Path to becoming a Chartered Accountant advice needed Watch

ChocolateWar
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
What I am unsure about is whilst doing the qualification do I specialise in one area? Or do I train in multiple areas? The ACA website says:

"There areas of accountancy you can specialise in include:
  • Audit and assurance
  • Business recovery/insolvency
  • Corporate finance
  • Financial accounting
  • Forensic accounting
  • Financial Management
  • Information Technology
  • Tax"


I am unsure which area I would like to specialise in without having any experience in any of them. And if I were to train in one area would this affect my chances of getting a job in another area later in my career?

A few more questions, When should I start applying for training contracts at firms? And should I apply to as many as I can incase of rejections from certain firms?

Also, If you have done the school leavers route to becoming ACA qualified, how did you find it?

One more... Does it help to have any work experience in an accounting firm to secure a training contract?
0
quote
reply
MissFanatical
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
kpmg offer a school leavers programme - the details are on their website
1
quote
reply
Planar
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
Deloitte has one as well
0
quote
reply
ChocolateWar
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#4
Thanks for the replies

I never knew they offered the chance to go university to get a degree(with them paying the fees :eek: I think it is only KPMG who does this though) and to obtain the ACA qualification. I was under the impression on the ACA website you just jumped into the getting the ACA qualification at a firm.
0
quote
reply
Staker
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
NAO do this too
0
quote
reply
simstar
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#6
Report 7 years ago
#6
I doubt I could hack doing the ACA without going to uni, not because I learnt stuff related to it but just the pure load of studying.
0
quote
reply
ChocolateWar
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#7
(Original post by simstar)
I doubt I could hack doing the ACA without going to uni, not because I learnt stuff related to it but just the pure load of studying.
I don't quite understand what your saying. You say about the work load but why would going to uni benefit you when it comes to work load? At the end of the day you will still have to do just as much?

Im not sure if I've explained that very well
0
quote
reply
S
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#8
Report 7 years ago
#8
Plenty of firms have a school leaver programme now, some of which involves doing the AAT-ACA fast track. EY and KPMG have those programmes combining work experience with a degree. You should definitely shop around to see which firm offers the best deal. Also, don't just look at the Big 4. Browse the top 10-20 firms on Accountancy Age.

As for when you should start applying - start now. A lot of places are allocated on a first come, first serve basis.

(Original post by simstar)
I doubt I could hack doing the ACA without going to uni, not because I learnt stuff related to it but just the pure load of studying.
I think you could do it. Your perspective changes when study becomes a requirement of the job. The consequences for failing an exam (paying for a resit/being fired) will motivate you.
1
quote
reply
simstar
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
(Original post by ChocolateWar)
I don't quite understand what your saying. You say about the work load but why would going to uni benefit you when it comes to work load? At the end of the day you will still have to do just as much?

Im not sure if I've explained that very well
Its similar to GCSE's they're easy in comparison to A Levels, then when I went to uni I realised that a levels are easy. Now I'm doing the ACA it feels like the next step, juggling a hectic day of work and then studying a vast amount for an exam next week!

It just feels like that step up again if you know what I mean, you would be jumping right up and it could be a shock.
0
quote
reply
ChocolateWar
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#10
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by simstar)
Its similar to GCSE's they're easy in comparison to A Levels, then when I went to uni I realised that a levels are easy. Now I'm doing the ACA it feels like the next step, juggling a hectic day of work and then studying a vast amount for an exam next week!

It just feels like that step up again if you know what I mean, you would be jumping right up and it could be a shock.
I understand your point now
0
quote
reply
simstar
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
(Original post by ChocolateWar)
I understand your point now
I don't want to put you off, just saying how I would have found it, you may find it easier.
0
quote
reply
ChocolateWar
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#12
(Original post by simstar)
I don't want to put you off, just saying how I would have found it, you may find it easier.
Don't worry, I think firms must take this into consideration because normally if you go straight from school you qualify in a longer time (4-5years) to the normal 3. And I'm fairly certain I don't wan't to go university due to the £6000+ fees so I'll just have to manage
0
quote
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Were you ever put in isolation at school?

Yes (146)
27.6%
No (383)
72.4%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed