descrimination and the art of public school bashing Watch

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Suzy_vet
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#61
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#61
Well thats nice to know. I guess inner london is bad. i live in south east, there are a lot of very good state schools.

Anyway, now weve got sorted, must go do some work!
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hitchhiker_13
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#62
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#62
(Original post by quinnbrakes)
If they both have 3 a levels nothing more nothing less then your conclusion is equally invalid. What if the privately schooled pupill had suffered the loss of both his parents days before the exams or if he was ranked 1st in the country in all three subjects he could still at best be as good as the other pupill because of what school he went to? There are so many possible variations that your point generalises itself into nothing.

As for public school ppl descriminating against others. Of course it happens but in my view is already well publicised my point in starting this thread was to say that it isnt always that way around and that public school bashing is equally wrong.

Generalisations are necessary in an argument like this. You keep picking out extraordinarily insignificant exceptions.
And learn how to spell! With such a wonderful education behind you it shouldn't be a problem.
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Schmelen
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#63
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#63
hmm, i'm not trying to purposefully stir things up here, like most of the other folks here (as far as i can gather) i am against discrimination, whether 'positive' or otherwise. However, i do think that one area that would make a difference in terms of privilege public school etc and state school yadda yadda is that (and i know this is a generalisation, and for that i apologise) in my experience, state school students do things like go out and get a job whilst they are studying. i have a job, and i know that i would get more work done for college if i didnt have it, as it takes a substantial chunk of time out of my weekend. in my experience the 'privileged' public schooly folks do not have this to deal with. i know i would relish the oppurtunity to not have a part time job, and although i have done okay, i feel a bit like ive done okay despite the odds... hmmm. sorry if that doesnt make any sense. i guess i am just trying to say that there are certain circumstances that are common to a lot of state school students that create disadvantages.

oh, and i think the oxbridge system, by conducting interviews, is able to spot those who are naturally talented, enthusiastic, and would be a pleasure to teach etc, and as such they can set aside the 'advantages' of some and the 'disadvantages' of others. for this i have great respect in the oxbridge admissions system.
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dreamer
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#64
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#64
(Original post by Tek)
There are probably some people (like me) who have had bad experiences of state school students, especially in Inner London (where I go to school) and let's face it, the state schools there are pretty awful. However, I don't know anyone who has any particular prejudices against state school students.
Tek, you don't go to Westminister by any chance do you?
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Suzy_vet
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#65
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#65
Tek, you don't go to Westminister by any chance do you?


Thats a school and a half. how many people do they get into oxbridge each year? Tons!

The job thing is a good point. I only have a small job which i dont feel affects me much, but i know others who work a lot just so they can buy their clothes etc. Do many public schoolers have jobs? I honestly dont know.

Just like to point out to Tek that in areas other than london, and i guess a few other major cities, private school is not such a big deal. Grammar schools especially are highly respected and people usually go there.Im not sure how you can generalise about state school people at all, since they make up about 80% at least of the population. I think you need to get out of london and experince things. Where are you planning to go next year? ox or cam or where?
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Helenia
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#66
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#66
(Original post by Schmelen)
However, i do think that one area that would make a difference in terms of privilege public school etc and state school yadda yadda is that (and i know this is a generalisation, and for that i apologise) in my experience, state school students do things like go out and get a job whilst they are studying. i have a job, and i know that i would get more work done for college if i didnt have it, as it takes a substantial chunk of time out of my weekend.
Thing is, a lot of private schools have Saturday school, and finish a lot later in the evenings than state schools, so it is not always feasible to have a job in term time. I got home at 7 every night from school and then had to work (I could have stayed at school to do prep but then wouldn't have got home till 9:30). Technically I could have worked on a Sunday, but even then various school commitments would take me out of things several times a term (choir, matches etc). A couple of my friends did work during term time on Sundays and stuff, and more worked in the holidays, but I'd agree it's probably a lower proportion than that of state school kids. I would probably have liked to (God knows money was tight enouhg in our family and I could have done with some of my own) but I really couldn't with everything else I was doing.
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blissy
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#67
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#67
In my case, I had to work a lot harder, as a state school student, than a public school student to end up at Cambridge. My secondary school was less than supportive - nearly everyone I spoke to discouraged me from applying and in the end I had to go to someone from the local grammar school to help me with my application.

As for my A Levels - my English teacher was on-and-off sick for two years and was never replaced, there was a timetable clash between French and art which meant I had to go to 2 French lessons and 3 Art lessons a week, learning all the rest outside of school, getting together enough money to have one hour's private French tuition a week. My teacher neglected to tell me I had to do a 5 minute prepared speech for my A level oral because she didn't like the fact I couldn't attend all her lessons. I worked so hard outside of school to get to Cambridge and I'm very proud I'm here - I'm the only person to ever apply from my school, let alone get in.

My school was completely demoralising, not only did I have all these academic issues, but I was bullied every year for being "brainy". What happened to me is prevelant, but many people just give in either to the bullies or are happy to accept the appalling standards of teaching rather than go home and make up for what was missed by the teacher.

I understand that if you've made it to Oxbridge you're of the same intellectual standard - but please recognise that as a state school student you have to battle all the way to get here.
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Helenia
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#68
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#68
Of course we recognise that, and I respect it totally. I just resent the assumption that my life has come to me on a silver platter.
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Suzy_vet
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#69
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#69
Fair enough Helenia. I do see what you mean, and i toltally see it must be annoying. As long as you guys undersatnd that there is still a huge difference at oxbridge with admissions numbers, and when they start tlaking about 'positive discrimination' (however silly this may be, and i think it is) they are doing it for a reason.

Personally, when i get there, im not going to give a dam where people come from, and i hope everyone else wont either! I hope, and im sure, everyone gets in on their own merit.
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Meerkat
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#70
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#70
As many of you know me, I am a huge fan of public schools. However, with all due respect, I would like to point out that your expensive education has not taught you how to spell the simplest of words such as ridiculous (you spelt as ridiculas) and discrimination (descrimination?).

I know a couple of public school boys. And in no way are they as arrogant as many portray them to be. Perhaps they are just needles in the haystack, one among the thousands. But still, I am impressed by their charm. Such is the irresistable charm public school boys are renowned for.

I agree tho' that you all work hard for your grades and deserve merit. Oh well.
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Tek
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#71
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#71
(Original post by Meerkat)
As many of you know me, I am a huge fan of public schools. However, with all due respect, I would like to point out that your expensive education has not taught you how to spell the simplest of words such as ridiculous (you spelt as ridiculas) and discrimination (descrimination?).
Would you care to tell us who exactly you're talking to here?
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Meerkat
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#72
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#72
(Original post by Tek)
Would you care to tell us who exactly you're talking to here?
Sorry, I was speaking to Quinnbrakes.
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quinnbrakes
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#73
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#73
Sorry about the spelling im pretty heavily dyslexic.
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Mysticmin
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#74
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#74
Expensive education can buy you better grades. I go to a public school (albeit a cheap one) and i swear some of the girls in my year would have failed half their GCSEs if they weren't taught well. Actually that's true, a couple of them moved to state sixth form colleges and did fail...but that could be due to their lack of good work ethics.

But I also went to a state school beforehand and got teased because I did well at school. But one of my friends said that the teasing deterioates when you get further up the education system.

And as for the state school prejudice...none in my school, but a couple of friends i have at a more expensive boarding school are. Tried to make them see that they're being ignorant-hasn't worked so far - silly idiots.
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lgs98jonee
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#75
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i agree...i only go to a posh school cos i got loads of money...we r not spoon fed, the teaching is rubbish, in the lessons every1 messes about cos most have so much money and their dad owns a company etc so they dont need any qualifications! the only good thing (in terms of learning) about them is they are selective and so most people are reasonably clever...
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Mysticmin
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#76
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(Original post by lgs98jonee)
i agree...i only go to a posh school cos i got loads of money...we r not spoon fed, the teaching is rubbish, in the lessons every1 messes about cos most have so much money and their dad owns a company etc so they dont need any qualifications! the only good thing (in terms of learning) about them is they are selective and so most people are reasonably clever...
Sounds annoying, if the teaching was rubbish at my school I'd actually drop out and go to the local state school instead of paying.
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Joey_Johns
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#77
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(Original post by calumc)
Personally I think public schools are a waste of money - although having gone to an 'ordinary' state school and got top grades, and an Oxford offer, what else am I supposed to think?

Those who are publically/privately educated don't bother me provided they aren't arrogant, which is a quality I cannot stand - and unfortunately many are. Having met several (especially at Oxford) in my recent university interviews and so on, I have been given the impression that while some are reassuringly normal, there are always arrogant idiots who defiantly look down upon us state-educated people.

Many of the publically educated lot seem to be under the impression that because their parents were stupid enough to pay far more for their education, then they must be more intelligent than we are. No, sorry, it just means your parents are less intelligent than mine, who chose to live in an area with a good state school and saved their money.
Public school isnt just about top grade and getting into OXbridge. It often offers a far more rounded education and facilities that state schools couldnt ever match.
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Joey_Johns
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#78
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(Original post by calumc)
"Rounded" my arse. Rounded is living and studying in a state school surrounded by ordinary, unselected people, including idiots who don't want to work, just like in the REAL WORLD.

If I ever NEED extra facilites, I'll pay for them there and then - and what extra facitities could you possibly offer me, for example, for Advanced Higher maths? At present I have 8 hours taught lessons per week, between two teachers, in a class size of TWO. In chemistry, its three, and in Physics, just me and the teacher. That's one of the advantages of going to a school where most people are considerable less intelligent than you are.
Lol. I've got news for you, there are people who dont want to work in private schools too. Quite frankly I doubt you have ever seen the facilities public schools offer, a lot include experiences you cannot pay for without going to a public school. There is a reason why the majority of the rugby players which will turn out tommorow for England went to public schools for example.

Er, my girlfriend is terribly dyslexic. She got BBC at A level, with a lot of ex curricular help in very small classes. People with problems are helped greatly at public school.
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wayland
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#79
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#79
According to an ex-girlfriend of mine, the school that she goes to, which is St Paul's Girls' School, charges £10590 a year and still has crap teaching.

Not very good value for money.
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blissy
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#80
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(Original post by calumc)
Why would I want to pay £10-20,000 a year, for possibly less facilities, which I won't even use?
Fewer, please!

<is fighting a private battle against "less" in inappropriate usage>

Less money, fewer pounds.
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