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    (Original post by -Illmatic-)
    Lol I get what you mean. Is the Cambridge econ course a mixture of essay/quantitative stuff? Its obv renowned for being highly mathematical but I guess when it comes to things such as British econ history and political/sociological aspects of econ, theres not much maths?
    Pretty sure the first year is mostly essays, which I'm glad about as that should kick me into place!

    (Original post by tooambitious)
    Oh no exam technique, that's how geography foiled me at GCSE
    Me too :yes:
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    Pretty sure the first year is mostly essays, which I'm glad about as that should kick me into place!
    Ah okay, sounds good
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    (Original post by -Illmatic-)
    Ah okay, sounds good
    my school was invited to queens camb and I spoke to an econ student, he said is about two essays a week, which doesn't sound bad but he said they're quite long and you have to do loads of prep reading

    (Original post by Tateco)
    Pretty sure the first year is mostly essays, which I'm glad about as that should kick me into place!

    Me too :yes:
    Let's hope it's not the same this year
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    I'm the same, I don't plan either, I think I'm slowly getting the hang of it though. At the Tutor2U lecture they told us that when doing a higher mark essay question it is better to focus on 2/3 significant points and go into deep analysis and evaluation, and then just throw everything else that is relevant into the conclusion. That way you show your understanding of complex concepts and ability to explain and analyse them, but you also show you have the knowledge and have done the preparation by throwing everything else in
    Which Tutor2u lecture did you go to?
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    (Original post by -Illmatic-)
    I dont care what anyone says. AS Economics is not even about knowledge, its about exam technique. If you can master that (which I couldnt), you'll do well. To an extent, it rewards exam tech rather than actual capability (but I would say that seeing as I got a B lololol)
    This is true to an extent of all exams apart from maths.
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    (Original post by stefl14)
    This is true to an extent of all exams apart from maths.
    Very true. Which is why I'm decent at Maths lol!

    (Original post by tooambitious)
    my school was invited to queens camb and I spoke to an econ student, he said is about two essays a week, which doesn't sound bad but he said they're quite long and you have to do loads of prep reading
    Ah ok
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    Pretty sure the first year is mostly essays, which I'm glad about as that should kick me into place!



    Me too :yes:
    Why are you glad about this! Despite being okay at essays, I would rather do some mathematical economics by far!
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    (Original post by stefl14)

    Why are you glad about this! Despite being okay at essays, I would rather do some mathematical economics by far!
    Because essay writing is a key skill
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    Because essay writing is a key skill
    True. I just hate doing them compared to maths. Still, it's unavoidable so i'll have to cope.
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    (Original post by stefl14)
    This is true to an extent of all exams apart from maths.
    Don't agree with this. Maths exams are pretty much the same every time with different numbers put in, if you can do one paper you'll have the technique to do the others.
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    I did both Biology and Chemistry, and Biology definitely took up a lot of my time but the exams were very easy, chemistry has similar exams to biology but it is more difficult in that it is more applied and not just regurgitating knowledge. Economics varies a lot across the boards, I think the OCR board is more similar to a typical exam with lots of smaller questions and then one or two big ones at the end. I did AQA which has 1/3 marks multiple choice (pretty much guaranteed nearly full marks if you do lots of past papers) and then 2/3 of the marks on a data response, which includes quite a tricky 25 mark essay. If you are planning to do A2 level economics eventually then I'd say avoid AQA, as in A2 they drop the multiple choice section and slam in loads more essays, and when essays aren't your forte (like me) then it hurts, but I suppose it's a good thing as it's forcing me to work on that...
    Thanks for the detailed reply

    Lol bad choice picking biology, chem is alright though. But I got to do bio and chem to A2
    Yeah the AQA exams seem similar to the edexcel ones, but I don't think the edexcel AS had many multiple choice questions.

    I think I will stick to OCR, it seems like a nice board to do the A level in.
    I'm alright in essays but I do find them annoying, and although it will prepare me for uni level economics, I'd rather not do too many essays at A level haha
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    (Original post by 94george94)
    Don't agree with this. Maths exams are pretty much the same every time with different numbers put in, if you can do one paper you'll have the technique to do the others.
    definitely agree with this - Maths is about technique as much as other exams. Doing past papers, you see the same stuff come over again and again, just with different numbers - for example, integration and differentiation, simpson's rule - all the same, but with different numbers.

    Admittedly the higher end questions require you to think a bit more, but that's the same with all questions. From experience, I'd say Physics is the least about technique, although there is still a bit in the lower mark questions.
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    (Original post by Tomatochuckers)
    Thanks for the detailed reply

    Lol bad choice picking biology, chem is alright though. But I got to do bio and chem to A2
    Yeah the AQA exams seem similar to the edexcel ones, but I don't think the edexcel AS had many multiple choice questions.

    I think I will stick to OCR, it seems like a nice board to do the A level in.
    I'm alright in essays but I do find them annoying, and although it will prepare me for uni level economics, I'd rather not do too many essays at A level haha
    I do OCR - I think it's an alright exam board for economics - at AS, you have a load of data response questions (so 1-4 markers) e.g "Looking at figure 1 (which will likely be a table) what trends do you notice, and what likely reasons are there for this" - really obvious. You get a few knowledge questions as well "What is meant by a public good?" (no more than 2 or possibly 3 if you have to give an example) then you'll have about three longer questions (5, 6, 8 marks) which are usually, comment, discuss and explain questions, in which you need to give a two sided argument (OCR emphasise this a lot - you can't gain many marks in the longer mark questions otherwise) and you can usually gain about 3 -4 marks for a diagram. Then there is an 18 marker at the end, which is basically show your knowledge (so if the question is about subsidies, define a subsidy, give examples), then analysis - what will be the likely effects of the subsidy, and the extent to which it will be effective, has to be two sided, should probably cover 3 very good analysis points, and throw in a couple of other ones as well, then evaluate (come to a conclusion).
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    (Original post by FDR)
    I do OCR - I think it's an alright exam board for economics - at AS, you have a load of data response questions (so 1-4 markers) e.g "Looking at figure 1 (which will likely be a table) what trends do you notice, and what likely reasons are there for this" - really obvious. You get a few knowledge questions as well "What is meant by a public good?" (no more than 2 or possibly 3 if you have to give an example) then you'll have about three longer questions (5, 6, 8 marks) which are usually, comment, discuss and explain questions, in which you need to give a two sided argument (OCR emphasise this a lot - you can't gain many marks in the longer mark questions otherwise) and you can usually gain about 3 -4 marks for a diagram. Then there is an 18 marker at the end, which is basically show your knowledge (so if the question is about subsidies, define a subsidy, give examples), then analysis - what will be the likely effects of the subsidy, and the extent to which it will be effective, has to be two sided, should probably cover 3 very good analysis points, and throw in a couple of other ones as well, then evaluate (come to a conclusion).
    Be careful with that comment. If you look into some of the evaluative questions (mainly F582) they don't want two-sided discussions.
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    (Original post by Groat)
    Be careful with that comment. If you look into some of the evaluative questions (mainly F582) they don't want two-sided discussions.
    Are you sure? I guess 'explain' questions don't need them, but I'm certain 'Comment on..' and 'Discuss...' questions (especially 6+ marks) will require a two sided argument - I remember this, because in F581 I did quite badly, so got my paper back, and I hadn't really argued both ways, so focussed on this for F582 (Which I got 100 in )
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    (Original post by FDR)
    Are you sure? I guess 'explain' questions don't need them, but I'm certain 'Comment on..' and 'Discuss...' questions (especially 6+ marks) will require a two sided argument - I remember this, because in F581 I did quite badly, so got my paper back, and I hadn't really argued both ways, so focussed on this for F582 (Which I got 100 in )
    A few examples of F582:

    For 16 – 18 marks, a discussion must have some depth to the discussion on the factors influencing the effectiveness of the policy measure.

    For 16+ marks, the discussion must have some depth and width, bringing out the factors that influence the extent to which economic growth may benefit an economy.

    For 16+ marks, the discussion must have some depth to the factors influencing the effects and their relative likelihood.
    A few examples of F581:

    For a discussion of the case for and against regulations as a means of correcting market failure - (17-18) Final judgement on the extent to which regulations are effective when compared with other methods to correct market failure.

    A balanced answer is required, with discussion of some of the points stated above.
    For 16+ marks, the controversial nature of a cut in fuel taxes should be clearly recognised and there should be a judgement on whether the industry or the environmental case has more substance, in which case fuel prices should be increased.

    For a two sided discussion which makes clear whether health care is best provided by the government or by the private sector. A second case is where the answer questions whether health care is really a merit good.
    The command word tends to be different between F581 and F582 for the 18 mark question.
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    (Original post by Groat)
    The command word tends to be different between F581 and F582 for the 18 mark question.


    A few examples of F582:

    For 16 – 18 marks, a discussion must have some depth to the discussion on the factors influencing the effectiveness of the policy measure.

    For 16+ marks, the discussion must have some depth and width, bringing out the factors that influence the extent to which economic growth may benefit an economy.

    For 16+ marks, the discussion must have some depth to the factors influencing the effects and their relative likelihood.

    I presume your right - it's not necessarily arguing for and against, but "...the extent to which economic growth may benefit an economy" and "...the effects and their relative likelihood" means you have to discuss why something may not have the desired effect - I mean you wouldn't have just written an answer saying, for example, why supply side policies will promote economic growth, but you would argue that that whether it does promote economic growth depends upon where the spare capacity within the economy, where the AD curve sits,...that such a policy may not be effective at all, and that the effects are usually felt over the longer term...

    So whilst it isn't arguing for and against, to gain the marks, you will have to question a policy - I can't imagine you could gain 18 marks by listing why a policy would work.
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    (Original post by FDR)
    I presume your right - it's not necessarily arguing for and against, but "...the extent to which economic growth may benefit an economy" and "...the effects and their relative likelihood" means you have to discuss why something may not have the desired effect - I mean you wouldn't have just written an answer saying, for example, why supply side policies will promote economic growth, but you would argue that that whether it does promote economic growth depends upon where the spare capacity within the economy, where the AD curve sits,...that such a policy may not be effective at all, and that the effects are usually felt over the longer term...

    So whilst it isn't arguing for and against, to gain the marks, you will have to question a policy - I can't imagine you could gain 18 marks by listing why a policy would work.
    Yes. There's a difference between arguing both ways (offering a balanced discussion) as you should in F581, and recognising the limitations or alternatives as you should do in F582.
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    (Original post by Groat)
    Yes. There's a difference between arguing both ways (offering a balanced discussion) as you should in F581, and recognising the limitations or alternatives as you should do in F582.
    By recognising a limitation of a policy, you are still offering a balanced discussion, because you are looking at not only why a policy will be effective, but also why it may not be effective.

    The questions, as you rightly point out, do differ - in F581, the 18 markers are usually whether a policy should be introduced, so in terms of offering a balanced argument, you have to argue why it should and should not be introduced. In f582, the questions are usually discuss the extent to which a policy will be effective, so in terms of offering a balanced argument, you have to write about how it will be effective, but also how it won't be effective - but in the end, whether it be Micro or Macro economics, you can't get away without a balanced answer.
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    (Original post by FDR)
    By recognising a limitation of a policy, you are still offering a balanced discussion, because you are looking at not only why a policy will be effective, but also why it may not be effective.

    The questions, as you rightly point out, do differ - in F581, the 18 markers are usually whether a policy should be introduced, so in terms of offering a balanced argument, you have to argue why it should and should not be introduced. In f582, the questions are usually discuss the extent to which a policy will be effective, so in terms of offering a balanced argument, you have to write about how it will be effective, but also how it won't be effective - but in the end, whether it be Micro or Macro economics, you can't get away without a balanced answer.
    I still disagree. Your argument does not need to be balanced in F582, nor does offering a limitation qualify a balanced discussion. F582 focuses more upon making a justified judgement to which factors influence the effectiveness the most.
 
 
 
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