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    (Original post by Aluu93)
    This is so true! But I think having seen my maths grade and knowing that my maths is not insanely strong, that I would prefer a slightly less mathematical course which Oxford provides no?
    The economic course itself is not much less mathsy than the Cambridge one. The reason why people perceive the Oxford course as less mathsy is because of the portion of management you have to take. In the first year for instance you only get an introduction to economics, the rest is management. And of course Management is not really quantitative; the economics course is. So if you like Management the Oxford course will be a good choice but if you prefer to just study economics then take the Cambridge one. And as long as you get an A* in Maths by resitting some modules you will still have a reasonable chance getting into Cambride. You just have to be good at the interview . So my advice is: choose the course you prefer. They will be both mathematically challenging
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    (Original post by zxh800)
    At least you have something written .
    I only found out what I needed to do one a two weeks ago...

    You'd better hurry up and at the very least get a draft done.
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    You haven't started yet?
    I've started. But, I haven't gotten very far. I'm struggling with material.
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    (Original post by perrytheplatypus)
    My personal statement reads like a man banging his head on a wall -_-
    :console:

    I know how you feel. Take a break for a day or two and hopefully the ideas will sort of fit into place.
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    (Original post by Genius7)
    I am in year 11 and have just finished my GCSEs and I am wondering which books would be best to read over summer to help greatest develop my knowledge outside the A level syllabus. (soz for going off thread topic but I thought this was the best place to ask)
    I'm applying to Oxford, UCL, Durham Warwick and Leeds in October and here is my reading list for this summer, devised by myself, all my teacher would reccomend is Freakonomics which is what every second rate Econ applicanat has read and puts on their PS.

    New Ideas From Dead Economists Buchholz T
    The Ascent of Money Ferguson N
    The Wealth of Nations Smith A
    A General Theory of Interest Employment and Money Keynes J
    More Money Than God Mallabey S
    World on Fire Chua A
    Too Big to Fail Ross Sorkin A
    The Bottom Billion Collier P
    The Black Swan Taleb N
    Fooled by Randomness Taleb N
    The Economics of Exchenge Rates Sarno L, Taylor M
    The Truth About Markets Kay J

    Plus the Economist and the Financial Times.

    Hope this is helpful.
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    (Original post by Quark123)
    I'm applying to Oxford, UCL, Durham Warwick and Leeds in October and here is my reading list for this summer, devised by myself, all my teacher would reccomend is Freakonomics which is what every second rate Econ applicanat has read and puts on their PS.

    New Ideas From Dead Economists Buchholz T
    The Ascent of Money Ferguson N
    The Wealth of Nations Smith A
    A General Theory of Interest Employment and Money Keynes J
    More Money Than God Mallabey S
    World on Fire Chua A
    Too Big to Fail Ross Sorkin A
    The Bottom Billion Collier P
    The Black Swan Taleb N
    Fooled by Randomness Taleb N
    The Economics of Exchenge Rates Sarno L, Taylor M
    The Truth About Markets Kay J

    Plus the Economist and the Financial Times.

    Hope this is helpful.
    Wow this is a lot!!! Have fun with 'Wealth of Nations'. The economics tutor at Merton College told me even he had trouble understanding it . But always remember: You are better off just reading 4 or 5 and really know what they are about than reading >10 and just know little about them. But they are all good books!
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    (Original post by Groat)
    :console:

    I know how you feel. Take a break for a day or two and hopefully the ideas will sort of fit into place.
    THIS. I left mine for a fortnight after a couple of drafts and it helped sooo much, I have come back to it with a completely open mind and changed it a lot for the better!

    (Original post by zxh800)
    I've started. But, I haven't gotten very far. I'm struggling with material.
    Have you read many books? All it takes is one book that interested you or one news article which you decided to research further and you have your basis
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    (Original post by Quark123)
    I'm applying to Oxford, UCL, Durham Warwick and Leeds in October and here is my reading list for this summer, devised by myself, all my teacher would reccomend is Freakonomics which is what every second rate Econ applicanat has read and puts on their PS.

    New Ideas From Dead Economists Buchholz T
    The Ascent of Money Ferguson N
    The Wealth of Nations Smith A
    A General Theory of Interest Employment and Money Keynes J
    More Money Than God Mallabey S
    World on Fire Chua A
    Too Big to Fail Ross Sorkin A
    The Bottom Billion Collier P
    The Black Swan Taleb N
    Fooled by Randomness Taleb N
    The Economics of Exchenge Rates Sarno L, Taylor M
    The Truth About Markets Kay J

    Plus the Economist and the Financial Times.

    Hope this is helpful.
    What's the point of reading so many books (for your PS I assume)? Especially ones like The Wealth of Nations.

    Also, why would you describe Freakonomics as second rate?
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    (Original post by Quark123)
    I'm applying to Oxford, UCL, Durham Warwick and Leeds in October and here is my reading list for this summer, devised by myself, all my teacher would reccomend is Freakonomics which is what every second rate Econ applicanat has read and puts on their PS.

    New Ideas From Dead Economists Buchholz T
    The Ascent of Money Ferguson N
    The Wealth of Nations Smith A
    A General Theory of Interest Employment and Money Keynes J
    More Money Than God Mallabey S
    World on Fire Chua A
    Too Big to Fail Ross Sorkin A
    The Bottom Billion Collier P
    The Black Swan Taleb N
    Fooled by Randomness Taleb N
    The Economics of Exchenge Rates Sarno L, Taylor M
    The Truth About Markets Kay J

    Plus the Economist and the Financial Times.

    Hope this is helpful.
    That's an interesting reading list, but nothing on microeconomics I see! A General Theory is not a good read, in my opinion - if you're interested in Keynesian economics, there are much better books.

    How's the reading going?
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    Have you read many books? All it takes is one book that interested you or one news article which you decided to research further and you have your basis
    I've reserved a couple at the library, I don't have enough money to buy them so in that respect my hands are tied till they arrive. I was reading "The road to serfdom" by Friedrich Hayek but I'm hesitant to mention stuff from it in my PS as I don't think I'll be able to know the book well enough if queried at an Interview. The book wasn't very interesting and I was struggling to pay attention when reading. The other books are more current, so hopefully they'll be better.
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    (Original post by Quark123)
    I'm applying to Oxford, UCL, Durham Warwick and Leeds in October and here is my reading list for this summer, devised by myself, all my teacher would reccomend is Freakonomics which is what every second rate Econ applicanat has read and puts on their PS.

    New Ideas From Dead Economists Buchholz T
    The Ascent of Money Ferguson N
    The Wealth of Nations Smith A
    A General Theory of Interest Employment and Money Keynes J
    More Money Than God Mallabey S
    World on Fire Chua A
    Too Big to Fail Ross Sorkin A
    The Bottom Billion Collier P
    The Black Swan Taleb N
    Fooled by Randomness Taleb N
    The Economics of Exchenge Rates Sarno L, Taylor M
    The Truth About Markets Kay J

    Plus the Economist and the Financial Times.

    Hope this is helpful.
    The only one I've read in full on there is The Black Swan - I found it difficult to the arrogant and repetitive style of writing, and logical inconsistency of some of the key arguments (unfortunately I can't remember which ones). That and that most of the time I felt it was just common sense wrapped in unnecessarily artistic prose. On the other hand, I did agree with much of what he wrote, inasmuch as others had clearly not adhered to said common sense.
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    (Original post by zxh800)
    I've reserved a couple at the library, I don't have enough money to buy them so in that respect my hands are tied till they arrive. I was reading "The road to serfdom" by Friedrich Hayek but I'm hesitant to mention stuff from it in my PS as I don't think I'll be able to know the book well enough if queried at an Interview. The book wasn't very interesting and I was struggling to pay attention when reading. The other books are more current, so hopefully they'll be better.
    I know how you feel with boredom, some books just don't grab your interest at all, that's what I found with 'The Bottom Billion' anyway...
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    I know how you feel with boredom, some books just don't grab your interest at all, that's what I found with 'The Bottom Billion' anyway...
    Oh I was actually planning to read 'The Bottom Billion'. So you think it's not really worth reading?
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    (Original post by nightmare91)
    Oh I was actually planning to read 'The Bottom Billion'. So you think it's not really worth reading?
    Well I just didn't like the style (I didn't get past the first 50 pages) but that's not to say you won't like it, you may as well give it a go
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    (Original post by Tateco)
    Well I just didn't like the style (I didn't get past the first 50 pages) but that's not to say you won't like it, you may as well give it a go
    I had a similar issue with Stiglitz's "Globalisation and Its Discontents" - I still have it on my bedside table at home with the bookmark where it was over 3 years ago.
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    I had a similar issue with Stiglitz's "Globalisation and Its Discontents" - I still have it on my bedside table at home with the bookmark where it was over 3 years ago.
    Some economists just aren't good novelists.
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    (Original post by alex_hk90)
    I had a similar issue with Stiglitz's "Globalisation and Its Discontents" - I still have it on my bedside table at home with the bookmark where it was over 3 years ago.
    Glad I'm not the only one
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    Just some advice based on my last application. My old PS was basically a list of books I had read and my comments on them. A book review basically. I would say, to mention one to two books briefly and then what you thought about them is enough and to go beyond that is excessive in my opinion.
    BTW my grades weren't bad last year and I think 3 of the 5 rejections explicitly mentioned my PS as being a reason for weakness.
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    (Original post by economyst)
    Just some advice based on my last application. My old PS was basically a list of books I had read and my comments on them. A book review basically. I would say, to mention one to two books briefly and then what you thought about them is enough and to go beyond that is excessive in my opinion.
    BTW my grades weren't bad last year and I think 3 of the 5 rejections explicitly mentioned my PS as being a reason for weakness.
    Thanks for the tip I started by mentioning three but now only mention 2 so hopefully I'm heading in the right direction! Good luck for this year btw, have you decided on your choices?
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    (Original post by Quark123)
    I'm applying to Oxford, UCL, Durham Warwick and Leeds in October and here is my reading list for this summer, devised by myself, all my teacher would reccomend is Freakonomics which is what every second rate Econ applicanat has read and puts on their PS.

    New Ideas From Dead Economists Buchholz T
    The Ascent of Money Ferguson N
    The Wealth of Nations Smith A
    A General Theory of Interest Employment and Money Keynes J
    More Money Than God Mallabey S
    World on Fire Chua A
    Too Big to Fail Ross Sorkin A
    The Bottom Billion Collier P
    The Black Swan Taleb N
    Fooled by Randomness Taleb N
    The Economics of Exchenge Rates Sarno L, Taylor M
    The Truth About Markets Kay J

    Plus the Economist and the Financial Times.

    Hope this is helpful.
    Just thought I'd say that Smith and Keynes are not good reads. They're not done for reading at this stage and it won't benefit you much. Also whilst they have the "original" ideas and are famous, it's a bit like reading Newton. Any current economics book will have all their knowledge contained in it in a more, concise and easily understood way.

    (Original post by Tateco)
    What's the point of reading so many books (for your PS I assume)? Especially ones like The Wealth of Nations.

    Also, why would you describe Freakonomics as second rate?
    I think it's a good read, however it's done for the general public as in it has very little economics substance in it so while it's interesting, it doesn't help your understanding.
 
 
 
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