Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jamiepango)
    Simplified writing is confusing You would think having learnt traditional writing that the simplified characters would be easier to read... Also, I find that if you go long periods without practising, you just forget all the words that you learn.
    Aww, erm don't you find you can just sortof guess for the prefixes and stuff because they look the same-ish! I completely agree, if someone came up to me and started speaking Chinese there'd be alot of stuttering and murmuring because I actually begin to string a real sentence together. At least I know the word for Economics... that'll get me far... right? :awesome:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dat Guy)
    Just asked my maths teacher who looked at C1 and C2. He disagreed, saying they were not the easiest, but not the hardest either. Also, he mentioned that papers were ready ages ago and wouldn't have been changed just because Michael Grove said something
    *Michael Gove
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by jamiepango)
    Simplified writing is confusing You would think having learnt traditional writing that the simplified characters would be easier to read... Also, I find that if you go long periods without practising, you just forget all the words that you learn.
    Yeah, I find that I have to keep looking back at some of the ones I've learnt. The ones that I see everywhere are fine, but the less commonly used ones less so.

    (Original post by Brand New Eyes)
    That's the stuff, you'll probably know more than me by the end of the year ! Ahw I'm guessing that they're not chinese seeing as you know... Chinese people wouldn't need to learn their own language. Right?
    Yeah, it was a beginner class so all 外国人 (foreigners).

    (Original post by Brand New Eyes)
    Haha, sounds legit, standard American logic. ignoring the GBP? ahw hell nawh!
    They should make a British edition. :yep:

    (Original post by Brand New Eyes)
    :lol: I don't think exams are too easy I mean there are only so many questions you can ask for both science and art subjects, maybe the grade boundaries are too low because they let a certain percentage get a certain grade. :holmes:
    By 'too easy', I meant that people were getting too high marks (well, grades to be more precise), not that the questions were intrinsically too easy.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    x
    I was discussing this with a friend a couple of days ago, its not necessarily a bad thing if exam are made harder, from an economics point of view...do you agree?
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by -Illmatic-)
    I was discussing this with a friend a couple of days ago, its not necessarily a bad thing if exam are made harder, from an economics point of view...do you agree?
    I think it's useful to think about what it is we want an exam to achieve, which comes down to two main things: firstly, how much knowledge and understanding does the candidate have on the subject; and secondly, how does the candidate rank compared to others. The problem with the current exam system is that too many people score highly (which is perhaps because they have a good knowledge and understanding of the subject) and so it is very difficult to discriminate at the higher end. If exams were made harder (or marked more strictly, or the UMS conversion was done more harshly) then this would help solve the second problem. Personally, I would like to see raw marks and percentiles given as well as the overall grade / UMS. As for the economics point of view, it's about efficiency - if you have a university course / job / etc. that needs someone with a certain ability, but you can't distinguish them from someone with a lower ability, you'll often end up not choosing the most suitable person.
    • PS Helper
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    I don't understand why they don't just make the grade boundaries so a set % get each grade each year, I don't understand how there can be grade inflation if they do this? :confused:
    • PS Helper
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by thegenius31416)
    Date application sent: 19/12/11
    Date of offer: 17/01/12
    University: Bristol
    Course code/name: L101 Economics with Study in Continental Europe (Germany)
    Offer: A*AA
    GCSEs: 8A*s 3As
    AS Levels: AAAAB
    Predicted grades: A*A*A*A
    :woo: that was your first choice right?
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by Tateco)
    I don't understand why they don't just make the grade boundaries so a set % get each grade each year, I don't understand how there can be grade inflation if they do this? :confused:
    They don't do this because they claim that it doesn't reflect the increased quality of teaching and so increased education level of the students. The government encourages this so that they can say "oh look, the results are improving, it must be because children are getting smarter due to our brilliant education policy".
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    I think it's useful to think about what it is we want an exam to achieve, which comes down to two main things: firstly, how much knowledge and understanding does the candidate have on the subject; and secondly, how does the candidate rank compared to others. The problem with the current exam system is that too many people score highly (which is perhaps because they have a good knowledge and understanding of the subject) and so it is very difficult to discriminate at the higher end. If exams were made harder (or marked more strictly, or the UMS conversion was done more harshly) then this would help solve the second problem. Personally, I would like to see raw marks and percentiles given as well as the overall grade / UMS. As for the economics point of view, it's about efficiency - if you have a university course / job / etc. that needs someone with a certain ability, but you can't distinguish them from someone with a lower ability, you'll often end up not choosing the most suitable person.
    I agree with you to some extent. I feel a lot of exams favour those with good technique rather than ability but that does not mean you do not require understanding of the subject. Although, from the viewpoint of a student about to sit three exams, the stress levels are already high enough to gain high UMS and the introduction of A* at a level is daunting so I feel as though the system has flaws but I wouldn't say it's a walk in the park. If we start to see people getting four A*s or more frequently, you may be correct and then the next statistic to distinguish candidates may be required. However, as of now I feel it is not neccesary. Just my opinion
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    Of the universities I've applied for, it's the most quantative course. Cambridge has economic history, etc.

    Simply put, my writing skills just don't cut it. :lol:

    Oh, and lordvulture, I'll probably be deffering entry until 2013.
    did you apply for deferred when you submit UCAS? If not, how do you defer it?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lordvulture)
    did you apply for deferred when you submit UCAS? If not, how do you defer it?
    I didn't apply for deffered entry, so I'll have to ask.

    You send a letter asking for premission. The earlier the better according to Groat, since the do sometimes say no.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    I think it's useful to think about what it is we want an exam to achieve, which comes down to two main things: firstly, how much knowledge and understanding does the candidate have on the subject; and secondly, how does the candidate rank compared to others. The problem with the current exam system is that too many people score highly (which is perhaps because they have a good knowledge and understanding of the subject) and so it is very difficult to discriminate at the higher end. If exams were made harder (or marked more strictly, or the UMS conversion was done more harshly) then this would help solve the second problem. Personally, I would like to see raw marks and percentiles given as well as the overall grade / UMS. As for the economics point of view, it's about efficiency - if you have a university course / job / etc. that needs someone with a certain ability, but you can't distinguish them from someone with a lower ability, you'll often end up not choosing the most suitable person.
    being in the middle of a bunch of exams myself, I see the current exams only serve to show that 1. you are not retarded 2. you are willing to work hard for the exams, it doesn't prove much otherwise... to really tell apart the intelligent, you need things like the STEP exams, but even those aren't perfect, as it depends too much luck...

    A-level exams (or any other for that matter) is all about doing pastpaper and markschemes... ability really doesn't come much into this (above a certain IQ threshold) :P
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    I didn't apply for deffered entry, so I'll have to ask.

    You send a letter asking for premission. The earlier the better according to Groat, since the do sometimes say no.
    oh i c thanks, I probably won't take one then if its any effort

    and Groat is everywhere haha
    • PS Helper
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    They don't do this because they claim that it doesn't reflect the increased quality of teaching and so increased education level of the students. The government encourages this so that they can say "oh look, the results are improving, it must be because children are getting smarter due to our brilliant education policy".
    I thought that but then if they're arguing that then surely they can't moan that grade inflation is an issue?
    • PS Helper
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    I didn't apply for deffered entry, so I'll have to ask.

    You send a letter asking for premission. The earlier the better according to Groat, since the do sometimes say no.
    Definitely the earlier the better, what do you plan To do in your gap year?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tateco)
    Definitely the earlier the better, what do you plan To do in your gap year?
    Just make some money. London is quite an expensive place to live in.
    • PS Helper
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    Just make some money. London is quite an expensive place to live in.
    Just through doing a normal part time job?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    I didn't apply for deffered entry, so I'll have to ask.

    You send a letter asking for premission. The earlier the better according to Groat, since the do sometimes say no.
    I would e-mail the undergrad course tutor or undergrad admissions to enquire about it. It's generally easier for non-quant subjects like History or Govt. to get granted deferred entry but slightly harder for quant subjects -- the reasoning being that, at your age, a year out of practising math techniques is likely to affect your ability to do well on the course. But of course this can be rectified with some gentle revision in the gap year and working hard throughout the 3 years of your course.

    If you're a UK student, LSE run a bursary scheme for students based on household income. There are also other types of 'hardship funds' available if you're suddenly screwed and can't afford food. Obviously the main difference is accommodation costs. But otherwise, food, drinking etc. London is expensive but not much more than other cities if you find the right places.
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    (Original post by Tateco)
    I thought that but then if they're arguing that then surely they can't moan that grade inflation is an issue?
    They're playing it both ways - blaming the exam boards for the grade inflation but wanting to be able to point to the results to back up their policies (or, just as importantly, not given the opposition the opportunity to point to the results to claim that their policies are not working).
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tateco)
    Just through doing a normal part time job?
    Yes. I'll probably do some AS subjects as well if I do decide to take a gap year.

    (Original post by Overmars)
    I would e-mail the undergrad course tutor or undergrad admissions to enquire about it. It's generally easier for non-quant subjects like History or Govt. to get granted deferred entry but slightly harder for quant subjects -- the reasoning being that, at your age, a year out of practising math techniques is likely to affect your ability to do well on the course. But of course this can be rectified with some gentle revision in the gap year and working hard throughout the 3 years of your course.

    If you're a UK student, LSE run a bursary scheme for students based on household income. There are also other types of 'hardship funds' available if you're suddenly screwed and can't afford food. Obviously the main difference is accommodation costs. But otherwise, food, drinking etc. London is expensive but not much more than other cities if you find the right places.
    Thanks for the info. Like I said above, if I do decide to take a gap year, I'll do an AS in further additional maths or whatever it's called. That should help with the maths problem.
 
 
 
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: May 4, 2012
Poll
Are you going to a festival?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.