derexel
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I'm currently in a bind right now-My maths isn't necessarily stellar right now, and I had dropped from the lower tier of the advanced class to the upper tier of the normal-paced class. I do admit that I had procrastinated in the first month and had no idea what an (I)GCSE was. I do sorely regret my (lack of) decision regarding that; I could have easily returned to the faster paced-lower tier class if I wanted to (My friend did that earlier on). I'm currently in my 2nd year of the IGCSE.

I'm planning on taking Economics HL in IB next year, but I have heard from my friends that it is of utmost importance to take Maths HL in order to compliment the Economics HL choice, otherwise it would be pointless to pick Economics HL, as most universities would reject you because you are in Maths SL. I have consulted with my teachers and they have said that it would be (very) difficult for someone from the standard class to do Maths HL, but it has been done before.

Exactly how hard is the Maths HL?

Also, would this work? How hard would this be? I'm planning on taking English HL, History HL, and Economics HL right now. The safe option right now is Maths at SL, along with the Language and Science. However, I would like to move Maths to HL to accompany the other 3 HLs, instead of swapping English, History or Economics down to SL, in order to play it safe-in the situation that I would have to (unfortunately) drop Maths HL down to SL.)
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arrowhead
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(Original post by derexel)
Exactly how hard is the Maths HL?
Oh its hard. I took it for one week and dropped it, I didn't need the damn thing. My friend who is now at Stanford studying Maths (you can tell she really loves Maths) is a genius! She got a 6 in Maths HL. My other friend who was more-than-above-average, border-line amazing at Maths was praying to all the Gods in the world before her IB exam for a 4 to scrape through.

(Original post by derexel)
I'm planning on taking English HL, History HL, and Economics HL right now. The safe option right now is Maths at SL, along with the Language and Science. However, I would like to move Maths to HL to accompany the other 3 HLs, instead of swapping English, History or Economics down to SL, in order to play it safe-in the situation that I would have to (unfortunately) drop Maths HL down to SL.)
Well that depends on you and what you want to do. What you've suggested up there is the exact combination I took for IB. But for me Maths never mattered much because I knew I wanted Law and/or History and/or English when I started the IB. If you plan on studying Economics at a really good Uni in the future, then you will need Maths HL. I know at LSE one of their requirements is that you not only have Maths HL but also get a 7 on it for any of their Economics courses. Again if you think you will be studying Economics in the future at Uni, you will need Maths HL.

If, however, you think you need Maths HL to 'complement' Economics HL while doing the IB, I'll disabuse you of that notion right now. I took Economics HL and I got a 7 on it. The IB Economics course is very basic, it has very little to do with actual numbers and more to do with memorising definitions, explanations and the manner of showing the definitions/explanations on graphs. The numbers don't come up unless you take the initiative to introduce them somehow. But even then we tend to use simple number figures as examples to illustrate a point. I like to think I'm good at Maths, but I took SL and I got a 6 on it with a lot of effort put in. At HL level I would've sunk.
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derexel
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(Original post by arrowhead)
Oh its hard. I took it for one week and dropped it, I didn't need the damn thing. My friend who is now at Stanford studying Maths (you can tell she really loves Maths) is a genius! She got a 6 in Maths HL. My other friend who was more-than-above-average, border-line amazing at Maths was praying to all the Gods in the world before her IB exam for a 4 to scrape through.
From reading what you have wrote about Maths HL (As well as other threads on TSR on this.), it seems like it is a really scary and difficult subject, to a certain extent. How would one exactly know if he/she is ready for this 'challenge'?

Well that depends on you and what you want to do. What you've suggested up there is the exact combination I took for IB. But for me Maths never mattered much because I knew I wanted Law and/or History and/or English when I started the IB. If you plan on studying Economics at a really good Uni in the future, then you will need Maths HL. I know at LSE one of their requirements is that you not only have Maths HL but also get a 7 on it for any of their Economics courses. Again if you think you will be studying Economics in the future at Uni, you will need Maths HL.
Well... in my case right now I'm not so sure exactly what I want to do in life for my career, so I'm trying to keep my options open as much as possible. I'm planning on taking Economics HL in IB next year, but if I can't use it at all in University (Oxbridge, LSE, other economics-related universities, ...) because I don't meet the prerequisites for the courses there at school, then it would be quite worthless to take Econs at higher level, wouldn't it?

As you said, and the other people that I've consulted on this topic have all agreed that Maths HL (With a 6 or 7) is definitely required for Economics, Finance, or courses on Business/Management in Uni.

If, however, you think you need Maths HL to 'complement' Economics HL while doing the IB, I'll disabuse you of that notion right now. I took Economics HL and I got a 7 on it. The IB Economics course is very basic, it has very little to do with actual numbers and more to do with memorising definitions, explanations and the manner of showing the definitions/explanations on graphs. The numbers don't come up unless you take the initiative to introduce them somehow. But even then we tend to use simple number figures as examples to illustrate a point. I like to think I'm good at Maths, but I took SL and I got a 6 on it with a lot of effort put in. At HL level I would've sunk.
'Complimenting Economics HL' as in using it for Economics in University.
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arrowhead
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(Original post by derexel)
How would one exactly know if he/she is ready for this 'challenge'?
Does Maths excite you? Can you sit for hours and study it, solving problems on end without pause or need for pause for that matter? Can you conscientiously put in an hour or two of effort every day for two years and not regret it? Are you already utterly brilliant at Maths by your own estimation? If you've answered 'yes' to all the questions, you my friend are ready for the challenge.

(Original post by derexel)
Well... in my case right now I'm not so sure exactly what I want to do in life for my career, so I'm trying to keep my options open as much as possible. I'm planning on taking Economics HL in IB next year, but if I can't use it at all in University (Oxbridge, LSE, other economics-related universities, ...) because I don't meet the prerequisites for the courses there at school, then it would be quite worthless to take Econs at higher level, wouldn't it?

As you said, and the other people that I've consulted on this topic have all agreed that Maths HL (With a 6 or 7) is definitely required for Economics, Finance, or courses on Business/Management in Uni.
Economics is a very useful subject beyond just thinking about taking it for Uni. If you take any Social Science subject at Uni, the IB course in Economics will complement it in some way.

Again if in your mind you already have a rough idea that you want to do Economics/Finance/Business&Management in the future, then you know if you need Maths HL. However I would suggest you go on UCAS and check Uni requirements. Although for Economics specifically, top Unis want Maths, there could be somewhat different requirements for the other subjects.

It really just comes down to what you want. You don't need to know that you want to study one particular thing in the future, just have a rough enough idea like if you want to study a subject that is English-affiliated or Science-affiliated or Banking and Finance or some such. Once you have that decided, your subject choices become a lot easier.
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FiniteMr
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Hard enough that it's the most difficult HL in the IB programme.

Throughout the two years, I've been getting consistent 7s in my SL subjects, pretty consistent 6/7 in my sciences (chemistry and physics), and anywhere from 1-5 in HL maths. And I breezed maths before IB - sat IGCSE maths 3 years early getting an easy A*, learned two A-level modules while the rest of my year is doing their own IGCSEs, then come to HL maths and it's seriously, seriously difficult.

The main problem is not the content - there's a lot of it, but over the two years it's not a huge syllabus. The problem is the application of it. There are very few, borderline none, trivial problems in IB maths papers. Almost every question involves some kind of trick you need to get around, or a link between two topics you need to find, or something off syllabus that you need to somehow derive using your current knowledge. I've done A-level papers for practise, and although they do more difficult maths topics, their questions are repetitive, obvious, and often trivial, and since it is done in modules, there is no need to be able to link between completely unrelated topics. In contrast, in IB you often need to link between, for example, probability and geometric sequences - vectors and the binomial theorems - ... etc. These are links that are not taught, and the skills need to be gained on your own.
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dogmatichurricane
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Hypocrism explains a HL Maths paper perfectly. That's what makes the course so challenging. Learning formulas and memorizing methods is easy - anyone can do it. Applying them to new situations and often absolutely crazy scenarios is very difficult.

Yes, you're spot on. You NEED HL Math for Economics at Oxbridge/LSE/UCL/Warwick. Warwick still maintains a 6 in HL/7 in SL but with the competition, I think SL pretty much cuts any chance.

Take it and see how you stand after a month or 2. I found the first few weeks tricky, adapting to the system etc. After that, it's been much better because I really like the subject. All in all, regardless of its difficulty HL Math can be one of the most satisfying and intellectually stimulating subjects when you come through it.
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boromir9111
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If you enjoy maths you will love it!
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Fuchsie
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(Original post by derexel)
I'm currently in a bind right now-My maths isn't necessarily stellar right now, and I had dropped from the lower tier of the advanced class to the upper tier of the normal-paced class. I do admit that I had procrastinated in the first month and had no idea what an (I)GCSE was. I do sorely regret my (lack of) decision regarding that; I could have easily returned to the faster paced-lower tier class if I wanted to (My friend did that earlier on). I'm currently in my 2nd year of the IGCSE.

I'm planning on taking Economics HL in IB next year, but I have heard from my friends that it is of utmost importance to take Maths HL in order to compliment the Economics HL choice, otherwise it would be pointless to pick Economics HL, as most universities would reject you because you are in Maths SL. I have consulted with my teachers and they have said that it would be (very) difficult for someone from the standard class to do Maths HL, but it has been done before.

Exactly how hard is the Maths HL?

Also, would this work? How hard would this be? I'm planning on taking English HL, History HL, and Economics HL right now. The safe option right now is Maths at SL, along with the Language and Science. However, I would like to move Maths to HL to accompany the other 3 HLs, instead of swapping English, History or Economics down to SL, in order to play it safe-in the situation that I would have to (unfortunately) drop Maths HL down to SL.)
Hey what's up?
Having done HL maths (finishing this year) i'd actually say that a lot of it is do-able... However, it requires a great deal of comittment to the subject i.e. our class comes into school every saturday and a lot of days in the holidays just for maths.

I think you should take the level of comittment required into account aswell. Oh and the fact that you will feel raped after like 3 straight hours of Series and Differenctial Equations.... the option is nuts....
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dstandish
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It is hard! TBH there is no way you want to be doing 4 HL subjects... I got 8 A* at GCSE's and Im finding IB a tough work load with maths french and economics HL....I like maths im finidng it OK... but if you find parts of IGCSE hard you will really struggle...youre IGCSE stuff needs to be SOLID if youre going to get HL maths. Loads of the people at my school have dropped from SL to maths studies. Its fast paced...I understand most of what were doing in class...but if you forget it then its too late next lesson new topic!


Good luck
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Scribblet
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(Original post by derexel)
I'm currently in a bind right now-My maths isn't necessarily stellar right now, and I had dropped from the lower tier of the advanced class to the upper tier of the normal-paced class. I do admit that I had procrastinated in the first month and had no idea what an (I)GCSE was. I do sorely regret my (lack of) decision regarding that; I could have easily returned to the faster paced-lower tier class if I wanted to (My friend did that earlier on). I'm currently in my 2nd year of the IGCSE.
At IGCSE I was in the higher tier fast paced class for Maths and I got an A* so I figured that I would be fine for HL Maths. I ended up dropping down to SL and doing HL Geography instead after six months.

I don't know if this was partly down to the (in my opinion) too fast teaching (the syllabus was finished in under a year) or due to the difficulty of the maths. Based on my experiences I would say do SL. I'm gettong a 6/7 in it now, but immediatly after I switched I was only getting a four due to the fact I had just trailed behind the others in HL. We started off with 7 people in HL and now there are only 4.
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tealandtaup
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It is very hard. Many people ( the smartest in my year) dropped out and came to my standard class.
Not to forget Maths IA.

BUT if you do intend to study ECON, or other subjects of that sort, such at accounting at uni, stick to it. Many high ranking universities require that.
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k3ro
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It's insane. I did it for the first year, then dropped down to standard in the second year (thank god I took 4 HLs).

At my school there are about 10 people left doing maths HL. I feel sorry for them because they can't drop down. We did the mock exams a few weeks ago, and the HIGHEST score for maths HL was 23/120. There's a guy here who's repeating his last year because his maths HL brought down his overall grade, so he's in his third year of studying maths HL, and he still only got 43/120 (I suppose he'd be the highest score technically but I was only counting the people who'd studied it for 2 years). I hope this demonstrates the difficulty to you.

If you're determined on taking it, i strongly recommend taking 4 HL subjects so you can drop it down. If you seriously fail at it, it could prevent you from passing the diploma.
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Commando3200
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Look, it's basically like this:

If you're prepared to work, you can get a 7. Bear in mind that a 7 is 71-74/100.

It is hard, it's there 's a huge syllabus, but it's not impossible.

Also, many economics programs in the UK require Maths HL, so you should probably do it.

Remember, you need to work.

Good luck.
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alexmsf
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I am just going to say again that it's going to involve a lot of work, and even then you can't be sure about what you will face in the exam. Also, I don't know why noone's mentioned it yet, but time management in exams is a huge problems. When you see questions combining topics which are new, you are going to be extremely pressed for time. Let's not forget Paper 3. You have 1 minute per mark. (1 hour for a 60 mark paper)
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dogmatichurricane
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Just finished my mock paper I. It was HORRIBLE like HORRIBLE HORRIBLE.

My whole class failed haha. Oh well! Our teacher did mention that he made a lot lot worse than the final IB paper.

The paper was saturated with just functions questions combined with trig and calculus alternately :/
The topics aren't too bad but the way the questions were set ughhh.
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FiniteMr
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(Original post by Commando3200)
Look, it's basically like this:

If you're prepared to work, you can get a 7. Bear in mind that a 7 is 71-74/100.

It is hard, it's there 's a huge syllabus, but it's not impossible.

Also, many economics programs in the UK require Maths HL, so you should probably do it.

Remember, you need to work.

Good luck.
I somewhat agree with this but need to add that just work won't get a 7 - you should have breezed your previous maths courses, and you will need the correct intuition as well as hard work to get the 7.
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derexel
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(Original post by Hypocrism)
I somewhat agree with this but need to add that just work won't get a 7 - you should have breezed your previous maths courses, and you will need the correct intuition as well as hard work to get the 7.
Exactly how much time/'hard work' is required to do well in the Maths HL in IB? It's difficult to see how if someone is able to do Maths HL because of the conflicting reports from the other TSR users.
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TheCrackFox
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Is Maths HL on par with A-Level Further Maths? I presume both share similar content.
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FiniteMr
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(Original post by TheCrackFox)
Is Maths HL on par with A-Level Further Maths? I presume both share similar content.
In terms of the difficulty of syllabus content, no, it's not. They do far more statistics, quite a lot more calculus (and earlier!). But IB HL maths is probably as difficult as A-level FM, because the questions themselves and the skills needed to answer them are more difficult. A-level is modular so you don't need to combine abilities from multiple areas of the syllabus - you won't have to mix matrices and differentiation, for example.

(Original post by derexel)
Exactly how much time/'hard work' is required to do well in the Maths HL in IB? It's difficult to see how if someone is able to do Maths HL because of the conflicting reports from the other TSR users.
At least an hour a night during the first year, and probably between 1-2 hours in the second year, along with a lot,lot,lot of time in the period leading up to exams. I'm aiming to do every past paper ever, and there are a tonne because of the time zones.
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xRomex
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(Original post by derexel)
Exactly how much time/'hard work' is required to do well in the Maths HL in IB? It's difficult to see how if someone is able to do Maths HL because of the conflicting reports from the other TSR users.
I didn't do quite as much as hypocrism. During term time just homework, so probably a couple of hours a week, and then in the Easter holidays I set aside about 6 full days to go over everything, which seemed to work practise papers are amazing!! Do as many as possible
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