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bougeoursie_Roo
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#1
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#1
if H2O is the molecule of water
what would u call the O or H2 within that molecule?
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Juwel
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#2
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#2
It's actually split into a H (hydrogen atom) and an OH (hydroxyl something or other), I remember that from GCSE.
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bougeoursie_Roo
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(Original post by ZJuwelH)
It's actually split into a H (hydrogen atom) and an OH (hydroxyl something or other), I remember that from GCSE.
so atoms?
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thefish_uk
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#4
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#4
(Original post by bougeoursie_Roo)
if H2O is the molecule of water
what would u call the O or H2 within that molecule?
Hmmm... Well, it'd be either atoms or ions, depending on whether you consider atoms within a covalent molecule to have charge.

Covalent bonding involves sharing electrons so all atoms gain an electron in their outer shell, so that'd make it an ion as an extra electron means it is charged. But the electron is not the atom's to keep...

Put simply: I haven't got a clue.
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ShOcKzZ
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(Original post by thefish_uk)
Hmmm... Well, it'd be either atoms or ions, depending on whether you consider atoms within a covalent molecule to have charge.

Covalent bonding involves sharing electrons so all atoms gain an electron in their outer shell, so that'd make it an ion as an extra electron means it is charged. But the electron is not the atom's to keep...

Put simply: I haven't got a clue.
I do A-level chemistry and i'm guessing Hydrogen and oxygen atoms..so u'll have to believe me. (im probably wrong, but i like the hardcore chem, not the easy bits )
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]{ingnik
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#6
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(Original post by bougeoursie_Roo)
if H2O is the molecule of water
what would u call the O or H2 within that molecule?
SATS level- atoms
GCSE level- oxygen atom, pair of hydrogen atoms
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Chicken
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(Original post by ShOcKzZ)
I do A-level chemistry and i'm guessing Hydrogen and oxygen atoms..so u'll have to believe me. (im probably wrong, but i like the hardcore chem, not the easy bits )
Yep thats right - a water molecule contains hydrogen and oxygen atoms. However it can be split into ions - H+ and OH-, but i doubt thats what you want to know...
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gayboy09
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#8
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The chemical name for water is Dihydrogen oxide.
Draw your conclusions from that.

More info on water - polar molecule as O is more electronegative than H.
The O has a damn lone pair of electrons aswell.

No ions, they are atoms covalently bonded (well der), which means sharing an electron, creating a pair of electrons that form a bond (double der).

Gayboy09 is not as stupid as he looks, talks or smells.
Ok he is stupid.
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thefish_uk
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#9
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(Original post by ShOcKzZ)
I do A-level chemistry and i'm guessing Hydrogen and oxygen atoms..so u'll have to believe me. (im probably wrong, but i like the hardcore chem, not the easy bits )
Yeah, I get where you're coming from.
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Juwel
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#10
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(Original post by bougeoursie_Roo)
so atoms?
Whatever, I don't do those sciences anymore.
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Chicken
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#11
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(Original post by gayboy09)
No ions, they are atoms covalently bonded (well der), which means sharing an electron, creating a pair of electrons that form a bond (double der).

take it from a degree level chemist, water can be made into ions (as written in my post above).
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elpaw
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#12
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(Original post by thefish_uk)
Hmmm... Well, it'd be either atoms or ions, depending on whether you consider atoms within a covalent molecule to have charge.
They do have a charge, a formal charge, more commonly known as an oxidation number.

you could also say they have charge through polarisation, with the O slightly positive, and the Hs slightly negative.
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gayboy09
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#13
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(Original post by elpaw)
They do have a charge, a formal charge, more commonly known as an oxidation number.

you could also say they have charge through polarisation, with the O slightly positive, and the Hs slightly negative.
Blatant ignorance of me.

I said previously in my response that O was more electronegative than H, therefore causing the bond to be slighty polar - O being delta -, H being delta +.
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elpaw
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#14
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(Original post by gayboy09)
Blatant ignorance of me.
Yeah, i was treading down the page, replied to the first post i saw, and then read on seeing your post
I said previously in my response that O was more electronegative than H, therefore causing the bond to be slighty polar - O being delta -, H being delta +.
Isn't H delta - and O delta +?
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Chicken
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#15
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(Original post by elpaw)
Yeah, i was treading down the page, replied to the first post i saw, and then read on seeing your post

Isn't H delta - and O delta +?
Nope H is delta +ve and O is delta -ve. This is because oxygen is electronegative, and 'pulls' electrons towards it, giving it a slightly negative charge, hence the delta -ve.

However in some compounds H can be -ve too, just not in water.
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elpaw
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#16
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(Original post by Chicken)
Nope H is delta +ve and O is delta -ve. This is because oxygen is electronegative, and 'pulls' electrons towards it, giving it a slightly negative charge, hence the delta -ve.

However in some compounds H can be -ve too, just not in water.
but the hydrogen is basically just a proton, it is extremely positive, so it attracts the electrons in the bond, making the H delta -ve?
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Katie J
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#17
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#17
'The O has a damn lone pair of electrons aswell.' (I still can't do quoting like everyone else )

Make that 2 damn lone pairs!

H has 'lost' its electron to be +ive, its not going to want them back. O is more electronegative, grabing electrons as described by someone brainier than me earlier. Its far more stable being delta -.

Terrible joke in my chem text book...
Qu. Why are bonds like bears?
Ans. Some are polar some are not. (sorry)
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Chicken
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#18
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(Original post by elpaw)
but the hydrogen is basically just a proton, it is extremely positive, so it attracts the electrons in the bond, making the H delta -ve?
An H atom is not a proton, an H+ ion is a proton. Hydrogen has no influence in chemical bonds, only electronegative atoms (oxygen, nitrogen, flourine) can 'pull' electrons towards them to get a positive charge. Water is a polar substance because the oxygen pulls the electrons away from the hydrogens, making them delta +ve because they are slightly electron defficient. Only in some cases can you make the hydrogen negative (when it is used as an oxidising agent).
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viviki
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#19
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#19
(Original post by Chicken)
An H atom is not a proton, an H+ ion is a proton. Hydrogen has no influence in chemical bonds, only electronegative atoms (oxygen, nitrogen, flourine) can 'pull' electrons towards them to get a positive charge. Water is a polar substance because the oxygen pulls the electrons away from the hydrogens, making them delta +ve because they are slightly electron defficient. Only in some cases can you make the hydrogen negative (when it is used as an oxidising agent).
Chicken knows what she is talking about. hey I remember something from A Level Chemistry.
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