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    These are the 3 books which we have studied in the past months. I need to come up with a world lit topic, but I have no ideas. I am meant to pick two of the plays and then do a comparison of the two. I would be very grateful if anyone had any ideas.
    Plays
    Antigone by Sophocles
    Death and the Maiden by Chilean playwright Ariel Dorfman
    The Visit by Swiss dramatist Friedrich Dürrenmat
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    Off the top of my head (and from what I remember), one of the topics I considered doing was, "To what extent does understatement in dialogue foreshadow dramatic irony, plot, and character development?"

    In Death and the Maiden almost all of Paulina's (I think that was the female protagonist's name) dialogue had a strong inkling of something burning under the surface, especially in the first scene when Roberto (her husband?) comes home late and she accuses him of a multitude of things in a very subtle way. Similarly in The Visit, Madame Zachanassian's dialogue is essentially very simple when she first comes to Güllen, its only until the end of the first Act does she make her intentions clear when she corrects the Mayor on his speech and what she really wants from the Gülleners (i.e. to kill Alfred Ill).

    Another idea would be the importance of set and stage directions and the dramatic effect they have (you can rewrite the question better).

    I remember in Death and the Maiden, there was an extremely dramatic scene in the end of the play when a giant mirror descended and the audience was made to look at itself. There was also the entire scene's worth of stage directions when she captured Dr. Miranda (I think?) and tied him up and all those crazy stage directions when she was making breakfast with the Doctor tied up on a chair nearby in the scene after. In The Visit, stage directions help to signify the impoverishment of the land and people. the constant reuse of Man 1,2,3,4 as trees/birds/whatever in various scenes. How they pretend that all the furniture and sets are there, when in reality its just plan air and how that further emphasises the whole "minimalist" idea of Güllen. You can also comment on the transformation on the town from the first scene to the last after Alfred's death.

    I'll come back and edit this if I come up with something else.
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    Sorry this is late, but that helped a lot and I have now almost finished my world lit .
 
 
 
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