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Why do revolutions tend to result in highly authoritarian regimes? watch

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    China, Cuba, Iran to name a recent few.

    So what is it about revolutions that result in authoritarian/fascist/communist etc regimes?

    Discuss.
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    because authoritarian regimes are the only ones that are able to bring the revolution to an end.
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    People run to the political extremes (far left/right) in times of crisis and extremes are usually authoritarian?
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    Usually because it is a strongman of some sort who can bring the violence and disorder to an end, whereas with a violent revolution people will be less inclined to listen to a democratic regime because they realise that they can just overthrow it if they don't like its decisions.
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    (Original post by HearTheThunder)
    People run to the political extremes (far left/right) in times of crisis and extremes are usually authoritarian?
    Yep just like when the Germans voted for Hitler because he offered them policies to end their crisis
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    Because they are started by highly authoritarian people.
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    Another reason may be that a state which has experienced revolution is likely to be very unstable and vulnerable. Whether fascist/ communist/ other, once a revolution is successful the instigators often find themselves in a pretty dire position- sometimes with no sense of what happens next. With the only short-term aim being survival, drastic measures are taken. These can become long-term due to any number of factors- totalitarian leaders, people becoming accustomed to the way of life, etc.
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    Revolutions entail a drastic restructuring of the socio-economic system, which is bound to harm a large segment of the population, which would do everything in its power to resist these changes. Since democracy isn't possible when there is no stability, and since revolutions inevitably bring instability, it follows that revolutions must lead to dictatorship. After all, if the problems of the country could have been resolved through democratic means, there would be no need for the revolution in the first place, would there?

    P.S. There is huge amount of literature on the nature and effects of revolutions, so if you're really interested, you might want to look up a few articles/books. Don't ask me which ones though, as I never cared enough about this topic to do any research on it.
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    (Original post by Bismarck)
    P.S. There is huge amount of literature on the nature and effects of revolutions, so if you're really interested, you might want to look up a few articles/books. Don't ask me which ones though, as I never cared enough about this topic to do any research on it.
    I was slyly trying to get TSR D&Ders to do some research for my next essay which is due in about 4 weeks time. :p:
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    (Original post by Socrates)
    China, Cuba, Iran to name a recent few.

    So what is it about revolutions that result in authoritarian/fascist/communist etc regimes?

    Discuss.
    Do they always or even often? The three you mentioned all replaced authoritarian regimes, which may be connected. The "velvet revolutions" of eastern Europe- for all the faults of what followed them- replaced authoritarian regimes with less authoritarian ones.
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    (Original post by Weejimmie)
    Do they always or even often? The three you mentioned all replaced authoritarian regimes, which may be connected. The "velvet revolutions" of eastern Europe- for all the faults of what followed them- replaced authoritarian regimes with less authoritarian ones.
    Ah...you mean the "revolutions" which followed the fall of the Soviet regime? Would they be termed revolutions? What then, is a revolution?

    Interesting. Keep those answers coming.
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    (Original post by Weejimmie)
    Do they always or even often? The three you mentioned all replaced authoritarian regimes, which may be connected. The "velvet revolutions" of eastern Europe- for all the faults of what followed them- replaced authoritarian regimes with less authoritarian ones.
    I think people are being too generous with the term "revolution". It requires major socioeconomic changes, not merely a chance of the type of government (even if it goes from a dictatorship to a democracy).
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    The Great Day

    Hurrah for revolution and more cannon-shot!
    A beggar on horseback lashes a beggar on foot.
    Hurrah for revolution and cannon come again!
    The beggars have changed places, but the lash goes on.

    So the American Revolution wasn't a revolution, then, Bismarck?
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    Well just look at the French Revolution- the classic example. Over a 90 year period there were something like 8 different revolutions. Initially trying to be democratic but after a while it got to the point where anybody elected just got overthrown within a year. The sorts that did maintain power tended to be the ones who took it, not the ones who were given it. If you take it, you have to be pretty strong already. If you're given it, chances are you'r just good at making sure nobody hates you too much. And when you have mderates and extremist chances are you aren't going to please all of them.
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    An example- why the classic example, though? The Englisg glorious revolution might be considered more of classic example- if it is a revolution at all, of course.
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    (Original post by Weejimmie)
    An example- why the classic example, though? The Englisg glorious revolution might be considered more of classic example- if it is a revolution at all, of course.
    I wouldn't neccessarily call it a revolution - it was more a settlement or coup, since those that had been powerful before it generally still kept power after it. There was no major socio-economic change, perhaps why the Settlement of 1688 was widely regarded as as close to perfect as possible during the 18th century, with King and Parliament both relying on each other for stable government.
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    That's what I was thinking of- the way people assume taht if it isn't violent etc it isn't a revolution. The Glorious Revolution led to a codified Bill of Rights, guaranteed some religius toleration and exactly limited the powers of the monarchy, which was a pretty revolutionary thing to do.
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    Classic example because there were about 8 cases, it's more famous, there's a wider set of political groupings and philosophies involved. I just thought it was more illuminating that the English Revolution and more famous as far as revolutions go. Classical doesn't have to mean 'oldest' necessarily- at last not the way I use it
    But still revolution, counter revolution all very quickly, but notably the authoritarian regimes were the ones that kept power for any length of time at all.
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    (Original post by Weejimmie)
    That's what I was thinking of- the way people assume taht if it isn't violent etc it isn't a revolution. The Glorious Revolution led to a codified Bill of Rights, guaranteed some religius toleration and exactly limited the powers of the monarchy, which was a pretty revolutionary thing to do.
    Which coincidently seem to still have authority today, http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/h...cs/4450196.stm
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    (Original post by Howard)
    Because they are started by highly authoritarian people.
    Glad to hear you think so highly of your founding fathers :p:
 
 
 
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