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    (Original post by thegenius31416)
    In terms of applicants to places, much less competitive (the ratio is almost 4 times better) but then again, applicants with languages tend to be usually quite strong. If I were to get an offer for that course, I'd be überglücklich!





    Haha ! Fair enough. For the PS are you going to include anything about German ?
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    (Original post by -Illmatic-)
    Haha ! Fair enough. For the PS are you going to include anything about German ?
    Yes since I have a fair few things to say about it and also I can link a lot of my economics related PS stuff to Germany too. All the courses I'm applying for potentially offer a year in Germany so it shouldn't be a problem talking about it in my PS.
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    (Original post by thegenius31416)
    applicants with languages tend to be usually quite strong.
    They probably should be strong in the language if they're applying for a course which offers them a year abroad in that country
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    (Original post by zxh800)
    I dunno, with FM and normal Maths there would definitely be M1 and M2 in there somewhere meaning a very nice overlap with Physics. Also, compared to both German and Economics, I'd say History is more of a hardcore essay subject. I found Economics quite lightweight and formulaic compared to History which wasa nightmare. As for German, surely they don't expect you to right write pages and pages in a language that isn't your mother tongue. So yea, :P I'd argue that Economics (AQA at least) aren't proper essay subjects.

    /end Historian's rant
    +Rep for the good reasoning

    I agree that AQA economics isn't that essay based (at AS anyway), but universities still see it as an essay subject. Doing History would also prepare you better for economics as it actually has a module or two which is directly related to the development of economies, whereas in Physics you won't learn anything to do with economics.
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    (Original post by tateco)
    They probably should be strong in the language if they're applying for a course which offers them a year abroad in that country
    You're on TSR early

    What I mean is that of the applicants I have seen with languages, they have usually had decent subject choices as well as grades.
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    On the note of Physics. I physically could not stand the subject at GCSE But I think a lot of people choose it because it's considered one of the hardest subjects to do at A level. Hats off to anyone who manages to get an A in that subject, my mind would probably explode in the process of me trying. Anyways, for me.. History > Physics anyday.
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    (Original post by thegenius31416)
    Yes since I have a fair few things to say about it and also I can link a lot of my economics related PS stuff to Germany too. All the courses I'm applying for potentially offer a year in Germany so it shouldn't be a problem talking about it in my PS.





    Yup same As in im applying for Economics major and German minor. I'm slightly stuck as to how to structure the german part...argh what the hell do i say
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    Just got back from the LSE open day, and I have to admit that I was impressed.

    They didn't even dodge the fact that they are notoriously fussy about applicants, but I think it's worth the effort.

    Some things of note for potential applicants who couldn't make it: (some of this is obvious, but just for the sake of mentioning it...):

    -Further maths is a MUST to at least AS level, and you will need an A if you don't take it to A2. They are a bit more flexible for the full A-Level and don't ask for an A* but they didn't specify a minimum requirement.

    -Their applicantffer ratio is ~18:1 so very competitive.

    -Very heavily maths based, more so then most other economic courses so you need to be a decent mathematician (well you would be I guess if you meet their offer...). Lecturer emphasised enjoyment, if you don't genuinely enjoy the subject, you will find that the course drags quite a bit.

    -Mixed response about GCSE results. In the economics talk the lecturer said that they don't instantly jump on applicants with A*/As and most of what gets said about how LSE emphasises them is a "myth". However in the "applying to LSE" talk later on it was mentioned that GCSEs are quite important to the application, and low grades will need to be explained somewhere.

    -I'll just throw this out there because it was seemed a bit emphasised in a talk..but work experience or relevant work placements help give you quite a decent boost. Again, seems obvious but when it comes to work experience etc, I've noted that some people on here seem a bit relaxed about it. You should at least try to find a placement I think.

    Erm, I think that's pretty much it without going into all the small points brought up in each talk, but these points stuck out at me so figured I would share
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    I've not read fully through this thread, but for top universities for Economics (Cambridge, LSE, etc.) what other subjects compliment it, I know Maths and FM are for definite, but out of their "lists" of subjects that aren't "soft," which ones are better?
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    (Original post by LiberiFatali)
    Just got back from the LSE open day, and I have to admit that I was impressed.

    They didn't even dodge the fact that they are notoriously fussy about applicants, but I think it's worth the effort.

    Some things of note for potential applicants who couldn't make it: (some of this is obvious, but just for the sake of mentioning it...):

    -Further maths is a MUST to at least AS level, and you will need an A if you don't take it to A2. They are a bit more flexible for the full A-Level and don't ask for an A* but they didn't specify a minimum requirement.

    -Their applicantffer ratio is ~18:1 so very competitive.

    -Very heavily maths based, more so then most other economic courses so you need to be a decent mathematician (well you would be I guess if you meet their offer...). Lecturer emphasised enjoyment, if you don't genuinely enjoy the subject, you will find that the course drags quite a bit.

    -Mixed response about GCSE results. In the economics talk the lecturer said that they don't instantly jump on applicants with A*/As and most of what gets said about how LSE emphasises them is a "myth". However in the "applying to LSE" talk later on it was mentioned that GCSEs are quite important to the application, and low grades will need to be explained somewhere.

    -I'll just throw this out there because it was seemed a bit emphasised in a talk..but work experience or relevant work placements help give you quite a decent boost. Again, seems obvious but when it comes to work experience etc, I've noted that some people on here seem a bit relaxed about it. You should at least try to find a placement I think.

    Erm, I think that's pretty much it without going into all the small points brought up in each talk, but these points stuck out at me so figured I would share
    Thanks for sharing, 18:1 is insanely high compared to other economics courses, I don't think I'm going to bother applying because I only have 5 A*s at GCSE and will only have FM AS, it's not really worth the risk, I also don't like how much compulsory maths is in comparison to other universities which are more flexible.

    (Original post by 24DJF)
    I've not read fully through this thread, but for top universities for Economics (Cambridge, LSE, etc.) what other subjects compliment it, I know Maths and FM are for definite, but out of their "lists" of subjects that aren't "soft," which ones are better?
    Maths, FM, Economics, Chemistry, Physics, History, English Lit, Languages, Geography, Biology.

    In my eyes, those are all really good subjects for economics courses. The first three are obviously the most important but you can still have a strong application (even if you're lacking one of FM or economics) if the rest of your subjects are made up of that list.
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    (Original post by 24DJF)
    I've not read fully through this thread, but for top universities for Economics (Cambridge, LSE, etc.) what other subjects compliment it, I know Maths and FM are for definite, but out of their "lists" of subjects that aren't "soft," which ones are better?
    Include Economics because that way it makes you look as if you are interested in the subject since you took it at A level. So then you'd have Economics, Further Maths, Maths. As long as you have those 3 subjects then you should be alright, I'd suggest to pick another 4th subject that is a traditional or core subject. Good luck
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    (Original post by LiberiFatali)
    -I'll just throw this out there because it was seemed a bit emphasised in a talk..but work experience or relevant work placements help give you quite a decent boost. Again, seems obvious but when it comes to work experience etc, I've noted that some people on here seem a bit relaxed about it. You should at least try to find a placement I think.
    Ah bummer, I hope this isn't my downfall. I'd be so gutted to not make it due to work experience. The only work experience I have is with an accountant in year 10. I guess I'll have to spin that a little bit and not mention that it was back ni year 10 :P.
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    (Original post by Hemzo)
    Include Economics because that way it makes you look as if you are interested in the subject since you took it at A level. So then you'd have Economics, Further Maths, Maths. As long as you have those 3 subjects then you should be alright, I'd suggest to pick another 4th subject that is a traditional or core subject. Good luck
    Thank you! Well I'm taking Maths, FM, Economics, German and Music at sixth form
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    (Original post by LiberiFatali)
    Just got back from the LSE open day, and I have to admit that I was impressed.

    They didn't even dodge the fact that they are notoriously fussy about applicants, but I think it's worth the effort.

    Some things of note for potential applicants who couldn't make it: (some of this is obvious, but just for the sake of mentioning it...):

    -Further maths is a MUST to at least AS level, and you will need an A if you don't take it to A2. They are a bit more flexible for the full A-Level and don't ask for an A* but they didn't specify a minimum requirement.

    -Their applicantffer ratio is ~18:1 so very competitive.

    -Very heavily maths based, more so then most other economic courses so you need to be a decent mathematician (well you would be I guess if you meet their offer...). Lecturer emphasised enjoyment, if you don't genuinely enjoy the subject, you will find that the course drags quite a bit.

    -Mixed response about GCSE results. In the economics talk the lecturer said that they don't instantly jump on applicants with A*/As and most of what gets said about how LSE emphasises them is a "myth". However in the "applying to LSE" talk later on it was mentioned that GCSEs are quite important to the application, and low grades will need to be explained somewhere.

    -I'll just throw this out there because it was seemed a bit emphasised in a talk..but work experience or relevant work placements help give you quite a decent boost. Again, seems obvious but when it comes to work experience etc, I've noted that some people on here seem a bit relaxed about it. You should at least try to find a placement I think.

    Erm, I think that's pretty much it without going into all the small points brought up in each talk, but these points stuck out at me so figured I would share
    Wooo I was there as well!! Plus I'm also going to the UCL one tmr
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    I hope UCL is as lovely as people say!
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    Decided not to take FM to A level but only to AS level. If it was as necessary as people make it out to be, it would be made more apparent by the unis. Only Cambridge of the ones I'm applying to even mention it and that's as a preferred which doesn't really mean much.
    I think some of you guys are way over playing the importance of it to an application. At the end of all of this, they all say it must be a 4th A level and they rarely if ever give an offer on it.

    Ofc I'm not saying it's detrimental, it does help but to me the advantage looks tiny and I'd rather have a subject where if I do have an offer based on it, I know I can meet it whatever it is.
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    Anyone find out anything interesting about UCL? What did they say in the economics talk? (I went to the open day and really like the uni, but couldn't get into the talk)
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    (Original post by tateco)
    Anyone find out anything interesting about UCL? What did they say in the economics talk? (I went to the open day and really like the uni, but couldn't get into the talk)
    He didn't want to comment on the percentage of successful applicants doing Further Maths, but he said the more maths the better. He also said the majority of candidates have A*AA.

    I'm not too sure how I feel about it. Academically it looks great and I liked the talk. However, I didn't feel the buildings were that spectacular nor did I feel there was a massive focus. At least with LSE you know that they are focused on academics and high-prestige lecturers, etc.

    The quality of accommodation was poor. Although I guess the ones further away may be nicer!

    What in particular did you like?
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    (Original post by Groat)
    He didn't want to comment on the percentage of successful applicants doing Further Maths, but he said the more maths the better. He also said the majority of candidates have A*AA.

    I'm not too sure how I feel about it. Academically it looks great and I liked the talk. However, I didn't feel the buildings were that spectacular nor did I feel there was a massive focus. At least with LSE you know that they are focused on academics and high-prestige lecturers, etc.

    The quality of accommodation was poor. Although I guess the ones further away may be nicer!

    What in particular did you like?
    Is this the first open day you have been on?

    Compared to Nottingham the buildings were amazing, the actual economics building was really nice and I love where it is positioned (so close to St Pancras). The people also seemed really friendly as well. What do you mean by high-prestige lecturers and focused on academics?

    That accommodation was much nicer than Nottingham (I personally think that I was expecting too much from university accommodation).
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    (Original post by tateco)
    Is this the first open day you have been on?

    Compared to Nottingham the buildings were amazing, the actual economics building was really nice and I love where it is positioned (so close to St Pancras). The people also seemed really friendly as well. What do you mean by high-prestige lecturers and focused on academics?

    That accommodation was much nicer than Nottingham (I personally think that I was expecting too much from university accommodation).
    I've seen LSE, Warwick and UCL.

    Well LSE from the start made it clear their position in the financial centre of the world was a strong point. I just didn't get much from UCL: maybe that's because there were so many students, but sports and else were thin. I know you could argue the same about LSE, but at least you know LSE's position.

    It's the price of the accommodation as well; I bet Nottingham was much cheaper! Did you look at the two in the open day book? The halls just felt like a shabby hotel.

    On the Economics side I was impressed. I liked that the maths elements weren't too statistical unless taken as an option, and the fact you can take modules in other faculties is great. As you know I am quite interested in Maths and Computer Science, so UCL could offer that (LSE are similar in offering Law modules).

    I just don't know whether a London university is for me. The academia is excellent, but prices and feel . . . Although one could argue London city offers the vibrant nature rather than the university. I don't think my maintenance loan would cover accommodation alone which is scary - I'm all up for taking loans, but when they don't even cover the costs it's worrying.
 
 
 
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