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    (Original post by jamiepango)
    Half the people will say: I want to become an investment banker
    then they're better off doing maths
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    (Original post by jamiepango)
    Half the people will say: I want to become an investment banker
    I think I'd kill myself if I ended up as one of those -_-

    (Original post by hockeyjoe)
    then they're better off doing maths
    They're probably not good enough at it...
    I'm certainly not >_>
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    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    I think I'd kill myself if I ended up as one of those -_-



    They're probably not good enough at it...
    I'm certainly not >_>
    well surely the answer to that is to get good enough at it?
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    How much weight does oxford place on the tsa?
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    (Original post by hockeyjoe)
    well surely the answer to that is to get good enough at it?
    I think with maths, you can either do it or you can't. You can get good at passing A level maths, but if you don't have the mathematical brain, you'll struggle at University.
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    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    I think with maths, you can either do it or you can't. You can get good at passing A level maths, but if you don't have the mathematical brain, you'll struggle at University.
    I think that if you want to study maths, you'll do lots of maths, and end up getting good at it eventually. Thinking is developed it isn't an innate thing. What does it mean to have a "mathematical" brain? If by that you mean that problem solving and the like are encouraged at a young age, that just means that you do more of it subconsciously as your life progresses, how is that very different from practising, learning and progressing..
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    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    I think with maths, you can either do it or you can't. You can get good at passing A level maths, but if you don't have the mathematical brain, you'll struggle at University.
    you beefing with M Solo?
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    (Original post by hockeyjoe)
    I think that if you want to study maths, you'll do lots of maths, and end up getting good at it eventually. Thinking is developed it isn't an innate thing. What does it mean to have a "mathematical" brain? If by that you mean that problem solving and the like are encouraged at a young age, that just means that you do more of it subconsciously as your life progresses, how is that very different from practising, learning and progressing..
    there's a reason maths degrees are so highly respected.

    I'm not saying you can't make yourself good at maths, but when you have students in their first year going to third year lectures, you know you're outclassed. Perhaps we're talking about different levels of mathematic aptitude? I'm only talking about the very top - that third year lecture example is a story from cambridge.
    (Original post by Mousebudden )
    you beefing with M Solo?
    Sorry, I'm not good with these things, what's a M Solo?
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    Is it fair to say that people have a better chance of getting into Economics rather than Maths with Economics? Simply because the spaces for Maths with Economics at any particular Uni is signifigantly less than the spaces for straight Economics.
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    (Original post by Mousebudden)
    Is it fair to say that people have a better chance of getting into Economics rather than Maths with Economics? Simply because the spaces for Maths with Economics at any particular Uni is signifigantly less than the spaces for straight Economics.
    Depends what unis.

    For unis below the top 5, getting into Maths or Maths & Economics courses are easier than straight Economics courses.
    However in the top 5, particularly the top 3, it's harder to get into a Maths or Maths & Econ course.
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    (Original post by Mousebudden)
    Is it fair to say that people have a better chance of getting into Economics rather than Maths with Economics? Simply because the spaces for Maths with Economics at any particular Uni is signifigantly less than the spaces for straight Economics.
    IMO i'd say no , economics with the exception of Cambridge at most top unis will almost certanly have candidates will A* at gcse. Maths with eco will have some but not as many .

    Just my opinion
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    (Original post by Confused101)
    Depends what unis.

    For unis below the top 5, getting into Maths or Maths & Economics courses are easier than straight Economics courses.
    However in the top 5, particularly the top 3, it's harder to get into a Maths or Maths & Econ course.
    You reckon UCL maths with economics will be harder getting into than straight economics ?
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    (Original post by Confused101)
    Depends what unis.

    For unis below the top 5, getting into Maths or Maths & Economics courses are easier than straight Economics courses.
    However in the top 5, particularly the top 3, it's harder to get into a Maths or Maths & Econ course.
    That being said, would you consider it a smart or lazy move to apply for solely straight economics if your intention is to study an economics oritentated course at a a top uni?
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    (Original post by wachno)
    How much weight does oxford place on the tsa?
    I've been told it's one of the most importNt parts of your application
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    (Original post by falcon pluse)
    You reckon UCL maths with economics will be harder getting into than straight economics ?
    Sorry I'm not sure =/ Try calling UCL and ask about the applicant to offer ratio of both courses, and check out the requirements of both.


    (Original post by Mousebudden)
    That being said, would you consider it a smart or lazy move to apply for solely straight economics if your intention is to study an economics oritentated course at a a top uni?
    Don't see why that would be a "lazy" move...if Economics is what you want to do, you should apply for it. If there's a particular course you really want to do you should apply for it.
    If it's solely career prospects you're looking for (i.e. salary, particular job...) then perhaps it'll be "smart" to apply for a less competitive course at a top uni.

    It's just about working out what you want out of university and life. Then you can go from there.
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    (Original post by StarChamber)
    That can be a factor. But often rejected candidates may be better than those pooled from another college.

    What you must remember though, and I stick by my original comment, that of the 180 best candidates, many will not always get in. Why? Cambridge is not like LSE or UCL. Cambridge colleges look for different things. Many place emphasis on interview performance and others on UMS scores etc... There is not one policy.

    It is likely that the best candidates of each college will get in and the pool tries to even things out.
    While this is not the official line, I agree and believe this to be closer to the truth.

    (Original post by Groat)
    Well it'd be nice to see how they rank candidates, how much weighting is placed on each component, and any other interesting bits of information you can offer!
    They used to give the official line on this in the Cambridge Admissions Handbook (which was fully available online).
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    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    there's a reason maths degrees are so highly respected.

    I'm not saying you can't make yourself good at maths, but when you have students in their first year going to third year lectures, you know you're outclassed. Perhaps we're talking about different levels of mathematic aptitude? I'm only talking about the very top - that third year lecture example is a story from cambridge.


    Sorry, I'm not good with these things, what's a M Solo?
    level of maths is irrelevant,
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    (Original post by -Illmatic-)
    You would have to email the individual admissions tutors with regards to retakes. As for SOAS letting you off, I'm really not sure: you'd also have to email them, im sure the admissions tutor will give you the relevant info!
    Alright, thanks for the info
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    Economics and Cambridge, UCL, Warwick, Bath and one other (maybe LSE, Durham or Nottingham)
    Sounds really good! What did you get at AS and which subjects?
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    (Original post by wachno)
    How much weight does oxford place on the tsa?

    (Original post by tooambitious)
    I've been told it's one of the most importNt parts of your application
    Well I've been told as long as you get an average score you'll be fine. The rest of the application (especially the interviews) are way more important. It is mainly used to differentiate between candidates that are very similar in all other aspects, e.g. interview performace and grades.
 
 
 
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