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    If I add dilute hydrochloric acid to a solid X and the result is a colourless gas turning limewater milky - that is either a carbonate or a hydrogencarbonate. What can I do to test whether X is a carbonate or a hydrogencarbonate? There must be some way to differentiate. Thanks.
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    could be either as the lime water stuff just signifies the release of CO2...
    from memory if you heat hydrogencarbonate it will react to form a carbonate, or something like that....consult a text book!
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    I THINK you can use Ca2+ to detect carbonates but not hydrogencarbonates.
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    Coolio. I've just found out that a pH test is the best method where 7-8 indicates a HCO3 and 12-14 confirms a CO3. Thanks anyway.
 
 
 
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