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    (Original post by ...mo...)
    I wanted to go speak to my AS maths teacher. However he has retired.... so I don't know.

    Thanks anyway
    They generally predict us one up in our school...but people usually do badly in the first year and get their act together the next so it may not be the same everywhere...

    In response to your previous question, I would advise you to take Economics, even if it is a BA. Sometimes the importance of the type of degree is exaggerated. Getting a 2.1 is all you really have to worry about.
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    (Original post by Psychotic546)
    What's the policy with declaring uncertified module grades? If you have done the module can you put in the grade or do you leave it as "pending"?
    If you have the module result then put it down...
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    If you have the module result then put it down...
    Surely if it's uncertificated you don't actually have a grade? Wouldn't putting one's grades down in this case be deemed as lying? :confused:
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    (Original post by 94george94)
    Surely if it's uncertificated you don't actually have a grade? Wouldn't putting one's grades down in this case be deemed as lying? :confused:
    But you have a module grade? :confused:
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    i heard some colleges in cambridge dont accept the A* in maths, does anyone have a list of these colleges?
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    But you have a module grade? :confused:
    I was under the assumption that you don't actually have the grade until you cash it in.

    Could be wrong...UCAS website doesn't say much about uncertified ASs...
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    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    I was under the assumption that you don't actually have the grade until you cash it in.

    Could be wrong...UCAS website doesn't say much about uncertified ASs...
    This is what I thought actually. Don't want to put it down then get told I lied on my UCAS form
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    (Original post by Psychotic546)
    This is what I thought actually. Don't want to put it down then get told I lied on my UCAS form
    Only way to be certain is to ask UCAS directly...
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    (Original post by ...mo...)
    Oh my. REALLY?

    C1 - 78%
    C2 - 83%
    S1 - 79%

    Overall - 80%

    Will I be predicted a B since it gets harder at A2?
    i think you are talking about UMS, so averaging 80 ums, should be enough for an A grade prediction. Plus Maths is a fairly easy a-level-just modules, so you could if you pulled your act together get an A* overall.But you should get an A grade prediction.
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    Would you guys be applying to courses with "year in industry" as offered? Or just applying to straight economics. Which ones tend to be more competitive? Which ones tend to be better post graduating?
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    Is anyone else put off by the lack of mathematical content in Durham's Econ degree? :unimpressed:
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    (Original post by 94george94)
    Is anyone else put off by the lack of mathematical content in Durham's Econ degree? :unimpressed:
    Mee!! I'm still applying though... But I suppose you can choose some mathematical modules if you want to?
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    (Original post by nightmare91)
    Mee!! I'm still applying though... But I suppose you can choose some mathematical modules if you want to?
    Have you looked at the modules? Barely any with a heavy maths basis i.e. Econometrics.

    Yeah I'm still applying though
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    How much maths is their normally in economics. How much is there In Bsc economics compared to Ba economics
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    (Original post by ...mo...)
    How much maths is their normally in economics. How much is there In Bsc economics compared to Ba economics
    Quite a bit, it's a lot different to Economics at A-Level, it tends to be a lot more quantative.
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    (Original post by 94george94)
    Quite a bit, it's a lot different to Economics at A-Level, it tends to be a lot more quantative.
    Quantative? what is that. The thing is that I am not great at Maths so am not sure if I will do well at degree level, (2:1 or higher.) Should I apply for accounting and finance which is less mathmatical?
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    (Original post by ...mo...)
    Quantative? what is that. The thing is that I am not great at Maths so am not sure if I will do well at degree level, (2:1 or higher.) Should I apply for accounting and finance which is less mathmatical?
    Quantitative just means to do with numbers. It depends what Uni you go for, but Economics is a maths based degree.

    Go with what you enjoy more, I couldn't think of anything worse than spending 3 years (not to mention about £35k+) on a degree you aren't enjoying.
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    Does anyone know how different the mathematical difficulty is between an Econ degree and a Finance one? :/ I love concepts in Econ but I'm not that great in Maths either.
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    (Original post by 94george94)
    Quantitative just means to do with numbers. It depends what Uni you go for, but Economics is a maths based degree.

    Go with what you enjoy more, I couldn't think of anything worse than spending 3 years (not to mention about £35k+) on a degree you aren't enjoying.
    It's not really about enjoyment since I like them both. Just wondering what would look better on a CV

    1st in Accounting and finance
    2.1 in economics

    ?
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    (Original post by ...mo...)
    Quantative? what is that. The thing is that I am not great at Maths so am not sure if I will do well at degree level, (2:1 or higher.) Should I apply for accounting and finance which is less mathmatical?
    Quantitative means that it is mathematical and not qualitative which means rather essay-based. Yea maths is the language of economics today. It used to be different 100 years ago that's why it was considered an art back then. Today it is a science.

    Paul Samuelson, a great economist who basically introduced mathematics into economics once said:

    "... the problems of economic theory- such as the incidence of taxation, the effects of devaluation- are by their nature quantitative questions whose answers depend upon the superposition of many different pieces of quantitative and qualitative information. When we tackle them by words, we are solving the same equations as when we write up the equations. [...] no sensible person who had at his command both the techniques of literary argumentation and mathematical manipulation would tackle by words alone a problem... The convenience of mathematical symbolism for handling certain deductive interferences is, I think, indisputable."

    I love that quote

    If you think you can't handle the maths, go for A&F. Because economics is maths. And a bad 2:1 or 2:2 doesn't look as good as a 1st in A&F. But if you enjoy economics more, then go for that.
 
 
 
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