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kashiya
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Since the terms in Cambridge are so short I keep wondering how you can actually make yourself feel there at home?

From the information in other threads I understand that only few people choose to stay in college during break-time. This means that students spend more than half a year out of Cambridge. I am an international mature to-be-student and I had my share of traveling and living in different places and was hoping to find a place, where I could feel at home, a place i could call 'mine', at least for some time... Is that at all possible in Cambridge? How do you cope with this constant back and forth?

Would be great if you could share your experience ^^"
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User592005
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i'm an international student aiming for cambridge as well (though it'll take some time, still an undergrad), and i was worried that by just doing a MASt i would miss out on the true cambridge experience, if there's such a thing. so right now i'm planning to do an MASt and then a PhD at cambridge, though it won't be that easy of course

anyway, just wanted to say i feel your concerns and am interested in the replies.
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dd4483
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I know what you mean, its annoying.

But then again, you do have the option of living in your accomodation all year round. I've heard mature colleges are good if you choose to do this, since a lot of students are postgraduates who have much longer terms.
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Topaz_eyes
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Maybe for postgrads you can stay all year round, but I don't know any undergrads who do - including international students. In my college the freshers get 3x10 week contracts, and unless you have a good reason no-one stays for longer.

I definitely feel at home in Cambridge, despite the short terms. Time feels very different, and a few weeks into Michaelmas I felt like I'd been here forever!

The constant back and forth isn't a massive issue for me, I just feel a bit like I'm leading a double life - home seems very far away when I'm here, and Cambridge feels like a dream when I'm at home.

If you're going to a mature college they might be more likely to do year-long contracts on accommodation, but I don't know. It would also get pretty lonely, from what I've heard everything sort of stops student-life-wise.
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Hermione17
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There are quite many international students in Cambridge (24%), so you two are not a minority. I guess the international students often choose to stay for the shorter breaks.

From which country are you from? There are societies like Chinese Society, Malaysian Society, etc. Those societies often held many events, so I guess you will feel at home by staying
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kashiya
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#6
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
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(Original post by dd4483)
I know what you mean, its annoying.
hey dd4483, could you maybe expand a little on 'it's annoying'?

(Original post by Topaz_eyes)
I just feel a bit like I'm leading a double life - home seems very far away when I'm here, and Cambridge feels like a dream when I'm at home.
Topaz_eyes thank's for the great answer That double-life is exactly my problem, I have the feeling that since graduating from high school (which is a few years back) i was traveling so much that i am permanently in this dream-like state, so i was looking for some stability... not sure if cambridge can offer that though...
the college i got admitted to allows students to stay for as long as they want, but it is quite expensive - summer holidays cost 2.700 pounds...

(Original post by Hermione17)
From which country are you from?
tricky question...
I have a Polish passport.
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Hermione17
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(Original post by kashiya)
tricky question...
I have a Polish passport.
Naprawde? Cze??!

edit: seems like I can't type in Polish here
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jjarvis
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(Original post by kashiya)
Since the terms in Cambridge are so short I keep wondering how you can actually make yourself feel there at home?

From the information in other threads I understand that only few people choose to stay in college during break-time. This means that students spend more than half a year out of Cambridge. I am an international mature to-be-student and I had my share of traveling and living in different places and was hoping to find a place, where I could feel at home, a place i could call 'mine', at least for some time... Is that at all possible in Cambridge? How do you cope with this constant back and forth?

Would be great if you could share your experience ^^"
Mature colleges have more accommodation that will last from October to June and won't require you to move out between terms. And term is very intense, so it does tend to feel like you acclimate very quickly.
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Craghyrax
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This won't be a problem if you're a mature student. You can live here all year round and alot of other mature students and grads in your college will too, so you won't be alone.
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SunderX
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For me, Cambridge feels much more like home than where I go back to (Shanghai). I just love the city and how everything slots together. The only things that make me feel at home when I go back is the apartment (because I lived there before I went to uni) and my family.

As said before, for mature accommodation you'll almost certainly be able to get longer leases to stay over the holidays. Cambridge will feel emptier then though, although that might be good or bad depending on your perspective.
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Zoedotdot
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Put it this way - I'm on my year abroad and will be going back to the UK for a week next Saturday. Despite living 20 minutes from Heathrow, my parents won't be picking me up because I'm going straight to Cambridge, and will be staying there for most of the week. It's definitely just as much my home as my parents' home in London, and despite the short terms I always feel like I spend the majority of my year at Cambridge, and the rest of it talking about it
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gethsemane342
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I know some international students who stay for most holidays because they live too far away to feasibly go home.

To be honest i found for the first term that Cambridge just felt like a different city and it wasn't until I came back for third term that it felt like i was coming home. And since then, it feels a lot like home - just as much as Wales does. They just feel like home in different ways
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kashiya
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Thanks for the great answers!!

Ok, so assuming I stay there all year round. Is it possible to get a job during the summer in Cambridge (maybe at University) to pay for the rent? (otherwise it would feel like wasted time a little)
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around
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(Original post by kashiya)
Ok, so assuming I stay there all year round. Is it possible to get a job during the summer in Cambridge (maybe at University) to pay for the rent? (otherwise it would feel like wasted time a little)
It's quite easy for scientists/engineers especially - the uni often does summer research internships (I'm not sure about funding, but from what I heard there is some available). Also, if you feel up to it you can get a job as a punt tour guide, especially if you speak a foreign language.
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Canned Door
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Isn't it perfectly possible to feel at home in multiple places? You feel at home because of the people as well as the place, and so by maintaining strong ties with different places, you keep them as different homes. Consequently though, I find, as an undergrad going between "home" home and Cam, it definitely helps in feeling at home in both places that when term ends, most of my friends leave Cambridge, so it makes less sense to stay there. I'm also itching to get back to Cologne, but I was only there for a month last summer, and know very few people there at the moment. But when I spend my Year Abroad there, I'm sure it will also become Home proper.
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kashiya
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(Original post by Canned Door)
Isn't it perfectly possible to feel at home in multiple places? You feel at home because of the people as well as the place, and so by maintaining strong ties with different places, you keep them as different homes. Consequently though, I find, as an undergrad going between "home" home and Cam, it definitely helps in feeling at home in both places that when term ends, most of my friends leave Cambridge, so it makes less sense to stay there. I'm also itching to get back to Cologne, but I was only there for a month last summer, and know very few people there at the moment. But when I spend my Year Abroad there, I'm sure it will also become Home proper.
i had the same opinion like you a few years back, but time and the life-style i chose changed my mind about that.
i'm not saying that being on the go at a young age isn't fun - it widens your horizon and the world becomes a whole different place. but eventually you can get tired with the fact that you fit nowhere properly.
i'm not going to preach here, i think you will be able to understand a bit more of what i'm talking about after your year in Colone Btw. i hear it's a really cool city, great clubs, i'm sure you will have lot's of fun there.
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Zoedotdot
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(Original post by kashiya)
i had the same opinion like you a few years back, but time and the life-style i chose changed my mind about that.
i'm not saying that being on the go at a young age isn't fun - it widens your horizon and the world becomes a whole different place. but eventually you can get tired with the fact that you fit nowhere properly.
i'm not going to preach here, i think you will be able to understand a bit more of what i'm talking about after your year in Colone Btw. i hear it's a really cool city, great clubs, i'm sure you will have lot's of fun there.
I've been in Moscow for six months and couldn't disagree more. My family home will always be a base, my college will always be an incredibly special place for me and somewhere where I will feel safe and at home, and I feel completely like I belong in Moscow as it's a city that suits me right down to the ground. I feel like I fit in all of those places properly, and I know that as soon as I go back to my family home or back to my college home I am going to slot back into life there just fine, because I belong in both of those places too. My dad and aunty both spend their time country hopping for their respective jobs, and each of them feels able to make a home wherever they are. I think if you're in a place long enough to put down some roots and get to know it then it can be another home. I wouldn't particularly like to lead a very nomadic lifestyle, and maybe that's what you're referring to. But splitting your life between Cambridge and home and then doing a year abroad isn't like that, you just end up with three bases rather than one
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kashiya
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(Original post by Zoedotdot)
I've been in Moscow for six months and couldn't disagree more. My family home will always be a base, my college will always be an incredibly special place for me and somewhere where I will feel safe and at home, and I feel completely like I belong in Moscow as it's a city that suits me right down to the ground. I feel like I fit in all of those places properly, and I know that as soon as I go back to my family home or back to my college home I am going to slot back into life there just fine, because I belong in both of those places too. My dad and aunty both spend their time country hopping for their respective jobs, and each of them feels able to make a home wherever they are. I think if you're in a place long enough to put down some roots and get to know it then it can be another home. I wouldn't particularly like to lead a very nomadic lifestyle, and maybe that's what you're referring to. But splitting your life between Cambridge and home and then doing a year abroad isn't like that, you just end up with three bases rather than one
that's exactly my concern - are 9x3 weeks enough?
yeah, i had a pretty nomadic lifestyle i guess - a little out of the normal...
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Zoedotdot
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(Original post by kashiya)
that's exactly my concern - are 9x3 weeks enough?
yeah, i had a pretty nomadic lifestyle i guess - a little out of the normal...
Absolutely Cambridge is an INCREDIBLY intense environment, and I certainly found I developed a rapport with people extremely quickly and when I left to go home after my first term was much closer to some of the friends I'd made at Cambridge than some of those I'd spent seven years at school with. It really is like a pressure cooker, and while that means you can be very stressed, it also means that everyone is carried along with it, and within the first few weeks I'd seen most of my friends go through the whole range of emotions. Plus, being packed in all together in university accommodation means that you get close to people very quickly because you see them literally all the time.

I think because so much happens during term as well it always feels like much longer than 9 weeks which makes a difference. You just get sucked into this whirlwind, barely think about anything outside Cambridge for the whole of term and then it spits you out the other end, you spend the whole holiday languishing exhaustedly and then chuck yourself back in again. It's an utterly bizarre place but the whole experience becomes so ingrained in you right from the get go that you simply can't help being totally involved.
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kashiya
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(Original post by Zoedotdot)
Absolutely Cambridge is an INCREDIBLY intense environment, and I certainly found I developed a rapport with people extremely quickly and when I left to go home after my first term was much closer to some of the friends I'd made at Cambridge than some of those I'd spent seven years at school with. It really is like a pressure cooker, and while that means you can be very stressed, it also means that everyone is carried along with it, and within the first few weeks I'd seen most of my friends go through the whole range of emotions. Plus, being packed in all together in university accommodation meant that you get close to people very quickly because you see them literally all the time.

I think because so much happens during term as well it always feels like much longer than 9 weeks which makes a difference. You just get sucked into this whirlwind, barely think about anything outside Cambridge for the whole of term and then it spits you out the other end, you spend the whole holiday languishing exhaustedly and then chuck yourself back in again. It's an utterly bizarre place but the whole experience becomes so ingrained in you right from the get go that you simply can't help being totally involved.
have you considered writing novels?
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