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    Hi all.

    I'm looking for the reason I got this question wrong in an exam. As far as I can see, what I have wrote is correct.

    Perhaps the question (i) should read 'In which group will element 'X' be found?

    They are all in different groups as I see it?

    Out of 128 people who sat this exam, only 1 passed! There are other questions that are worded badly.

    Thoughts appreciated :confused:

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    (Original post by john_ukd)
    Hi all.

    I'm looking for the reason I got this question wrong in an exam. As far as I can see, what I have wrote is correct.

    Perhaps the question (i) should read 'In which group will element 'X' be found?

    They are all in different groups as I see it?

    Out of 128 people who sat this exam, only 1 passed! There are other questions that are worded badly.

    Thoughts appreciated :confused:

    what you wrote is correct.

    If you check out a table of ionisation energies you will find that

    A is Nitrogen,
    B is Magnesium
    C is Oxygen.

    They have marked it incorrectly.

    You were robbed! :shock:
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    nitrogen is in group 15
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    (Original post by Maker)
    nitrogen is in group 15
    oh no it ain't! Five outer electrons = group V
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen

    Group 15, don't forget the transition elements.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen

    Group 15, don't forget the transition elements.
    You don't usually count the transition metals at this level (well as level/higher, don't know about A2/advanced higher).
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    (Original post by laughylolly)
    You don't usually count the transition metals at this level (well as level/higher, don't know about A2/advanced higher).
    But nitrogen is a Group 15 element in the current IUPAC definition.
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    You're both right. It depends what naming convention you use. The new IUPAC convention puts Nitrogen into group 15, whilst the way I've been taught is nitrogen is in group 5.
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    Nitrogen is still classed as group 5. I know they've just tried changing the way they teach A levels so to include transiton metelas as groups, but those of us who were taught it up to about last year are taught that N is in group 5. Which makes sense where the group = no of electrons in outer shell; which in turn is just much easier than including the transition metals which have completely different properties
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    I think the exam question should have stated which naming convention they wanted the answers in.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    But nitrogen is a Group 15 element in the current IUPAC definition.
    Well at Scottish Higher which is the equivalent to AS level we just learn them as Group 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 and 0.

    Maybe at university level or some parts of A2 you would refer to the groups like this but probably not at the level the OP's question is at.
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    (Original post by laughylolly)
    Well at Scottish Higher which is the equivalent to AS level we just learn them as Group 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 and 0.

    Maybe at university level or some parts of A2 you would refer to the groups like this but probably not at the level the OP's question is at.
    Basically what it is that very recently the IUPAC definition has changed so that the D block is also included in the group naming system, making the periodic table have 18 groups instead of the old version where it had 8 (which is what pretty much everyone who was taught chemistry up to about this year will have learned)

    I'm doing a chemistry based degree at uni, and I still use the old IUPAC definition of groups. I think its a hell of a lot more logical than the new one.
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    (Original post by Loz17)
    Basically what it is that very recently the IUPAC definition has changed so that the D block is also included in the group naming system, making the periodic table have 18 groups instead of the old version where it had 8 (which is what pretty much everyone who was taught chemistry up to about this year will have learned)

    I'm doing a chemistry based degree at uni, and I still use the old IUPAC definition of groups. I think its a hell of a lot more logical than the new one.
    Yeah it is a lot more logical but oh well, I guess they must of had some good reason to change it.
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    Nitrogen in group 15! Whose daft idea was that? The whole point of groups is to indicate similar chemical properties based on electron configuration. Hence, 5 outer electrons = group V

    Not rocket science, really.

    (Please note that the above rant is aimed at the blazer-wearing gentlemen in smoke filled rooms at the IUPAC, not at the OP)
 
 
 
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