Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

3 minor faults in a category: a golden rule or just a trick Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Re: the question of 3 minor faults posted by bncoxuk

    I found two real cases in which the learner failed the test because of 3 minor errors in the same category.

    Can we conclude that there is really no such a golden rule as 3 minors in the same category to make a fail?
    Offline

    17
    No we can't. If you repeatedly make the same mistake there's clearly a problem, and while it might not be serious in your 30 minute test it could well be if you were allowed to drive around unsupervised. That's why repeated minors turn into a major. The number of minors that requires would be down to the type of error and the seriousness of it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I made 3 minor faults in the same category and passed so I'd say it's not true (: But then as the previous poster said they were not very serious/dangerous ones which is why they didn't turn into a major
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dothebest8)
    Re: the question of 3 minor faults posted by bncoxuk

    I found two real cases in which the learner failed the test because of 3 minor errors in the same category.

    Can we conclude that there is really no such a golden rule as 3 minors in the same category to make a fail?

    Thanks, dothebest8. I also want to get this clear and hopefully everyone can find that post useful. We cannot afford to taking so many tests. Really annoying.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    It isn't a golden rule, but if you habitually make the same mistake it may be regarded as dangerous.

    (Original post by DSA DT1 (Internal Guidance for Examiners))
    DEFINITION OF FAULTS
    Faults are defined as follws:
    A driving fault is one, which in itself is not potentially dangerous. However, a
    candidate who habitually commits a driving fault in one aspect of driving throughout
    the test, demonstrating an inability to deal with certain situations, cannot be regarded
    as competent to pass the test, as that fault alone must be seen as potentially
    dangerous.
    A serious fault is one, which is potentially dangerous.
    A dangerous fault is one involving actual danger to the examiner, candidate, the
    general public or property. (Note: If the fault has been assessed as dangerous then
    this should be marked regardless of any action taken by the examiner.
    Faults should be marked with an oblique stroke in the appropriate box
    from here
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chriscpritchard)
    It isn't a golden rule, but if you habitually make the same mistake it may be regarded as dangerous.



    from here

    Excellent information!!! Thanks, mate.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: March 18, 2011
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up sugar, or salt?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.