descrimination and the art of public school bashing Watch

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Joey_Johns
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#101
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#101
(Original post by happysunshine)
LOL, well I don't think you all go around playing croquet.
Hehe, I think we have a croquet set somewhere in the shed. Only a cheap one from woolworths though that hasnt seen the light of day since I was about 10 and bored during the summer.

No, well thats it, i've said it before you look at both sides, thats really good. You shall do well in GCSE English methinks What are you taking for A levels?
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happysunshine
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#102
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#102
(Original post by Joey_Johns)
Hehe, I think we have a croquet set somewhere in the shed. Only a cheap one from woolworths though that hasnt seen the light of day since I was about 10 and bored during the summer.

No, well thats it, i've said it before you look at both sides, thats really good. You shall do well in GCSE English methinks What are you taking for A levels?
LOL, I've seen those kiddy plastic ones before

English Language is by far one of my best subjects (strange since my spelling is awful). A-Levels: English (not sure which), History and other then two from: Biology, G&P, Maths or Ancient History :confused:
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kildare
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#103
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#103
Is there any real point in doing both History and Ancient History? (unless you REALLY really want to do History at uni, and even then.....)
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Joey_Johns
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#104
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#104
(Original post by happysunshine)
LOL, I've seen those kiddy plastic ones before

English Language is by far one of my best subjects (strange since my spelling is awful). A-Levels: English (not sure which), History and other then two from: Biology, G&P, Maths or Ancient History :confused:
No it was a 'quality' woolworths set, made of wood and metal hoops. Played with it about 3 times It was a typical mum purchase to shut me up during the holidays, it failed.

I've always been really good at english, but again my spelling is pretty dire, its weird I can spell latin and greek much better.

I'd take Ancient History, I did classical civ which is the same thing but AQA not OCR, its really interesting. Hmm, then I'd take either biology or maths depending on how much you enjoy the subject.
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Musicwoman
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#105
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#105
I'm not a public/private school basher. If my mother could have afforded it, I would have been there like a shot. As it is, I'm a bog-standard comp and LEA sixth-form college gal through and through.

But tell me something (well a few things actually), if you are privately educated:

1) how big are your class sizes - for GCSE? for your A level subjects?

I had in excess of 30 in each of my GCSE classes and 22 in my biggest A level class.

2) were you taught by qualified, experienced teachers at all times? Have you ever experienced moving from one supply teacher to another for lessons, week after week?

3) are your lessons disrupted because your school is forced to take all those permanently excluded from other schools in the area?

4) have you ever experienced having to teach yourself some subjects / modules because there was no-one to teach it to you?

5) have you ever experienced having to go for extra lessons with the Head of Department after school when both you and she were exhausted because it was the only way you could catch up work missed because of absent teachers?

From my 'bog-standard experience', I have picked up 12 GCSEs all at A* and A, AAAE AS grades ( the 'E', if you're ondering, was for a subject in which we were taught the wrong things, inappropriately, by a teacher who b*****ed off without staying to face the consequences. I got A* in the same subject at GCSE) and predicted AAA A2 grades.

Now which of us had the easier ride, eh?
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Joey_Johns
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#106
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#106
(Original post by Musicwoman)
I'm not a public/private school basher. If my mother could have afforded it, I would have been there like a shot. As it is, I'm a bog-standard comp and LEA sixth-form college gal through and through.

But tell me something (well a few things actually), if you are privately educated:

1) how big are your class sizes - for GCSE? for your A level subjects?

I had in excess of 30 in each of my GCSE classes and 22 in my biggest A level class.

2) were you taught by qualified, experienced teachers at all times? Have you ever experienced moving from one supply teacher to another for lessons, week after week?

3) are your lessons disrupted because your school is forced to take all those permanently excluded from other schools in the area?

4) have you ever experienced having to teach yourself some subjects / modules because there was no-one to teach it to you?

5) have you ever experienced having to go for extra lessons with the Head of Department after school when both you and she were exhausted because it was the only way you could catch up work missed because of absent teachers?

From my 'bog-standard experience', I have picked up 12 GCSEs all at A* and A, AAAE AS grades ( the 'E', if you're ondering, was for a subject in which we were taught the wrong things, inappropriately, by a teacher who b*****ed off without staying to face the consequences. I got A* in the same subject at GCSE) and predicted AAA A2 grades.

Now which of us had the easier ride, eh?

1) About 9-10 for GCSE, 5-6 for some of my A levels but for the others 10-12.

2) We did have supply teaches, I think this is very similar to state school but probably state schools have more.

3) No. But there are still idiots that disrupt lessons at private schools.

4) Yes, done it often because some teachers were dreadful or I didnt listen.

5) No.

Easier ride = private school. But thats just life, it isnt fair.
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Musicwoman
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#107
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#107
(Original post by Joey_Johns)
1) About 9-10 for GCSE, 5-6 for some of my A levels but for the others 10-12.

2) We did have supply teaches, I think this is very similar to state school but probably state schools have more.

3) No. But there are still idiots that disrupt lessons at private schools.

4) Yes, done it often because some teachers were dreadful or I didnt listen.

5) No.

Easier ride = private school. But thats just life, it isnt fair.

Can you describe 'idiots that disrupt' in a bit more detail? Then I'll give you some examples of ours...
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fishpaste
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#108
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#108
(Original post by Suzy_vet)
Most parents with common sense and an unsnobby sensibility will look into the schools in an area before they move there, to make sure there are good ones.
When my parents moved to North Manchester, they did so because it's the only area they could afford (~£27k), and they were sick of getting robbed at gunpoint where we lived in Hulme. [/drama queen] But no seriously, my education was not their primary concern back then, and fair enough.
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Joey_Johns
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#109
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#109
(Original post by Musicwoman)
Can you describe 'idiots that disrupt' in a bit more detail? Then I'll give you some examples of ours...
Lol. Ok they obviously wernt as bad as your but disruptive non the less. You have done well for yourself, it is often people like you who go on to make it big, let us not forget most multi millionaire entrepeneurs didnt even do A levels or often GCSE's. They are however very determined, you obviouslyt have good determination. Best of luck.
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Musicwoman
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#110
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#110
(Original post by Joey_Johns)
Lol. Ok they obviously wernt as bad as your but disruptive non the less. You have done well for yourself, it is often people like you who go on to make it big, let us not forget most multi millionaire entrepeneurs didnt even do A levels or often GCSE's. They are however very determined, you obviouslyt have good determination. Best of luck.

ROFLOL

Awww...shucks... how sweet to see the feudal system is not dead...

Next time I want to be patronised, I'll beat a path to your door
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Joey_Johns
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#111
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#111
(Original post by Musicwoman)
ROFLOL

Awww...shucks... how sweet to see the feudal system is not dead...

Next time I want to be patronised, I'll beat a path to your door
I wasnt being patronising. My girlfriends grandad is a great example of rags to riches story. I have more respect for people who make it from a worse off background.

That might just be the problem here, even when a 'more fortunate' person says well done, they get slated for being patronisng. It seems you have the problem rather than me.
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Musicwoman
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#112
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#112
(Original post by Joey_Johns)
I wasnt being patronising. My girlfriends grandad is a great example of rags to riches story. I have more respect for people who make it from a worse off background.

That might just be the problem here, even when a 'more fortunate' person says well done, they get slated for being patronisng. It seems you have the problem rather than me.

No need to be so defensive! Tone is everything on therse boards nd the one thing no-one can hear. Why do you think I out a huge smiley at the end? A bit of gentle teasing going on - so stop thinking you have to be defensive!!
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defec8ing
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#113
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#113
My parents both come from working class backgrounds, are the only members of their families to have gone to uni, and are now both G.Ps. With their incomes, they can now afford to send me to public school; yet I fail to see why my future applications to Oxbridge, should perhaps be jeopardised by those, who, aiming to re-dress the balance of state-public entrants, might reject me on these grounds: as I have seen happen to many others!
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defec8ing
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#114
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#114
(Original post by calumc)
To be fair they should really be harder on public educated applicants, since they get an "easier ride" - I suppose that's what they pay for. It seems to me that someone with good grades at a public school where they had an "edge" over those at state schools is less likely to succeed later, when they lose their "edge", than someone from a state school who probably worked harder for their grades and didn't have the advantage to begin with.

So are you suggesting that if, you do well at uni, and were then able to send your children to private school, because you could now afford to, you would want your children to be prevented from doing as well as you have, simply because you yourself would have achieved?
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fishpaste
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#115
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#115
(Original post by defec8ing)
So are you suggesting that if, you do well at uni, and were then able to send your children to private school, because you could now afford to, you would want your children to be prevented from doing as well as you have, simply because you yourself would have achieved?
But it's your parents who earned the success, not you. It's not like you earned the extra resources.
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fishpaste
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#116
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#116
(Original post by defec8ing)
So are you suggesting that if, you do well at uni, and were then able to send your children to private school, because you could now afford to, you would want your children to be prevented from doing as well as you have, simply because you yourself would have achieved?
Er no, did you read the post? The idea is that it's easier to get AAA at private school than a crappy state school, therefore, if a state school applicant got AAA, they deserve preference.
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happysunshine
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#117
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#117
(Original post by fishpaste)
Er no, did you read the post? The idea is that it's easier to get AAA at private school than a crappy state school, therefore, if a state school applicant got AAA, they deserve preference.
Isn't this what interviews are for? The truely better one will get the place, right?
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fishpaste
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#118
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#118
(Original post by happysunshine)
Isn't this what interviews are for? The truely better one will get the place, right?
You're essentially arguing that grades don't matter, ever. Which is clearly not the case.
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happysunshine
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#119
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#119
(Original post by fishpaste)
You're essentially arguing that grades don't matter, ever. Which is clearly not the case.
Er it obviously is. Loads of state schoolers get A grades and they can still apply with AAB. Plus sixth form teaching a state schools is a lot better than gcse teaching.
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defec8ing
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#120
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#120
It does seem to me, that if we punish the children of graduates, who, after all, are only seeking to give their children a better start in life than they themselves have had; then are we not condemning the child by the actions of its parents, and hindering him/her from attaining success, which they may or may not have achieved anyway at a state school?
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