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    (Original post by tommorris)
    As for Equine Sports Science (according to UCAS, available at UWE, Lincoln, Wolverhampton and, at Nottingham Trent, available with Equine Psychology as an option), Golf Studies with Management (Guildford College) and Homeopathy (Central Lancashire, Westminster), they're totally non-academic (I mean, Homeopathy doesn't do anything beyond the bleeding placebo effect - how can you have a three year course on nothing? Might as well have a BSc in Astrology!). Their only purpose is to try to meet Blair's 50% target. And that's not a good reason.
    EQUINE PSYCHOLOGY!! LMAO! :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

    And don't forget there's a degree in Madonna Studies somewhere...
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    (Original post by Iscariot)
    You've got to remember, about only 70% of university graduates end up getting a job straight out of university, so that 60% figure may be misleading.

    That 70% could only be because the other 30% end up going into further study, take a break/travel etc - not necessarily because they could not get a job
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    Who'd consider Digital Animation as a micky mouse degree?
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    (Original post by DanGrover)
    Who'd consider Digital Animation as a micky mouse degree?
    hmm, my friend started it this year and he loves it. I saw some of his work that hes been doing at uni and its pretty impressive. Looks interesting aswell but in terms of jobs, i dotn think you could get far with that degree as far as the digital animation market goes. But then again, i dont know much about the subject. Theres a good thread on this site actually http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/t80586.html

    That should help you, its got plenty of links
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    (Original post by DanGrover)
    Who'd consider Digital Animation as a micky mouse degree?
    Me. But not because it isn't difficult or hard to learn - it's certainly something I'd find very, very challenging. It's just not what I consider a university subject. In studying it, you are learning, by drill, a whole bunch of skills.

    To call it a university subject is to perform a feat of unforgiveable sophistry.
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    Perhaps, but these skills, however learnt, are necessary for a job in any kind of animation industry (advertismenets, computer games, films, environment modelling). How else would you learn these skills? University is already set up perfectly for this kind of education.
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    In Germany, non-academic stuff like Digital Animation is being taught as a "Ausbildung"; You either go to a "UoAS" or some private form of college or apply directly to a firm that trains people in that given subject, while paying them a, albeit smaller than usual, wage and in most cases guarantee employment after you get your certificate.

    That's a nice solution for employers: They immediately see whether the prospective employee is uni educated or got his (inferior - that's the way it is seen there) education in a Ausbildung.
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    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/tees/3910847.stm

    In my opinion this is an example of where the 50% target is showing its ugly head.
    It seems to me that the police have simply contracted out their training to a university, presumably with the same instructors teaching the same course.

    Another example is the infamous degree in beds

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/7343027.stm

    If the government actually got 50% through higher education, and thus was able to get more advanced industries into the UK then thats fine, but rebranding internal company/organisation training courses as degrees can't help matters in any way.

    I would be very interested to see if any employers considered a candidate with 3 years managerial experience but no degree any less than a candidate with the same experience but a foundation degree because their employer contracted out its training?
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    (Original post by Iscariot)
    I don't know, they just irk me somehow. People who study sociology and other 'soft' sciences just fit this general stereotype of the girl who isn't really that smart but is trying desperately hard to impress people or the artistic young male who wears all black but can think of nothing more fun than arguing over the wording of one of philosophy's fine scholars essays. I know quite a few people who've graduated from courses such as philosophy, history, sociology, human relations, international conflict and psychology who have said that they've found it difficult to find jobs because the subjects aren't really associated with any practical uses within society.

    While I think psychology definately is a work in progress, especially with regards to biochemistry and neuroscience, a lot of people view psychology as just studying Milgram's experiment and discussing how interesting the results are - humans are influnenced by what people tell them to do - then what? Where next?

    Maybe I'm just old fashioned and need to get with the times, but I just think social sciences, of which I'm going to include psychology, are basically useless in finding a job. While some people say they aren't going to university to further their job prospects, I think that really is the point in university, to find a better job, and I don't believe social sciences really contribute to that goal.
    What the **** are you on about? How is my degree useless? Quite a lot of economic students end up getting very good jobs because of the skills they learn!
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    (Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
    What the **** are you on about? How is my degree useless? Quite a lot of economic students end up getting very good jobs because of the skills they learn!
    He didn't mention economics as far as I see it.


    But I think your "daredevil-level" makes you the money and furthers your job prospects, not the knowledge you actually aquire. If you're so unimaginative, not to say stupid, to see the links between what you learned in psychology, sociology or international relations and the world you live in, then you are the type of guy who must study engineering or accounting or other stuff.

    Which of those two one is doesn't matter, as long as you are content with what you do.


    Sociologists...well, I can only think of think tanks, policymaking and politics (does that count as a job?) for those people.

    But psychologists, combinded with something busines-related or vice versa, have, IMO, a perfect starting position for very competetive jobs like management consultancy (McKinsey and stuff) or direct entrance into staff management. PLus, they have such a wide education that they may start at NGOs, GOs, newspapers (that, I think, is like closing your eyes and attempting to cross an 8-line motorway unharmed...tricky)


    To sum it up: Engineers, accountants will never have to fear joblessness, as they will always be needed someplace for something. The other "non-vocational" lot are, I'd put it that way, a lot more dependent on what other people think of them, meaning they can't really leverage they theoretical knowledge in a job interview. But as it happens, those people's scope of "transient/intangible" knowledge enables them to do things completely different from what they studied.

    And @iscariot: What do you think about physicists in that context?

    WHO DISAGREES WITH ME!? For the sake of discussion, pleaso do
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    He mocked social sciences which economics is part of.
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    (Original post by Iscariot)
    Maybe I'm just old fashioned and need to get with the times, but I just think social sciences, of which I'm going to include psychology, are basically useless in finding a job. While some people say they aren't going to university to further their job prospects, I think that really is the point in university, to find a better job, and I don't believe social sciences really contribute to that goal.
    1. I'm due to start criminology at Durham, and am aiming for Government/civil service work or something specific in a special forces police group. So not useless.

    2. University is not a passport to work with only job propsects to think of.

    3. If you're really old fashioned why are you studying at the University of East London?
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    (Original post by NDGAARONDI)
    1. I'm due to start criminology at Durham, and am aiming for Government/civil service work or something specific in a special forces police group. So not useless.
    The thing is, you can get a lot of those sorts of jobs without the degree. That's one of the reasons I dropped out of a criminology course. Ok, you'd start a little further down the rung, but that's arguably made up in the three years it takes to get the degree anyway.

    Of course the other reason I dropped out is that I just didn't honestly want to do it in the end, heh ^^
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    (Original post by suek)
    The thing is, you can get a lot of those sorts of jobs without the degree. That's one of the reasons I dropped out of a criminology course. Ok, you'd start a little further down the rung, but that's arguably made up in the three years it takes to get the degree anyway.

    Of course the other reason I dropped out is that I just didn't honestly want to do it in the end, heh ^^
    You can but part of the reason I've taken the course up is to see how well I do and, should I achieve a first, I will have no hesitation in applying for a masters. Plus initially I was looking at the Fast Track Service.
 
 
 
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