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    (Original post by tateco)
    I'm doing target 2.0! It's not a waste of time at all, it's probably one of the only extra curriculars you can do which directly relates to economics.
    Are you going to be in the team? We have to compete against each other and the teacher picks the best team to represent us haha... I see where you're coming from, just a bit frustrating as some people in my class have no desire to learn and the lesson moves so slowly...

    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Presentation skills are about one of the most important things in the business world, by no means a waste of time.
    I fully agree! It's just that we're doing presentations almost every lesson so it gets a bit tedious
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    (Original post by jamiepango)
    Are you going to be in the team? We have to compete against each other and the teacher picks the best team to represent us haha... I see where you're coming from, just a bit frustrating as some people in my class have no desire to learn and the lesson moves so slowly...



    I fully agree! It's just that we're doing presentations almost every lesson so it gets a bit tedious
    Yes I am There is about 12 people that want to do it but my teacher said thinks I'd be good at it. I know what you mean about the lessons moving slowly... about 75% of the class just don't care, hopefully it will change at A2.
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    (Original post by tateco)
    Yes I am There is about 12 people that want to do it but my teacher said thinks I'd be good at it. I know what you mean about the lessons moving slowly... about 75% of the class just don't care, hopefully it will change at A2.
    Ahh maybe I'll see you there Yes, we have 2 classes but are of mixed ability, but about a half will drop next year so hopefully smaller classes will help
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    (Original post by jamiepango)
    Ahh maybe I'll see you there Yes, we have 2 classes but are of mixed ability, but about a half will drop next year so hopefully smaller classes will help
    If we both get through regionals My class layout is exactly the same
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    (Original post by tateco)
    Still a very strong set, where you thinking of applying?

    How is everyone getting on with A2 economics and maths?

    I've personally only had a few lessons of each but they seem good so far!
    I'm thinking of Warwick, Nottingham and City, and still need to find two more, we have to take 4 A2 levels next year for some reason on top of an extended project! It's got to the stage after exams now where everything that is being taught in Maths, Chemistry and Physics is just going over my head, but C3 seems ok, in Economics we've just taken two weeks out of the spec and started talking about the financial crisis and how it happened, seems quite interesting
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    Hi was wondering if anyone could help me
    I'm wanting to do an economics degree and I am doing A level maths but maths is my least favourite of my A levels.
    If I chose an economics and finance degree instead of straight economics would the maths content be less?
    Also is the maths in an economics degree harder then A level maths or is it the same difficulty?thanks
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    (Original post by TheBrightSide)
    Hi was wondering if anyone could help me
    I'm wanting to do an economics degree and I am doing A level maths but maths is my least favourite of my A levels.
    If I chose an economics and finance degree instead of straight economics would the maths content be less?
    Also is the maths in an economics degree harder then A level maths or is it the same difficulty?thanks
    Depending on what university, Maths in undergraduate Economics is definitely harder than A-level Maths. That's why some unis prefer candidates who have done Further Maths. As for an Economics and finance degree, I'm not sure. Where ever you turn there'll be Maths unless you go for a BA degree.
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    (Original post by TheBrightSide)
    Hi was wondering if anyone could help me
    I'm wanting to do an economics degree and I am doing A level maths but maths is my least favourite of my A levels.
    If I chose an economics and finance degree instead of straight economics would the maths content be less?
    Also is the maths in an economics degree harder then A level maths or is it the same difficulty?thanks
    (Original post by zxh800)
    Depending on what university, Maths in undergraduate Economics is definitely harder than A-level Maths. That's why some unis prefer candidates who have done Further Maths. As for an Economics and finance degree, I'm not sure. Where ever you turn there'll be Maths unless you go for a BA degree.
    This is misleading and typical of responses of those who don't actually do economics or those you like to continue the idea that economics is some disguised maths degree. This is wrong. Further Maths is generally asked to distinguish the applicants further, regardless of where you go they will teach you all the maths you will need in your first year. The unis that ask for Further Maths don't typically have that much more maths content than those who don't specify it. In terms of it being harder, I would not say so at all. Most of the maths you do will be Calculus, a lot of the topics from A Level aren't very useful. You'll get to topics from FM just yet again it's selective.

    Your degree will be as mathematical as you want, aside from compulsory first year maths modules, you could choose all essay based modules. Second year Micro will essentially be Calculus driven and Macro involving lots of equations but very little actual mathematics.

    If you dislike Calculus then I strongly advise you not to choose economics, it's not anything someone who got an A at A Level maths can't handle though.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    This is misleading and typical of responses of those who don't actually do economics or those you like to continue the idea that economics is some disguised maths degree. This is wrong. Further Maths is generally asked to distinguish the applicants further, regardless of where you go they will teach you all the maths you will need in your first year. The unis that ask for Further Maths don't typically have that much more maths content than those who don't specify it. In terms of it being harder, I would not say so at all. Most of the maths you do will be Calculus, a lot of the topics from A Level aren't very useful. You'll get to topics from FM just yet again it's selective.

    Your degree will be as mathematical as you want, aside from compulsory first year maths modules, you could choose all essay based modules. Second year Micro will essentially be Calculus driven and Macro involving lots of equations but very little actual mathematics.

    If you dislike Calculus then I strongly advise you not to choose economics, it's not anything someone who got an A at A Level maths can't handle though.
    I stand corrected. Although, I fail to see what was the issue with anything I've stated. Do you deny that the Maths found in an undergraduate Economics course at the better universities is harder than A-level Maths? Or that having FM is desirable because a higher mathematical ability is desirable due to the content of the course? I mean, if Maths wasn't a key skill why would they designate an A* for Maths in an A*AA instead of leaving it open if only an A is required to handle the Maths.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    This is misleading and typical of responses of those who don't actually do economics or those you like to continue the idea that economics is some disguised maths degree. This is wrong. Further Maths is generally asked to distinguish the applicants further, regardless of where you go they will teach you all the maths you will need in your first year. The unis that ask for Further Maths don't typically have that much more maths content than those who don't specify it. In terms of it being harder, I would not say so at all. Most of the maths you do will be Calculus, a lot of the topics from A Level aren't very useful. You'll get to topics from FM just yet again it's selective.

    Your degree will be as mathematical as you want, aside from compulsory first year maths modules, you could choose all essay based modules. Second year Micro will essentially be Calculus driven and Macro involving lots of equations but very little actual mathematics.

    If you dislike Calculus then I strongly advise you not to choose economics, it's not anything someone who got an A at A Level maths can't handle though.
    Well, without wishing to sound like an elitist ****, it depends on where you go. What you have described is not representative of the LSE or Cambridge courses at all. I can at least vouch for that.

    I don't take issue with the fact that somebody who 'only' got an A in A-level Maths could not take on a top economics course. But the mathematics covered and used does far exceed a-level further maths, let alone the maths syllabus. Linear algebra, calculus/optimisation, differential equations, real analysis/measure theory all covered and used in 2nd and 3rd years in my case. Those who tend to switch courses (or drop out) at the end of the first year (typically around 5%) tend to be those that really struggled with the maths.

    It's true that you will be taught everything you need to go, but it can go at a very fast pace. What you might've spent 4 weeks learning in further maths is covered in a 55 mins lecture and you're expected to have mastered it.

    I'm not saying it's incredibly difficult -- it isn't -- but this: "regardless of where you go they will teach you all the maths you will need in your first year. The unis that ask for Further Maths don't typically have that much more maths content than those who don't specify it. In terms of it being harder, I would not say so at all."...is just not true for the top courses.
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    (Original post by zxh800)
    I stand corrected. Although, I fail to see what was the issue with anything I've stated. Do you deny that the Maths found in an undergraduate Economics course at the better universities is harder than A-level Maths? Or that having FM is desirable because a higher mathematical ability is desirable due to the content of the course? I mean, if Maths wasn't a key skill why would they designate an A* for Maths in an A*AA instead of leaving it open if only an A is required to handle the Maths.
    I wouldn't say it is harder but a different kind of maths. I'm not saying Maths isn't a key, it is, but from second year you're using maths in the context of the topic or module, some will find it easier than A levels but others won't. I think only UCL ask for A* in maths, I imagine because they want the best applicants. Look at it this way, entry offers have gone up quite a bit but the content of a UCL degree probably hasn't changed, they asked for AAA only a year ago.
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    (Original post by Overmars)
    Well, without wishing to sound like an elitist ****, it depends on where you go. What you have described is not representative of the LSE or Cambridge courses at all. I can at least vouch for that.

    I don't take issue with the fact that somebody who 'only' got an A in A-level Maths could not take on a top economics course. But the mathematics covered and used does far exceed a-level further maths, let alone the maths syllabus. Linear algebra, calculus/optimisation, differential equations, real analysis/measure theory all covered and used in 2nd and 3rd years in my case. Those who tend to switch courses (or drop out) at the end of the first year (typically around 5%) tend to be those that really struggled with the maths.

    It's true that you will be taught everything you need to go, but it can go at a very fast pace. What you might've spent 4 weeks learning in further maths is covered in a 55 mins lecture and you're expected to have mastered it.

    I'm not saying it's incredibly difficult -- it isn't -- but this: "regardless of where you go they will teach you all the maths you will need in your first year. The unis that ask for Further Maths don't typically have that much more maths content than those who don't specify it. In terms of it being harder, I would not say so at all."...is just not true for the top courses.
    I guess you're right, outside of maybe the top 5 the course may go heavily into mathematical theory. But I agree it nearly always goes further than the Maths A level course, but I wouldn't say personally that it was 'harder', but different. If topics such as measure theory, set theory and topology are compulsory at LSE and Cambridge then you're unlucky
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    Calling all Economics Freshers

    I have just finished my first year at Durham studying Economics and I have tonnes of books which are first year specific. They cost an arm and a leg at Waterstones, Durham's book monopolist, (I spent about £250 this year some of which were second hand), thus it is in your interest to try and buy them cheaply from current students.

    I have a comprehensive list of books for the main compulsory modules (Elements of Economics and The World Economy), as well as titles for the most popular electives (Business, Accounting and Finance and Environmental Economics). Please get in touch if you are interested and I will arrange payment methods and delivery.

    Books

    - Jacques, Mathematics for Economics and Business (4th Edition), 0273655647, RRP £38.94. £15.

    - Perloff, Microeconomics (3rd Edition), 0321160758, RRP £14. £10.

    - Pindyck and Rubinfeld, Micro Economics (6th Edition), 0131912070, RRP £40. £25.

    - Salvatore, International Economics (8th Edition), 0471230707, RRP £28.41. £20.

    - Snowdon, Globalisation, Transition and Development, 9781848448155, RRP £37.97. £30.

    - Mclaney and Atrill, Accounting: An Introduction (5th Edition), 9780273733201, RRP £50.87. £35.

    - Field and Field, Environmental Economics (5th Edition), 9780071276245, RRP £43.24. £20.

    - Perman et al, Natural Resource and Environmental Economics (3rd Edition), 0273655590, RRP £42.17. £25.


    Books are in module order, RRP is taken from Amazon, it would be even more expensive in Waterstones. I am willing to sell the entire set for £150 - considerably less than what it would cost to source individually. They helped me get 69 in first year and a summer internship at RBS GBM Markets Trading... maybe they can help you too.

    You can contact me on thestudentroom through private messages.

    Best of luck, I'm sure you all worked tirelessly for your A levels/IB!

    Ryan
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    (Original post by Overmars)
    Well, without wishing to sound like an elitist ****, it depends on where you go. What you have described is not representative of the LSE or Cambridge courses at all. I can at least vouch for that.

    I don't take issue with the fact that somebody who 'only' got an A in A-level Maths could not take on a top economics course. But the mathematics covered and used does far exceed a-level further maths, let alone the maths syllabus. Linear algebra, calculus/optimisation, differential equations, real analysis/measure theory all covered and used in 2nd and 3rd years in my case. Those who tend to switch courses (or drop out) at the end of the first year (typically around 5%) tend to be those that really struggled with the maths.

    It's true that you will be taught everything you need to go, but it can go at a very fast pace. What you might've spent 4 weeks learning in further maths is covered in a 55 mins lecture and you're expected to have mastered it.

    I'm not saying it's incredibly difficult -- it isn't -- but this: "regardless of where you go they will teach you all the maths you will need in your first year. The unis that ask for Further Maths don't typically have that much more maths content than those who don't specify it. In terms of it being harder, I would not say so at all."...is just not true for the top courses.

    Ok well basically I'm pretty sure I'll get an A in economics and A/B in maths. I'm not planning to go to cambridge or warwick but somewhere like Loughborough/York.
    They are not in the top 5 but i'm sure the courses will still contain a lot of maths (I don't mind maths I just would prefer to learn the economics written theory side of things if you get what I mean)
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    I'm thinking of applying to Durham and Bristol so far, good luck everybody
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    (Original post by Lena21)
    I'm thinking of applying to Durham and Bristol so far, good luck everybody
    Out of interest, why Durham? (I'm considering it too)
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    i study economics, maths, further maths and geography. i'm taking them all to a2

    i have 5 As, 3 A*s, and a B and a C at GCSE (this is like top 10 at the school i was at)

    i can't decide between economics and economics and maths combined.

    i am thinking of applying to Bristol, Bath, Warwick, Royal Holloway and, depending on results, LSE/UCL (ahh!)

    any advice? i am still totally unsure about everything and in a really vague place right now. it would be nice to stay close to london, where i live, but hten again, many of the universities here that i would like to go to are very hard to get into (especially with my crap gcse results and likelihood of me having a rubbish ps)!

    thanks
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    (Original post by tateco)
    Out of interest, why Durham? (I'm considering it too)
    Honestly, I can't explain it, I really like the course there and I heard that there is a possiblity to study abroad in Hong Kong for one year or semester but I'm not sure if it's true

    May I ask what are your other choices?
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    (Original post by Lena21)
    Honestly, I can't explain it, I really like the course there and I heard that there is a possiblity to study abroad in Hong Kong for one year or semester but I'm not sure if it's true

    May I ask what are your other choices?
    Sounds good I like Cambridge, UCL, Durham and Bath at the moment, it seems to be changing quite a lot, though. I did like Nottingham but not sure if I like it enough to risk A*AA...
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    (Original post by Jasminge)
    i study economics, maths, further maths and geography. i'm taking them all to a2

    i have 5 As, 3 A*s, and a B and a C at GCSE (this is like top 10 at the school i was at)

    i can't decide between economics and economics and maths combined.

    i am thinking of applying to Bristol, Bath, Warwick, Royal Holloway and, depending on results, LSE/UCL (ahh!)

    any advice? i am still totally unsure about everything and in a really vague place right now. it would be nice to stay close to london, where i live, but hten again, many of the universities here that i would like to go to are very hard to get into (especially with my crap gcse results and likelihood of me having a rubbish ps)!

    thanks
    Bristol, Warwick and UCL/LSE are three very high risk choices, and Bath isn't much better. RHUL you are probably likely to get an offer from (if you get good grades) so if you are happy to study there then apply to those universities (but don't expect more than one offer)
 
 
 
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