American Lawyer's in England Watch

This discussion is closed.
wander
Badges: 0
#1
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#1
Greetings,

I recently graduated from an American law school and am curious about working and studying law in England. Do any of you know what it takes for someone in my position to study law at Oxford? Do they offer advanced degrees, for someone who already has a J.D. from an American school? My undergraduate degrees are in English and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. I graduated with a 3.79 GPA and scored a 162 on the LSAT. I have no clue if those numbers mean anything to any of you, but am curious. I also did fairly well in law school -- my grades were not as high, probably a 3.45 average, but I was very involved, on law review and moot court.

Thanks for any information.
0
Petrozzi
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#2
Report 14 years ago
#2
(Original post by wander)
Greetings,

I recently graduated from an American law school and am curious about working and studying law in England. Do any of you know what it takes for someone in my position to study law at Oxford? Do they offer advanced degrees, for someone who already has a J.D. from an American school? My undergraduate degrees are in English and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. I graduated with a 3.79 GPA and scored a 162 on the LSAT. I have no clue if those numbers mean anything to any of you, but am curious. I also did fairly well in law school -- my grades were not as high, probably a 3.45 average, but I was very involved, on law review and moot court.

Thanks for any information.
To my knowledge, a 3.5 GPA is around the value of a 2:1. That said, it does make it feasible for you to study here. Though I do think Oxbridge will be picky, I think you should contact them directly since they will know exactly what your qualifications are equivelant to.

edit:http://www.ox.ac.uk

To give you an idea of some of the jobs...

http://www.doctorjob.com

Good luck.
0
Vitriol
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#3
Report 14 years ago
#3
Which law school? Tier 1? Top-14?

I think you qualify for the CPE/ PgDL which is the law conversion exam. No porint in doing an LLM if you intend to work in private practice.
0
wander
Badges: 0
#4
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#4
(Original post by Vitriol)
Which law school? Tier 1? Top-14?

I think you qualify for the CPE/ PgDL which is the law conversion exam. No porint in doing an LLM if you intend to work in private practice.
University of Washington -- we're top tier -- last year we were ranked 21st, this year our career services office sent in bad statistics, so we were told, and we fell to 44, but should bounce back in the next evaluation.
0
wander
Badges: 0
#5
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#5
(Original post by wander)
University of Washington -- we're top tier -- last year we were ranked 21st, this year our career services office sent in bad statistics, so we were told, and we fell to 44, but should bounce back in the next evaluation.

Also, thank you very much for the information, much appreciated.
0
BossLady
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#6
Report 14 years ago
#6
(Original post by wander)
Greetings,

I recently graduated from an American law school and am curious about working and studying law in England. Do any of you know what it takes for someone in my position to study law at Oxford? Do they offer advanced degrees, for someone who already has a J.D. from an American school? My undergraduate degrees are in English and Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. I graduated with a 3.79 GPA and scored a 162 on the LSAT. I have no clue if those numbers mean anything to any of you, but am curious. I also did fairly well in law school -- my grades were not as high, probably a 3.45 average, but I was very involved, on law review and moot court.

Thanks for any information.
Well if that's equivalent to a 2:1 I'm not sure you'd have such a great chance but I'm sure you've got lots of other great things in your favour e.g work experience. The thing with oxford is that they even turn away people with 1sts who want to study there. They can afford to, they are picking from the best. BUT it's always worth a shot, especially if you have something else that will stand out from the crowd, but it's gotta make up for the class of degree thing. Don't get me wrong a 2.1 equivalence in class is great, but if everyone else has 1sts well you may be at a disadvantage. Best way is certainly to contact them though.
There are some other great schools over here e.g Durham, LSE etc, not sure if they offer what you want tho.
0
wander
Badges: 0
#7
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#7
(Original post by BossLady)
Well if that's equivalent to a 2:1 I'm not sure you'd have such a great chance but I'm sure you've got lots of other great things in your favour e.g work experience. The thing with oxford is that they even turn away people with 1sts who want to study there. They can afford to, they are picking from the best. BUT it's always worth a shot, especially if you have something else that will stand out from the crowd, but it's gotta make up for the class of degree thing. Don't get me wrong a 2.1 equivalence in class is great, but if everyone else has 1sts well you may be at a disadvantage. Best way is certainly to contact them though.
There are some other great schools over here e.g Durham, LSE etc, not sure if they offer what you want tho.
Great to know, thank you. I will certainly look into the other programs and consider what I have to offer that might seperate me from the crowd. Is there any significance to being in an executive position on a law review? Law reviews are academic legal journals in which professors and some students publish articles on various legal topics. I published a rather dull bit of writing on a social security class action case here in Washington state (about 12,600 words). I think that is what would make me stand out the most (firms here like law review experience) but have no idea if it means squat there. It's really where I placed most of my energy in law school.

Anyway, thank you again.
0
Vitriol
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#8
Report 14 years ago
#8
(Original post by wander)
Great to know, thank you. I will certainly look into the other programs and consider what I have to offer that might seperate me from the crowd. Is there any significance to being in an executive position on a law review? Law reviews are academic legal journals in which professors and some students publish articles on various legal topics. I published a rather dull bit of writing on a social security class action case here in Washington state (about 12,600 words). I think that is what would make me stand out the most (firms here like law review experience) but have no idea if it means squat there. It's really where I placed most of my energy in law school.

Anyway, thank you again.
Law Review is a huge deal. I would imagine that universities here would consider it favourably. What course do you plan on applying for? Like I say, a UK LLM is really only useful if you wish to go into academia. It is not something that firms such as Allen & Overy, Slaughters etc. look for.
0
wander
Badges: 0
#9
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#9
(Original post by Vitriol)
Law Review is a huge deal. I would imagine that universities here would consider it favourably. What course do you plan on applying for? Like I say, a UK LLM is really only useful if you wish to go into academia. It is not something that firms such as Allen & Overy, Slaughters etc. look for.

Still considering, likely something with an international human rights focus if possible. I'm not certain I want to practice, at least not for long. I much prefer teaching. Are you in practice/school?
0
Vitriol
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#10
Report 14 years ago
#10
(Original post by wander)
Still considering, likely something with an international human rights focus if possible. I'm not certain I want to practice, at least not for long. I much prefer teaching. Are you in practice/school?
Doing my law conversion course now (CPE). I start my training contract with an American firm in London next year. I liked the idea of law school in America before I realised that I couldn't afford it.
0
muncrun
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#11
Report 14 years ago
#11
"American Lawyer's in England"

Perhaps you ought to sort out your grammar before applying.
0
J.S.
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#12
Report 14 years ago
#12
(Original post by BossLady)
Well if that's equivalent to a 2:1 I'm not sure you'd have such a great chance but I'm sure you've got lots of other great things in your favour e.g work experience. The thing with oxford is that they even turn away people with 1sts who want to study there. They can afford to, they are picking from the best. BUT it's always worth a shot, especially if you have something else that will stand out from the crowd, but it's gotta make up for the class of degree thing. Don't get me wrong a 2.1 equivalence in class is great, but if everyone else has 1sts well you may be at a disadvantage. Best way is certainly to contact them though.
There are some other great schools over here e.g Durham, LSE etc, not sure if they offer what you want tho.

Would depend on what you'd like to do at Oxford. I know for the BCL even with a first you have only a reasonable chance. Washington is well regarded though. There's also the second BA (in Law) at Oxford, which is at least as competitive-infact it'd probably require a near perfect grade score. Law at grad. level is competitive, the Oxford law faculty have much of this info. up on the web. The other school that Americans seem to love is the LSE, again a very competitive LLM, at which 3.7 seems to be the level they're after.

I would probably try some of the other London colleges, UCL being the next best bet. I know for a fact UCL is a hell of a lot easier to get into for the LLM than the LSE. Also, it's highly regarded, although contrary to popular opinion within the walls of University College, it's not so well known internationally, which is partially why it's easier in getting into. After that, you'd get into any of the other law schools, Durham, Nottingham, Warwick, Bristol et al, they're all very highly regarded here but largely unheard of in the US.
0
wander
Badges: 0
#13
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#13
(Original post by muncrun)
"American Lawyer's in England"

Perhaps you ought to sort out your grammar before applying.
:eek: Dear lord above, someone hit the submit button before checking the header. I hope I haven't offended... thanks to all for replying despite the typo.
0
J.S.
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#14
Report 14 years ago
#14
(Original post by wander)
:eek: Dear lord above, someone hit the submit button before checking the header. I hope I haven't offended... thanks to all for replying despite the typo.

Sorry, you have offended, I have lost several hours of sleep because of this. Next time do ensure a more thorough approach to submitting your post.

Thank you.
0
wander
Badges: 0
#15
Report Thread starter 14 years ago
#15
(Original post by J.S.)
Sorry, you have offended, I have lost several hours of sleep because of this. Next time do ensure a more thorough approach to submitting your post.

Thank you.

I hang my head in shame and will immediately resign from the legal profession.

Godspeed.
0
Muffle
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#16
Report 14 years ago
#16
(Original post by wander)
I hang my head in shame and will immediately resign from the legal profession.

Godspeed.
lol.

and goodluck
0
X
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Brexit: Given the chance now, would you vote leave or remain?

Remain (1332)
79.67%
Leave (340)
20.33%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise