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Is it immoral to not tell people talking in other languages that you understand them? Watch

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    If they were bing rude to you, you could of said something to freak them out :cool: otherwise leave it.

    When I came to the UK to live, some idiot thought that I didn't understand English (despite the fact I had been in the school for a year and have an English mum :confused:) so was talking about me rudely, I played along not understanding and then at the end of the day told him I had understood everything... while adding a few choice words of my own about him, boy was he red faced not sure what happened to him after that as I never saw him again
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    I know that I listen in to people who speak in another language that I know; not on purpose but it is interesting!

    If you are going to be nosey - just don't get caught
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    (Original post by tehFrance)
    If they were bing rude to you, you could of said something to freak them out :cool: otherwise leave it.

    When I came to the UK to live, some idiot thought that I didn't understand English (despite the fact I had been in the school for a year and have an English mum :confused:) so was talking about me rudely, I played along not understanding and then at the end of the day told him I had understood everything... while adding a few choice words of my own about him, boy was he red faced not sure what happened to him after that as I never saw him again
    Haha similar situation happened to me.. its great to see their face when they realise that you understand what they've said!
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    I think that's it's none of your business what language people speak.
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    Where's the fun in telling them?

    It's even better when you know they're talking about you, believing you don't understand just for you to come over and say "Ich kann dir verstehen!" :rofl: Good times!
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    (Original post by Lizia)
    I'd say it's more immoral on the part of the people deliberately using their own language as some kind of private code. If someone who doesn't speak your language is present, then you speak in a language that you can all understand, or you wait to speak privately. I notice a lot of foreign people think it's appropriate to make asides in their own language while speaking English to the group as a whole. Or think that *****ing about other people in their native language is fine if that person can't understand you. It's incredibley rude, and frustrates me so much.

    Although it does give me the chance to verbally ***** slap them on the occasion that I can in fact understand their language. An Italian woman spent ten minutes *****ing about me because she heard me tell my mum I'd eaten McDonalds that day, calling me 'the worst kind of tourist'. Her face was priceless when I told her where to go, in Italian.
    this hahahahahahaha!

    I agree with what you are saying.
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    they probably only speak in their native language because its easier.
    Although one of the rugby teams at uni used it tactically, while they were playing they were telling each other where to go in welsh but one of my flatmates who was playing against them is welsh so knew exactly what they were going to do.
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    A few years ago a friend of mine from South Africa came over to stay. He said he was on the bus in London and heard two guys ****ging off some other people nearby and they were doing it in Afrikaans not realising there was another South African nearby who could understand and speak it.

    He should have showed them up.
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    (Original post by PinkMobilePhone)
    when i was a kid, my mother always used to speak to me in polish if she wanted to point out some offensive observation on somebody she might see passing in the street (like "wow that person is really really fat&quot. it really annoyed me that she felt the need to be rude about other people behind their back tbh.

    she couldn't do it these days, there's more poles in this country than god knows what lol. they'd all understand what she was saying.
    So your mothers Polish? Or she just knows the language?

    (Original post by silverbolt)
    where i work we have people a lot of people who are bilingual in English and an Asian language (kurdish, hindi etc) and they talk in thier own language at time even though its against company policy. the only time it bothers me is if they are sat at a table with myself and others then i say something as its just rude.
    When I used to live in Mauritius, the offical language is English but people mainly speak either French or Creole especially in the schools. In the schools I went to the kids were also encouraged to speak English and Creole was basically forbidden to speak.

    Some kids still did it though.
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    I had two girls speaking French in the library the other week, rather loudly, going on about how one of those girls was cheating on her boyfriend with some guy called Adam and how she really, really wants to have a one night stand with Simon. Then she said she doesn't trust her boyfriend and that he'll probably cheat on her as soon as he gets the chance but 'it doesn't matter' because she's got Adam and Simon to choose from if it all falls apart.

    I turned around and, in English, said: 'I'm surprised you haven't gone for Michael yet, he LOVES French girls!'

    They shut up and walked away while swearing at me under their breath.
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    A friend of mine lived in China for a year, and when she was at the airport one time she heard a woman ****ging her off to her daughter, in Chinese, saying how disgusting these foreigners were etc.
    My friend turned round, and in perfect Chinese, said "You should be more careful, b****, people might understand what you're saying."
    Classic!
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    (Original post by thunder_chunky)
    So your mothers Polish? Or she just knows the language?
    Born in England, but both her parents were Polish from Poland (they came to England straight after WWII - my grandad was a desert rat in Monte Casino during the war, and my grandma was in a concentration camp in Hamburg. They met on the way to England after the war ended, as they had both decided to start new lives in England rather than returning to Poland). So my mam was raised speaking Polish at home.
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    I take a language module, and it's quite small, so there are only 12 of us in the classroom. 9 are Chinese and 3 (including me) are White. They talk to each other in Chinese so much. All the time, especially after exams they're discussing what answers they gave together, me and the other two white people just sit there looking awkward.

    I can understand if it's your native language and it's easier to speak. But I do feel kind of left out.
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    No.
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    If it's amongst adults, I would think that it is more impolite that they are talking in another language knowing you are there.
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    I don't tell them, I mean it's rude if people you know just started talking in other languages especially when you're around with them.
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    (Original post by PinkMobilePhone)
    Born in England, but both her parents were Polish from Poland (they came to England straight after WWII - my grandad was a desert rat in Monte Casino during the war, and my grandma was in a concentration camp in Hamburg. They met on the way to England after the war ended, as they had both decided to start new lives in England rather than returning to Poland). So my mam was raised speaking Polish at home.
    Sh*t, Monte Casino and concentration camps, what a tough time. My paternal grandmother was a Czech Jew escaping the Nazi's.
    Anyway so our fluent in Polish? Maybe then you know when a Polish plumber is trying to rip you off.
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    (Original post by thunder_chunky)
    Sh*t, Monte Casino and concentration camps, what a tough time. My paternal grandmother was a Czech Jew escaping the Nazi's.
    Anyway so our fluent in Polish? Maybe then you know when a Polish plumber is trying to rip you off.
    No sadly I'm not. Although my grandma came to live with us when I was 10 (she died just before I was 15) she used to speak half English half Polish around the house at that point. So I'd get really weird half sentences coming from her, where like the first half of the sentence would be in polish and then she'd throw something English on the end like "cup of tea" lol.

    I did go to Polish school for a while as a child, plus I did a year's course in beginner's Polish in uni to make up my credits, but I still can't get the hang of the grammar one tiny bit. French I can do. Spanish just about. Italian just about. Polish grammar though that's something else entirely!

    I'm basically full of useless Polish vocabulary, that I can't for the life of me correctly string together to make a coherent sentence.

    My mam, if she says something in Polish to me, I can GENERALLY get the gist of what she's saying, but these days she doesn't speak Polish any more really, not since my grandma died. Only if she wants to whisper something to me that she thinks people can't understand lol, but even that's very rare nowadays as I only see my mam occasionally.
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    Overhearing someone speaking a foreign language is no more unethical/ rude than evesdropping on someone speaking English. They're the ones making assumptions that no-one will understand them, they should be more careful if it's a private conversation .

    About the international students, as good as their English may be, they'll obviously be more fluent in their home language so it's entirely possible (probable) that they were using it for convienence rather than to be secretive. I mean if you were talking to some English people in France, and were speaking just to them, would you use French? I wouldn't.
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    (Original post by LostInLaw)
    We had this on a sixth form trip where a French woman made some comments about our group to her friend while we were sat at a cafe. My friend turned round and explained to her in perfect French that she was quite capable of understanding and would the woman mind not airing her opinions quite so loudly. I've never seen someone so lost for words.
    Yeah, it's usually just funny more than anything else. (:
 
 
 
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