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    (Original post by MWM)
    Hmm, thanks I guess the root of my question is that if someone wanted to strictly avoid all jobs based on interest and insurance (due to religious reasons) would actuary be suitable for them. So when you say financial firms and actuarial firms, once you get in what do you think you will be doing exactly.
    Thanks.
    I don't know to be honest. I think you'll struggle to find an actuarial job that doesn't have some connection with interest or insurance, at the very least these things will probably be considered in your analysis. But I think you'll have to ask someone with more knowledge about this, both on the firms and the restrictions imposed by your religion.

    (Original post by Tateco)
    Get a response from whoever you were waiting for today?
    Yesterday. Was (as expected) rejected though. I screwed up the non-interview parts of the AC.
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    Yesterday. Was (as expected) rejected though. I screwed up the non-interview parts of the AC.
    Sorry to hear that, hope one of your other applications works out well for you!
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    Hmm, the only one I could find on TSR is a rather more simple one (about the relation between TR, AR and MR):
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Due to economies and diseconomies of scale, TR could be represented by a curve with the equation:

    TR = a - (Q-b)^2
    where Q is quantity and a and b are constants such that a = b^2 (so that TR = 0 when Q = 0).

    Differentiating this will give the MR curve (because by definition it is the gradient of the TR curve):

    MR = -2(Q-b)

    or: MR = 2b -2Q

    AR is simply \frac{TR}{Q} for each value of Q:

    AR = \displaystyle\frac{a - (Q-b)^2}{Q}
    which simplifies to: AR = \displaystyle\frac{a - b^2}{Q} + 2b - Q

    but a = b^2 so:

    AR = 2b - Q

    Comparing the equations for the AR and MR curve, it is clear that they have the same value (2b) when Q = 0, and that the gradient of the MR curve is twice that of the AR curve.

    It can also be seen what the constants represent:
    a = maximum revenue (top of total revenue curve)
    2b = marginal revenue (and average revenue) when Q = 0

    I might have just done the others on paper, it was four or five years ago so I really can't remember.
    Pretty neat

    I have a similar proof dealing with most of these, I'll post it soon. :cool:
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    (Original post by MWM)
    I have done A level maths and I found your mathematical explanations to be nice and clear. Did you come up with all that by yourself ? I would be very impressed if you did.
    Good, and yes for the most part I did. If they were nice and clear to follow, you can probably guess they weren't hugely difficult to work out.
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    For all those students who have done AS Edexcel or OCR Economics could you have a look at this thread?

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...php?p=35434931

    Thanks.
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    Just a quick question, has there been any offers from UCL yet? Or any interviews? Beginning to think silence is a rejection for me :')
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    (Original post by Abbyyyyyyy)
    Just a quick question, has there been any offers from UCL yet? Or any interviews? Beginning to think silence is a rejection for me :')
    Yes. Groat and Lordvulture.
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    (Original post by Abbyyyyyyy)
    Just a quick question, has there been any offers from UCL yet? Or any interviews? Beginning to think silence is a rejection for me :')
    and Moiraclaire also has one
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    (Original post by WalkerPrince)
    Some of you may find this interesting... (or tell me if I did anything wrong)

    These are some fun proofs in Micro-economics

    http://www.langtoneconomists.co.uk/F..._The_Firm.html
    Some of these are nice, but they don't necessarily need to be proved mathematically in order for A level students to understand them. All of these assumptions can be derived intuitively. I do however think that they should use maths in A level economics - it would be far more fun!

    Here is another one proving that MC is the inverse supply function (supply curve) in a perfectly competitive market.

    profit = PQ - C(Q)

    differentiating the profit function w.r.t Q and setting P as a constant (since each firm is a price taker and has no influence over the market price) gives

    P - C'(Q) = 0 at maximum

    Therefore P = C'(Q) = MC
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    I am so envious of you lot with your proofs...I can understand the logic but would never be able to come up with them myself

    A level economic is supposed to be accessible to those not doing maths...kind of ruins it but I suppose I understand. Not everyone taking economic wants to do it at university...
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    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    I am so envious of you lot with your proofs...I can understand the logic but would never be able to come up with them myself

    A level economic is supposed to be accessible to those not doing maths...kind of ruins it but I suppose I understand. Not everyone taking economic wants to do it at university...
    Physics at A-Level is really only accessible to those doing Maths, personally I think they should change the Economics course!
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    (Original post by funkydee)
    Physics at A-Level is really only accessible to those doing Maths, personally I think they should change the Economics course!
    I can see why they haven't, if everything is taught as it should be then all the sciences would be cut off from people that can't do Maths at all. This way, people interested in Arts subjects which still link in (like History with Economics) can still learn about it without being restricted by their mathematical ability.
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    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    I am so envious of you lot with your proofs...I can understand the logic but would never be able to come up with them myself

    A level economic is supposed to be accessible to those not doing maths...kind of ruins it but I suppose I understand. Not everyone taking economic wants to do it at university...
    I agree with this. The A-level economics course is designed to help people understand basic principles of economics, basic theory and modern-day application. It isn't designed as a stepping stone (although it often is) to university level economics, where the subject is incredibly mathematical. The spec. at A-level needs to be accessible to all those interested in learning about the subject, whether to aid them in understanding other social sciences or general interest.

    Also, those wishing to take the subject at uni. will tend to look at the subject more mathematically anyway and may learn the proofs independently of curricular studies to give them a better understand or something, which is exactly what has been done on this thread.
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    I can see why they haven't, if everything is taught as it should be then all the sciences would be cut off from people that can't do Maths at all. This way, people interested in Arts subjects which still link in (like History with Economics) can still learn about it without being restricted by their mathematical ability.
    I concur
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    (Original post by stefl14)
    Some of these are nice, but they don't necessarily need to be proved mathematically in order for A level students to understand them. All of these assumptions can be derived intuitively. I do however think that they should use maths in A level economics - it would be far more fun!

    Here is another one proving that MC is the inverse supply function (supply curve) in a perfectly competitive market.

    profit = PQ - C(Q)

    differentiating the profit function w.r.t Q and setting P as a constant (since each firm is a price taker and has no influence over the market price) gives

    P - C'(Q) = 0 at maximum

    Therefore P = C'(Q) = MC
    That's fine too, but the maths is just enlightened intuition. :cool:
    That was a neat proof.

    Something far tougher that I am trying to work out is this -
    How can you show mathematically that : If the monopolist is able to perfectly segment the market (perfect price discrimination), then the average revenue curve becomes the marginal revenue curve.
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    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    I am so envious of you lot with your proofs...I can understand the logic but would never be able to come up with them myself

    A level economic is supposed to be accessible to those not doing maths...kind of ruins it but I suppose I understand. Not everyone taking economic wants to do it at university...
    (Original post by funkydee)
    Physics at A-Level is really only accessible to those doing Maths, personally I think they should change the Economics course!
    I agree, Economics shouldn't be changed too much at A-Level. Physics is that way because there simply is no other way to do Physics without maths.
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    So Bath have also decided to hold my application until after Jan 15th.

    I guess the wait goes on :moon:
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    (Original post by jamiepango)
    So Bath have also decided to hold my application until after Jan 15th.

    I guess the wait goes on :moon:
    Why am I not getting any of these holding emails?!
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    Why am I not getting any of these holding emails?!
    Hmm I'm not sure. This one was received about half an hour ago. I didn't get a UCL one though...
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    (Original post by jamiepango)
    Hmm I'm not sure. This one was received about half an hour ago. I didn't get a UCL one though...
    Just got it... :mad:
 
 
 
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