Was Tony Blair one of "the greatest"? Watch

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Daveo
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#61
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#61
(Original post by BossLady)
Nah, Brown really isn;t seen by the public as the most powerful man in the country. TB has more connections and I reckon gives a better overall impression. It's nice TB has some competiton thugh, it'll make him work harder to get things right. I have a feeling if GB made PM, he's be more concerned about the status than leading the gov and our country.

Certainly we are not as bad as Europe and America, but we were saved quite a deal by our Housing Boom which was one thing that did help keep the economy afloat. With everyone else heading for recession, our consumers carried on spending, whilst the BoE(which is independant of the gov) finely tuned interest rates to encourage them to do this, so keeping our economy in a decent state. Companies managed to make up lost sales from overseas, by selling to the domestic market and although our growth deccelerated, our economy didn't contract. But what did Mr Brown have to do in all of this, he had to calculate the figure that would balance our budget. His predicitions were way over what we achieved in terms of econ growth and his little spending spree turned into a bit of an 'oopsie' for our lovely budget deficit. A budget deficit which is getting no better, although our economy is picking up its growth rate.
Brown would make a good leader! At least he wouldnt be Bush's lapdog! and at least we wouldnt see the Euro!

As for the econonmy! Browns predictions were not very wrong! And who gave the Interest rates decisions to the BoE? Yes Mr Brown!
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BossLady
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#62
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#62
(Original post by Daveo)
Brown would make a good leader! At least he wouldnt be Bush's lapdog! and at least we wouldnt see the Euro!

As for the econonmy! Browns predictions were not very wrong! And who gave the Interest rates decisions to the BoE? Yes Mr Brown!
I agree that TB is very much Bush's lapdog but who's to say GB wouldn't do the same. That we would have to wait and see on.


Actually, Gordon Brown doesn't tell the BoE what to do with interest rates. Sorry mate i don't know here you got the info from but the whole point was that labour (i think it was labour) made the BoE totally independant of the government so that it wouldn't base the IRs on political decisions. This is also one of the reasons why people have lower inflation rate expectations.
The only time Mr brown gets involved is that if we miss the inflation target by more than a certain amount( for the RPI it was plus/minus 1%, not sure if it is the same for the HICP), then Mervyn king, the BoE governor has to write a letter to mr brown explaining why. As to the decisions taken by the BoE, they are taken without mr Browns involvement, so as no political agendas get mixed up in it. The BoE actually votes on Interest rate changes (without Mr brown).
See http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/3416583.stm
Notice how they vote, and mr brown doesnt get mentioned because he has no say.
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Daveo
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#63
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#63
(Original post by BossLady)
I agree that TB is very much Bush's lapdog but who's to say GB wouldn't do the same. That we would have to wait and see on.


Actually, Gordon Brown doesn't tell the BoE what to do with interest rates. Sorry mate i don't know here you got the info from but the whole point was that labour (i think it was labour) made the BoE totally independant of the government so that it wouldn't base the IRs on political decisions. This is also one of the reasons why people have lower inflation rate expectations.
The only time Mr brown gets involved is that if we miss the inflation target by more than a certain amount( for the RPI it was plus/minus 1%, not sure if it is the same for the HICP), then Mervyn king, the BoE governor has to write a letter to mr brown explaining why. As to the decisions taken by the BoE, they are taken without mr Browns involvement, so as no political agendas get mixed up in it. The BoE actually votes on Interest rate changes (without Mr brown).
See http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/3416583.stm
Notice how they vote, and mr brown doesnt get mentioned because he has no say.
Yes i know Brown has no say in this but it was his economic policy that gave that right to the BoE! It was his idea when Labour came to power to give sol control of interest rates to the BoE!

And Brown doesn't like bush so he's unlikly to be his lapdog.
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BossLady
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#64
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#64
(Original post by Daveo)
Yes i know Brown has no say in this but it was his economic policy that gave that right to the BoE! It was his idea when Labour came to power to give sol control of interest rates to the BoE!

And Brown doesn't like bush so he's unlikly to be his lapdog.
It was his economic policy that gave the BoE independance but he can't really take credit for the interest rate changes that the BoE have carried out, because they are much more qualified on this matter and are the ones voting. If the government and GB had been involved in the BoE and the IR decisions I imagine our economy wouldn't have been as stable as it is now because politicians always get influenced by political agendas anyways. I think the thing here is that at the start, in 97 GB was pretty good at running the economy, he seemed to have good ideas and back then even had a nice handy budget surplus along with deciding on making the BoE independant. But his economic policies have deteriorated somewhat since then and his predicitions have been a little OTT. However, he was saved by a much earlier action he took (ie BoE independance) which thankfully cushioned the economy. That still does not excuse his handling of the budget though, and he needs to sort it out!
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Tednol
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#65
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What?! At this monent in time, 56.67% of people think Tony Blair was indeed a 'Great' PM. Why? What on earth has he done that is great?
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LH
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#66
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(Original post by Elle)
Yes he'll be remembered because he's a war monger like Thatcher and Churchill.
That's a bit harsh on Churchill, he was trying to save the world!
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cherub_rock
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#67
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#67
(Original post by elpaw)
I'm not talking about whether TB was a good prime minister, whether you liked him or not, i'm just asking, is he one of "the greatest"? What this means is will he be remembered in say 20, 50 or 100 years time? in the future, if people are asked "can you name a past prime minister", will he be one of the more popular options? (if you think about it, if you asked someone now, the most popular options would be Churchill and Thatcher, hardly anyone (with general knowledge) would mention Asquith or Chamberlain - so Churchill and Thatcher are one of "the greatest"). Will Tony Blair be remembered in the future?


Yes he will be remembered.... as the biggest **** stain to ever live.
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Tednol
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#68
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(Original post by Elle)
Yes he'll be remembered because he's a war monger like Thatcher and Churchill.
Pardon? Do you know how World War 2 started? If anything, the UK entered the war too late. Hardly war mongering...

What were you refering to anyway?
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hattori
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#69
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#69
(Original post by elpaw)
I'm not talking about whether TB was a good prime minister, whether you liked him or not, i'm just asking, is he one of "the greatest"? What this means is will he be remembered in say 20, 50 or 100 years time? in the future, if people are asked "can you name a past prime minister", will he be one of the more popular options? (if you think about it, if you asked someone now, the most popular options would be Churchill and Thatcher, hardly anyone (with general knowledge) would mention Asquith or Chamberlain - so Churchill and Thatcher are one of "the greatest"). Will Tony Blair be remembered in the future?
Just by looking at the last couple of years I'm pretty sure he'll be remembered. He'll be in histroy textbooks around the world. I'm pretty sure any future PM will be compared to Tony Blair's charisma and how he always manages to pull through. Blair is like a real life Blackadder and for that, he is the don.
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foowise
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#70
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I've got to say I think Tony Blair is a great PM, and he's proved it quite often lately. He's willing to propose controversial policies, such as the top-up fees, because he believes them to be right for the country. He's the leader and therefore the one who has to make these calls, controversial though they may be, and his ability to do so is something I admire. Granted, I don't agree with everything he says, but he is a very capable, intelligent man who knows what he is doing. Seeing his performance in parliament today, I saw a man with confidence who essentially destroyed Michael Howard. Blair has the kind of charisma and eloquence that Gordon Brown, great chancellor though he is, lacks -
Blair's closing lines of his first speech had me applauding.


I have to say I think Blair is an asset for this country, some may call him Bush's laptop, but c'mon Blair's a smart guy, an Oxford grad, so give him a bit of credit. The PM of this country is always gonna get stick, but I think some of it elevated at Blair has been in for a bit too much. I'm thankful that the tuition fees were passed, albeit with only a 5 vote majority - because it is what this country and its universities need.

I understand people citing debt as a reason opposing it, but isn't it true that most grads earn significantly more than non-grads? and isn't it also true that you don't actually pay the fees till AFTER you graduate? and only if you earn £15,000 or more? and isn't it also true how after 25 years the debt is written off? and isn;t it also true that clarke has imposed some concessions (around £2,700 grants for poorer students?) I'm a student and have the same concerns that you all have about debt etc, but I sense that some people are instantly anti-top up fees without knowing the facts. The stark truth is our universities are SERIOUSLY underfunded and they need more money ASAP. You don't get anything for nothing, peeps - if you don't give money to the unis, standards will fall and world-class researchers and lecturers will go elsewhere. Britain will soon lag behind the other world economies as our workers are less skilled. You don't get something for nothing, and I think that is what a lot of ppl fail to recognise. Ideally, I would have rather Clarke had not added the concessions as essentially, you are still depriving the unis from money.

I myself find the prospect of debt horrifying, but in the long run, I believe a university education will benefit me, and if i have to pay a bit for something which will hopefully earn me more, then I am willing to do so. So, I say well done Blair, and you have my vote at he next general election.
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