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will 3 minor faults in a category result in a failure? watch

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    I searched widely in google and found very different results. I am really confused now.

    Some posts said if you committed more than 3 minor faults in a particular category, then this accrues to to a serious habitual one. This means you are only allowed to make up to 3 minor ones in a category. Any number >=4 will result in a failure.

    Some posts said 3 minor faults in a category have already resulted in a failure. So here the number is >=3.

    I checked the official DSA website, and could not find any information about the number of minor faults in a category. It only says, to get a pass, you can only make up to 15 minor ones without making a serious or dangerous fault. I got a BSM book (2008) which also only mentions about the 15 minor faults without saying anything about the 3 minor ones in a category.

    Can any help to clarify? Really appreciate it...
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    nope. 15 and over... then you fail
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    It's 4 =D

    I got 3 for "unnecessary deliberation" (or whatever it is when you don't pull out straight away because you are too scared of the examiner thinking you rush too much, whereas if they weren't in the car you really would have gone!)
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    I passed with 13 minor faults, and definitely had more than 3 for braking too suddenly.
    I think that in some cases though, committing the same fault consistently might be considered as a major fault if it's dangerous.
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    I heard it was 4, but I'm sure that it's really just 15+ overall.
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    (Original post by bncoxuk)
    I searched widely in google and found very different results. I am really confused now.

    Some posts said if you committed more than 3 minor faults in a particular category, then this accrues to to a serious habitual one. This means you are only allowed to make up to 3 minor ones in a category. Any number >=4 will result in a failure.

    Some posts said 3 minor faults in a category have already resulted in a failure. So here the number is >=3.

    I checked the official DSA website, and could not find any information about the number of minor faults in a category. It only says, to get a pass, you can only make up to 15 minor ones without making a serious or dangerous fault. I got a BSM book (2008) which also only mentions about the 15 minor faults without saying anything about the 3 minor ones in a category.

    Can any help to clarify? Really appreciate it...
    If you get 4 or more minors in a certain category you get a major for it (so you fail). It was like that on one of my driving tests, i got 4 minors in a category (i cant remember which one it was) and so got a major for it.
    You are right about having up to 15 minors in total though.
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    Yep its 4 minors in the same area, my friend failed the other day because she kept indicating too early at junctions so people behind her may have thought she would turn earlier than she was going too.

    Is your test coming up then? Good luck, I passed mine on tuesday.
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    Unfortunately there is no hard and fast rule. It might be 3, it might be 4, it might even be 5 (I had one with 7 before the examiner stopped counting - this is another story ) The issue is that it is considered to be a habitual fault.

    The problem is that some categories on the form are quite wide and cover a number of scenarios, even though the minor fault is classed as the same. I suspect they also take into account the number of times you could have committed the fault. For example, 4 minor faults on mirrors will be less than 4% of the total mirror checks; however, 4 positioning errors on junctions will be 15% or more. This is because you do many more mirror checks than junctions. The former may well not be a habitual fault, the latter will be.

    Sorry that there isn't a clearer more precise answer but I guess driving isn't always that clear and precise.
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    My friend failed his first test for being marked down for driving too slowly three times. I guess his examiner just didn't feel confident in his driving but could only find that area to fault him on (although even two years on he can't drive properly...).
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    four or more is a fail for the car test, bike test its three.
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    I had 5 in one category and still passed. I guess it depends on how serious the mistake is.
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    Folks, any more ideas to be shared? Shall we just discard or respect something like 3 minors in a category?
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    (Original post by greeneyedgirl)
    It's 4 =D

    I got 3 for "unnecessary deliberation" (or whatever it is when you don't pull out straight away because you are too scared of the examiner thinking you rush too much, whereas if they weren't in the car you really would have gone!)
    its called undue hesitation, i failed my 1st test for that reason. It was because i was stopped at a junction giving way to a 50mph+ moving van and thought it'd be suicidal for me to even attempt going yet examiner disagreed and failed me even though i save both are lives. I passed on 2nd test 2 weeks later with 7 minors and a new examiner, insurance a ***** for my age group though (19 yrs
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    (Original post by bncoxuk)
    Folks, any more ideas to be shared? Shall we just discard or respect something like 3 minors in a category?
    its either 3~4, i passed 2nd time with 7 minors in total
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    (Original post by berryboysh)
    its called undue hesitation, i failed my 1st test for that reason. It was because i was stopped at a junction giving way to a 50mph+ moving van and thought it'd be suicidal for me to even attempt going yet examiner disagreed and failed me even though i save both are lives. I passed on 2nd test 2 weeks later with 7 minors and a new examiner, insurance a ***** for my age group though (19 yrs
    Ah yeah, that's what it's called!

    I think it's the harshest thing, because in your test of course you're going to be extra cautious because it's your test!!
    Luckily I still passed, but she said she was giving me the benefit of the doubt in not giving me a fourth one and therefore turning it into a major.
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    (Original post by greeneyedgirl)
    Ah yeah, that's what it's called!

    I think it's the harshest thing, because in your test of course you're going to be extra cautious because it's your test!!
    Luckily I still passed, but she said she was giving me the benefit of the doubt in not giving me a fourth one and therefore turning it into a major.
    your examiner seemed decent enough to see past a few mistakes, my first who i passed with was a chinese guy who has a reputation for being very strict and controling and doesn't let any little mistake get past him so many people dread getting him. My second examiner who i passed with was great, he used to be the test centre manager and had a bit of a fierce reputation with other people but he seemed to like me and put me at ease and he also ignored a few mistakes giving me the benefit of doubt, it was a bright sunny day that day to and so i missed a few speed signs due to the glare of the sun and so he told me what the limit was on the ones i missed which was good as he didn't have to do that
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    (Original post by greeneyedgirl)
    Ah yeah, that's what it's called!

    I think it's the harshest thing, because in your test of course you're going to be extra cautious because it's your test!!
    Luckily I still passed, but she said she was giving me the benefit of the doubt in not giving me a fourth one and therefore turning it into a major.
    your examiner seemed decent enough to see past a few mistakes, my first examiner who i failed with was a chinese guy who has a reputation for being very strict and controling and doesn't let any little mistake get past him so many people dread getting him. My second examiner who i passed with was great, he used to be the test centre manager and had a bit of a fierce reputation with other people but he seemed to like me and put me at ease and he also ignored a few mistakes giving me the benefit of doubt, it was a bright sunny day that day to and so i missed a few speed signs due to the glare of the sun and so he told me what the limit was on the ones i missed which was good as he didn't have to do that
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    (Original post by bncoxuk)
    Folks, any more ideas to be shared? Shall we just discard or respect something like 3 minors in a category?
    Just listen to the driving instructor; it is probably the best answer so I don't know why you're asking for more speculation from people who are less knowledgable on the subject...


    (Original post by Emma-Ashley)
    Unfortunately there is no hard and fast rule. It might be 3, it might be 4, it might even be 5 (I had one with 7 before the examiner stopped counting - this is another story ) The issue is that it is considered to be a habitual fault.

    The problem is that some categories on the form are quite wide and cover a number of scenarios, even though the minor fault is classed as the same. I suspect they also take into account the number of times you could have committed the fault. For example, 4 minor faults on mirrors will be less than 4% of the total mirror checks; however, 4 positioning errors on junctions will be 15% or more. This is because you do many more mirror checks than junctions. The former may well not be a habitual fault, the latter will be.

    Sorry that there isn't a clearer more precise answer but I guess driving isn't always that clear and precise.
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    (Original post by ily_em)
    Just listen to the driving instructor; it is probably the best answer so I don't know why you're asking for more speculation from people who are less knowledgable on the subject...

    I used two driving instructors before, but they were not very clear about this rule.

    I do appreciate the help of the members here. So nothing about speculation. I failed 5 times now, really nervous.
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    (Original post by bncoxuk)
    I searched widely in google and found very different results. I am really confused now.

    Some posts said if you committed more than 3 minor faults in a particular category, then this accrues to to a serious habitual one. This means you are only allowed to make up to 3 minor ones in a category. Any number >=4 will result in a failure.

    Some posts said 3 minor faults in a category have already resulted in a failure. So here the number is >=3.

    I checked the official DSA website, and could not find any information about the number of minor faults in a category. It only says, to get a pass, you can only make up to 15 minor ones without making a serious or dangerous fault. I got a BSM book (2008) which also only mentions about the 15 minor faults without saying anything about the 3 minor ones in a category.

    Can any help to clarify? Really appreciate it...
    It's definitely MORE than 3 in a category. I got 3 minors for hesitation and I just passed.
 
 
 
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