers in my class use graphical calculators.
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    The main time a graphical calculator helped me was in my stats exams, (in the ones that let you) as if you find out how to use them they will do most of the exam for you. It does depend on the board...as I did EdExcel, I cant remember whether I was allowed or not, but I didnt use a graphical calculator for any of the FP exams.
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    Some people in my class brag about the fact that they have graphical calculators, yet at the end of the day does it matter? I doubt any of the top 5 performers in my class use graphical calculators.
    But it does mean you can check things and are guarenteed more marks. Also some can check numerical intergration which is handy, because you don't want one small mistake loosing you 20 marks
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    Most good scientific ones can use numeric integration too...You need to use A calculator, but I found that most of the time graphical ones werent really worth THAT much.
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    (Original post by TomX)
    If you're hoping to do a maths-related degree don't bother with graphical calculators.

    Some people in my class brag about the fact that they have graphical calculators, yet at the end of the day does it matter? I doubt any of the top 5 performers in my class use graphical calculators.
    A graphing calculator is thoroughly recommended for Further maths and indeed a degree.
    i) In the exam it allows you to graph/ check sketches ( polar systems , Hyperbolic functions)
    ii) It allows you to perform laborious tasks like Newton Rhapson with ease
    iii) etc....
    Obviously you should be able to so the above without a GC, but that is completely beside the point.
    When performing mundane tasks like finding the inverse or transpose of a 4 x 4 matrix then it saves rather a lot of time.
    Last, but not least you can programme the calculator ( not for school exams perhaps) and create a useful set of tools, performing procedures that are easy (e.g. solving a cubic), but somewhat time consuming.
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    All that is true...but I thought the topic was about whether you need them for the EXAM. I have one for my degree, and it is handy, but Im not allowed it for any exams.
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    (Original post by Hitonagashi)
    All that is true...but I thought the topic was about whether you need them for the EXAM. I have one for my degree, and it is handy, but Im not allowed it for any exams.
    No the topic was
    "Are you allowed a graphical calculator for this exam?
    If so, is it a big advantage?"

    My points basically refer to the second part of the question
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    Ah, sorry, my mistake. It DOES depend on what type of calculator you get. I could never get my graphical one to do matrices and newton raphson...indeed, it couldnt even handle cosh and sinh, and almost all scientific ones do that.

    If you get one, get a good one
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    (Original post by Hitonagashi)
    Ah, sorry, my mistake. It DOES depend on what type of calculator you get. I could never get my graphical one to do matrices and newton raphson...indeed, it couldnt even handle cosh and sinh, and almost all scientific ones do that.

    If you get one, get a good one
    I tend to use Mathcad quite a lot nowadays, but do still like my trusty texas. Have played around with the casio as well, nice to program. Things have moved along so fast in the last 20 years. When I did maths at uni, we couldnt even compile our own programs, we had to write them, send them off to the computer centre and then pick up the compile results the next day and start tracking bugs!!! damn tedious work..
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    Ouch!...the amount of bugs I find....I would be YEARS doing hello world :p:

    Programming them is fun...but I fell into a trap of writing programs to do the long iterative sequences(such as Newton Raphson) in class, then at the mock not having much idea how to do it, as the calculator had done the work, so I hadnt the practice of everyone else . Didnt make that mistake again, twas rather embarrassing.
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    (Original post by Mrm.)
    A graphing calculator is thoroughly recommended for Further maths and indeed a degree.
    I wouldn't say that they are particularly recommended for a degree. Few maths degrees involve the laborious calculator of integral values to 2 or 3 dp or to give the value of arcsin(0.32) that you might have to do in an A Level exam.

    In 3+ years of doing a maths degree I've used a calculator less than 10 times, because the questions hardly ever require me to work out something numerically. An answer like "ln 5" is left as "ln 5". A solution \frac{\pi^{2}}{6} is left as such. Those answers are exact.

    Infact, all of my exams specifically have written across the front "No calculators allowed", and none of the questions would be any easier even if we were allowed.

    Real mathematicians don't use calculators. It is all algebraic.
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    (Original post by Mrm.)
    A graphing calculator is thoroughly recommended for Further maths and indeed a degree.
    Are you sure about this? All calculators are banned from Warwick Mathematics examinations and I'm sure it will be the same at most other institutions, so they can't be that useful.
    Indeed, the only module in which I've really used a calculator very much in is Statistics.
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    (Original post by Gaz031)
    Indeed, the only module in which I've really used a calculator very much in is Statistics.
    That's why I said "real mathematicians" Stats doesn't count
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    I am only allowed a calculator with a maximum of 2 line display at Nottingham. I fully agree about stats
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    (Original post by AlphaNumeric)
    That's why I said "real mathematicians" Stats doesn't count
    Of course - it's an elective module run by the Statistics department, not Mathematics. Still, it's nice to have a little nostalgia now and again and use those things called 'numbers'.
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    Why?
 
 
 
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