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    I'm doing some research into gene therapy, and was wondering if anyone knows whether after a gene is inserted into the genome (via an altered viral vector) if that new gene stays in the genome permenantly, or just for one or two generations?
    Thanx a lot
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    Provided it is inserted into a germ cell then unless something happens to specifically remove it then it will remain in the genome permanently. Similarly if we're talking generations in term of somatic replication then the gene will remain in the genome because the genome is copied by SCR. Obviously if a somatic cell is modified then it won't be passed to offspring
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    Ahhhhh, yeah that’s what I thought but couldn’t work out why research indicates that it doesn’t stay effective for a decent length of time usually, but just found/realized that its because the target cells are oncological, so their replication is crazy and the inserted genes need their target cells to be stable and long lived to properly integrate. i.e. often only a small % of the initally changed cells pass their genome on accuretly to the next generation within cancerous tissue.
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    (Original post by Prometheus)
    I'm doing some research into gene therapy, and was wondering if anyone knows whether after a gene is inserted into the genome (via an altered viral vector) if that new gene stays in the genome permenantly, or just for one or two generations?
    Thanx a lot
    It depends on a number of factors. If the insert is unstable it might trigger the cell to apoptose, so the recombinant cell would die and the insert lost.

    If the cell recognises the insert shouldn't naturally be there it can 'recombine' it out.

    Or it could stay there stably forever - doesn't mean that it's going to be expressed though...

    As already pointed out if you target the germ line, in theory it will be passed down the generations. Somatic cell modification dies with the person.

    --------------

    (Original post by Prometheus)
    Ahhhhh, yeah that’s what I thought but couldn’t work out why research indicates that it doesn’t stay effective for a decent length of time usually, but just found/realized that its because the target cells are oncological, so their replication is crazy and the inserted genes need their target cells to be stable and long lived to properly integrate. i.e. often only a small % of the initally changed cells pass their genome on accuretly to the next generation within cancerous tissue.
    In deed - unstable inserts can disrupt cell cycle regulation, leading to uncontrolled cell division and cancer.

    Getting a gene into a foreign genome and in a controlled manner is no mean feat. That's the main issue with gene cloning at the moment...
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    (Original post by Prometheus)
    I'm doing some research into gene therapy, and was wondering if anyone knows whether after a gene is inserted into the genome (via an altered viral vector) if that new gene stays in the genome permenantly, or just for one or two generations?
    Thanx a lot
    Hmmm, it might stay in but could jump out again. If its delivered on a transposon then it can jump out. Also if the gene is just a wild type on to replace a mutant then the wild type will displace the mutant and recombine into the chromosome- however this could be reversed.
 
 
 

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