descrimination and the art of public school bashing Watch

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Helenia
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#81
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#81
(Original post by calumc)
Why would I want to pay £10-20,000 a year, for possibly less facilities, which I won't even use?
Not everybody has access to the kind of state school you do though. Grantown's a nice place though, went there years ago on holiday. But most people don't live in remote places like that.
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quinnbrakes
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#82
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#82
My Dad works for shell too. They've paid for all my school fees over the years while my parents have lived in places with awful schools like Nigeria. Thought the firm paid for private schools for all employees kids?
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Helenia
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#83
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#83
(Original post by calumc)
Why would they do that?
A lot of companies do, if they're making their employees travel. It's not very fair of them to expect them to hoist their kids out of school every time they move, is it?

One of my friends at school boarded because her parents were living in Hong Kong, where they'd been sent by her dad's company. The company was paying her fees, I'm fairly sure.
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Joey_Johns
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#84
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#84
(Original post by Helenia)
A lot of companies do, if they're making their employees travel. It's not very fair of them to expect them to hoist their kids out of school every time they move, is it?

One of my friends at school boarded because her parents were living in Hong Kong, where they'd been sent by her dad's company. The company was paying her fees, I'm fairly sure.
Yes a couple of my friends have dads working for oil companies or summat and they got reduced fees, but not all of the fees.
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kildare
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#85
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#85
I'd say about 5% of the students at my school have 100% of their fees paid by their parents. It's an international school though, so I suppose it's a special case.
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Bristol uni
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#86
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#86
I have an outrageous Quiff !!
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Joey_Johns
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#87
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(Original post by calumc)
Fascinating, but the patronising tone was unnecessary and only helps re-inforce the sterotypes you all get so upset about. Yes, I'm sure there are the odd few who don't want to work, but in state schools there are a great deal more, as I'm sure common sense will tell anyone.

I don't see what extra facilities a public school could possibly provide me with. All I can think of is sport, since this is what you mentioned. Now, background info - I go to a small state school (350 pupils) in the Scottish Highlands. It has a swimming pool, a football pitch, a rugby field, tennis courts, and is adjacent to a full 18-hole golf course and a bowling green. It is also right in the middle of prime areas for both fishing and skiing, depending on the time of year. There's even a curling pond down the road, and if I really wanted to, I could go shooting. I use approximately none of these facilities regularly. Why would I want to pay £10-20,000 a year, for possibly less facilities, which I won't even use?
Lol. Have you ever been or seen an average state school? You are without doubt a great exception. I would also argue though that the pastoral care you get at private schools is far greater than that of a state school.

Prime area for skiing? Read Jeremy Clarkson's article on Scotland in the Times yesterday lol.
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Dystopian
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#88
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#88
Two dimes from the newbie-

I go to a private school. It can be bloody unpleasant, with the competitive streak, the bullying - I might be making 'sweeping generalisations' but private school girls appear to bully mentally, in state schools, you tend to find the physical. Not just based on stats and stuff, I actually went to a state school for a couple of years, and had dog stuff smeared on my books, chased home from school, etc.

However- not all state schools are like my experience. There are some far worse, some far better. In the area, my school consistently gets about 10-20 people into Oxbridge per year. So do the state schools. The league tables are very competitive.

What I will say is that, in private school, you don't just buy your way in. I had to sit a variety of tests to get into the high school I was bullied at, and it was only because I was literally approaching break-down, had an interview with the headmaster of my present school, and had consistent A grades that I was waived from the exam. It was an escape. Generally, you sit an entrance exam, in which private schools pick you on the basis of your intelligence. Personally, I'm taking a gap year next year to work bloody hard to earn money for uni. I'm going to be working every holiday to pay for my education, and I'm going to come out with a huge debt. Then, I'm going to need postgraduate training-

Point- my parents cannot fund my education. We have had to sell our house to afford private education, and that is where I thrive. I exist on a supply of books, small classes, and extra curriculars. That is what we pay for. I don't get spoon-fed, all my teachers hate spoon-feeding, tell us it's bleeding useless, and proceed to work us hard. We fund their salaries, so they work us harder- they work US. In state schools, it is reliant on your own work ethic, here, it is probably harder to slack off, though it is possible.

I am not a 'public school girl', I am me, and I happened to get a private education. The only way I was able to maintain my grades from public to state to public was through studying on my own. I read voraciously, and I did then, my father taught me maths at the level of my private class, and also science. My mother is fluent in French from her years as an au-pair, and we spoke it around the house. History- I read. English - I read.

The point of all this is, I work in a 'more privileged' way at private school, but I do work. I got straight A GCSE grades, and I don't test well. Now I'm taking six AS levels, and then five A levels. In a state school, I could do exactly the same, dependent on my work ethic. Okay, I wouldn't have access to the French and Maths of my parents' abilities, but I could do work at the state funded libraries, which have vast sections on Maths, French, English, History, Science...

Private schools' prospectuses are all about extra curricular. We pay to have drama productions every term, for the sixth form centre to have vending machines, and comfortable chairs, and so the books in the library can cover obscure subjects. We pay for teaching too - however ALL of our teachers have worked in state schools prior to coming here, so their 'better teaching' has been accessible. Some of our teachers (good ones too) have left to go and teach in state schools. Whether good/bad teachers teach in places is reliant on their personal preferences.

So - basically, Oxford and Cambridge is about potential and your work ethic. Sure, I could get AAAA at A level, and that could be less hard than a state school student with bad testing ability, but if that person has the potential to get to Oxbridge, s/he will work their arse off to get there, if they want it. That potential will be recognised, and Oxbridge do have their pick of the students. Private/state, doesn't matter. We're equal on a footing that we're ALL considering/going to Oxbridge, and that we will overcome whatever to get there.
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Joey_Johns
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#89
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#89
(Original post by calumc)
Ah right - my dad doesn't do any long-term travelling, he works on the management side and is only in Aberdeen - the only travelling is due to our home being in Grantown. He has a flat in Aberdeen and works there during the week - there are higher payed jobs in Aberdeen, but Grantown is a far nicer place to live, so it's an arrangement which works well.
Lol def for you anyway.
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Suzy_vet
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#90
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#90
(Original post by Joey_Johns)
Lol. Have you ever been or seen an average state school? You are without doubt a great exception. I would also argue though that the pastoral care you get at private schools is far greater than that of a state school.

Prime area for skiing? Read Jeremy Clarkson's article on Scotland in the Times yesterday lol.
Sorry mate, but your talking out of your back side.

How exactly are you, a private school (or, sorry, should that be 'public school' as you lot seem to be getting very depensive about that recently) student telling state schoolers they're wrong about state schools? You obviously dont have a clue.

You only ever here about failing schools on the news, you seem to assume this is true generally. My school is equally good, and in the real world. There are LOTS of them. Most parents with common sense and an unsnobby sensibility will look into the schools in an area before they move there, to make sure there are good ones. You rairly have to move to one town, theres usually a bit of a choice when you move due to imployment, so looking around is usually fairly successful

I agree this may not always be the case in some areas of london. Also, if your moving around a lot, then i can understand companies paying for education.
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Rob24601
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#91
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One case i will use to support the statement that it is easier to get the top AAA grades at a private school is the greater emphasis on coursework recently. In my state school you got one attempt to complete your coursework, together with a rough guide of what to include and then you were just left to do it. Then it was asked to be handed in say a month or so later, and that was it. The mark you got was sent to the exam board and it was finished. In private schools each pupil gets personal help on every stage of its development, and dare i say, "spoonfed" the answers. Several re-drafts are produced until the final one the teacher is satisfied with, and then finally the teacher will properly mark them (apart from having seen them several times already) and send them off to the exam board.

This doesnt seem to be fair at all.

Additionally many independent schools are taken on an abundance of trips to supplement their studies and gain real life experiences of the things they are studying in the classroom. However state schools simply do not have the funding or the resources to send the pupils on this volume of trips and many are barely able to organize the essential trips many subjects require to be used for coursework.
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Dystopian
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#92
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#92
To be perfectly honest, I started out following the thread looking for people who agreed with the principle that yes, you can be prejudiced against if you attend a private school.


I have had a home counties accent since I could speak. When I attempted to disguise it, I got made to repeat vocal exercises at home. You would not believe the flack we get for speaking 'posh'. I quite like RP to listen to, its clearer, and it does mean I can learn accents quicker, the complete absence of one (cept English) seems to mean I pick them up remarkably quickly, but even my friends pick on e, 'God, she thinks cuz she can say it in a posh voice, she's cleverer than us' 'Teehee, you sound so uptight when you talk like that' and so on. Just as it's not their fault they've got a Suffolk/Essex/London accent around here, it's not my bloody fault I don't. I had home counties when I went to state education, and sodding hell, that was a palaver and a half! Try having dog sh*t smeared on your books because of where you come from, and being chased home from school because you're a 'posh git who doesn't belong in a state school'.

I've dealt with the 'so which school do you go to?' I tell them, the eye roll, the perfunctory glance, and the instant, 'oh well, I can't afford that, my parents can't buy my education' while sizing me up to see if I do, listening to my accent, and speech to catch me in an error.

I'm in the in-between crowd, rich enough to afford education in the private sector,and not get means-scholarships, but so poor my parents are selling our house because we can't pay the mortgage and the school fees. I'm going to be working this summer, this easter, the next summer, and deferring entry to work, so I can afford to pay for some of it. But nobody thinks of that. It's all, 'daddy bought you your schooling' and the idea that I got in because I had privileges.

Yeah, I have pastoral care. So what? It doesn't mean that half of us are not discouraged from Oxbridge, we're not intimidated, that we don't deserve to experience Oxbridge and so on early, or qualify for needs-based aid, because some of us bloody do. I'm so fed up with sweeping generalisations (yes, I'm aware I've made a few, but it's so un-PC it's PC again) that I'm basing my mini-rant on personal experience.

What I also hate is the instant assumption that we don't understand. That we dont know what a 'real' state school is like. Hell, you want stories of deprivation, I've got 'em up the ying yang. I'm luckier, I was bullied so heavily the bully got sent to juvie, but my brother stayed in state education so I could go to private school. I got given a cut rate anyway, because when we'd been able to afford private school, the headmistress had got to know me, liked me, and pitied me. So yeah, I've been there. I've endured my mum dressing me in a blue pleated skirt together with the uniform teeshirt so I had a 'proper' uniform, and coming home with it ripped.

I've been there. I know its bloody hard to be smart there, and the criticism.

But there's another side.

I work hard for my grades. I test badly, straight As in my GCSES, which I was disappointed with. I spend hours a night on my study, I write extra essays, I read constantly, I ask extra questions, in maths last year, I begged for extra classes, and took out text books from the library in town to teach myself. I was constantly derided, 'oh you're *clever*, aren't you?' 'It's easier for you, you're *intelligent*', dirty words. When I got A's, and wanted to cry, because there were no A*s that I'd worked thirteen hour days for, friends laughed, and threw parties for their C's, and D's.

I get the teachers' funny looks, 'you want to go to *cambridge* to take English? Risky, very risky,' 'Hmm. Have you thought about Durham, Wawrick, York, King's?' The laughs, that I'm not smart enough from other Oxbridge hopefuls, that I'm too smart in lessons. That the A I get on a paper isn't as 'good' as one from someone who gets consistent B's.

That hurts the worst. That we private school people don't deserve our grades, and places because we come from 'privilege'. It's a f*cking A, people, there is nothing higher. It means the same, because we use the same exam boards. Privileges - its not *that* important. I dance, but I pay for it myself. I worked Satrdays and Sundays, eight o'clock to six with an hour's break over Christmas, ie, October to late January to earn the money to pay for my classes. I babysit. I don't get an allowance, so I pay for everything - clothes, dance, music lessons, myself. It *is* possible.

So, basically, if you want to go cheer public bashers, do it elsewhere. *Our* thread, to nurse our grievances at being blamed for an inheritance of discrimination. It's not *our* fault your parents/schools/past repuations are discriminated against, we're just getting on with it.
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Suzy_vet
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#93
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#93
(Original post by Rob24601)
One case i will use to support the statement that it is easier to get the top AAA grades at a private school is the greater emphasis on coursework recently. In my state school you got one attempt to complete your coursework, together with a rough guide of what to include and then you were just left to do it. Then it was asked to be handed in say a month or so later, and that was it. The mark you got was sent to the exam board and it was finished. In private schools each pupil gets personal help on every stage of its development, and dare i say, "spoonfed" the answers. Several re-drafts are produced until the final one the teacher is satisfied with, and then finally the teacher will properly mark them (apart from having seen them several times already) and send them off to the exam board.

This doesnt seem to be fair at all.

Additionally many independent schools are taken on an abundance of trips to supplement their studies and gain real life experiences of the things they are studying in the classroom. However state schools simply do not have the funding or the resources to send the pupils on this volume of trips and many are barely able to organize the essential trips many subjects require to be used for coursework.
Hmm, once again it dnepends on your school, and to an extent subject. We get a few chances to do coursework for some subjects. But i know that for English GCSE we did the work that had to be done and that was it. A friend from another school did tons, and then selcted them. That was a state grammar. But i wouldnt have liked ot do that, far too much work!

Also, since private school people keep saying that their schools are much better, and to a certain extent they are, do they agree that state schools people ahve been somewhat deprived and themselves advantaged? And do they therefore agree that state school people should be given a bit of a break when applying to top unis, and their situations taken into full account?
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happysunshine
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#94
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(Original post by Suzy_vet)
Sorry mate, but your talking out of your back side.

How exactly are you, a private school (or, sorry, should that be 'public school' as you lot seem to be getting very depensive about that recently) student telling state schoolers they're wrong about state schools? You obviously dont have a clue.

You only ever here about failing schools on the news, you seem to assume this is true generally. My school is equally good, and in the real world. There are LOTS of them. Most parents with common sense and an unsnobby sensibility will look into the schools in an area before they move there, to make sure there are good ones. You rairly have to move to one town, theres usually a bit of a choice when you move due to imployment, so looking around is usually fairly successful

I agree this may not always be the case in some areas of london. Also, if your moving around a lot, then i can understand companies paying for education.
LOL, yes I'm sure all parents can just more around and find an area which excellent schools, just like that. Even if there are lots of schools in one area, those that live in the catchment area will fill the school up. Surely if you're defending state schools you should understand that it's not that easy to find a good state school like yours. I think it's pretty realisitc to say that a lot of state schools are bad because they are, maybe it's you that doesn't have a clue!
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Joey_Johns
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#95
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(Original post by happysunshine)
LOL, yes I'm sure all parents can just more around and find an area which excellent schools, just like that. Even if there are lots of schools in one area, those that live in the catchment area will fill the school up. Surely if you're defending state schools you should understand that it's not that easy to find a good state school like yours. I think it's pretty realisitc to say that a lot of state schools are bad because they are, maybe it's you that doesn't have a clue!
Agreed. There are very few good state schools. In my LEA there are two top ones which achieve 100% gcse pass rate and the there are about 5/6 which achieve reasonable ranging from 50-70%. There are about 30-40 other schools which are then just dreadful. If you dont live within the cathment area for the good schools you are pretty much buggered.
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happysunshine
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#96
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(Original post by Joey_Johns)
Agreed. There are very few good state schools. In my LEA there are two top ones which achieve 100% gcse pass rate and the there are about 5/6 which achieve reasonable ranging from 50-70%. There are about 30-40 other schools which are then just dreadful. If you dont live within the cathment area for the good schools you are pretty much buggered.
And you get told you don't have a clue!
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Joey_Johns
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#97
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(Original post by happysunshine)
And you get told you don't have a clue!
That would be state school children who dont have a clue about private schools.
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happysunshine
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#98
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(Original post by Joey_Johns)
That would be state school children who dont have a clue about private schools.
I'm probably one of those
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Joey_Johns
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#99
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(Original post by happysunshine)
I'm probably one of those
Not at all.
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happysunshine
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#100
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(Original post by Joey_Johns)
Not at all.
LOL, well I don't think you all go around playing croquet.
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