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    After doing a BSc in Computer Science, would going on to do an MPhil in Advanced Computer Science/Software Engineering be worth it in terms of employability? Also, the MPhil would be studied at a much more prestigious university.
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    As far as I know a MPhil is not really a proper degree, you're registered as MPhil when you start a PhD.
    But I think it is much better to first try to get a MSc or Research Master in your field before considering doing research.
    I'm not sure you've got enough hindsight with a BSc.
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    (Original post by steepest descent)
    As far as I know a MPhil is not really a proper degree, you're registered as MPhil when you start a PhD.
    But I think it is much better to first try to get a MSc or Research Master in your field before considering doing research.
    I'm not sure you've got enough hindsight with a BSc.
    A Master Of Philosophy isn't a proper degree?
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    (Original post by steepest descent)
    In Science, many people do a PhD and do not end up in academia... A PhD is essential as soon as you want to do research, so it also works in industry. A PhD is also not only about research, but learning a lot of different skills, usually useful for your job or more generally in life.
    That's fair enough, but the OP is a historian. A PhD in history isn't really going to improve your chances of working in industry.
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    (Original post by steepest descent)
    As far as I know a MPhil is not really a proper degree, you're registered as MPhil when you start a PhD.
    Of course MPhils are proper degrees. 'MPhil' can just mean a variety of different things - it doesn't even necessarily mean a masters by research. He's clearly thinking of Cambridge, where it's a one-year taught course: http://www.cam.ac.uk/guide/pgcourses/mphil/acs.html
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    I'm getting confused again tbh lol :P I just want to work as a writer - I was just wondering whether a postgrad degree would be useful to me, perhaps making me better able to research my books?
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    (Original post by Persie)
    I'm getting confused again tbh lol :P I just want to work as a writer - I was just wondering whether a postgrad degree would be useful to me, perhaps making me better able to research my books?
    It may do - it depends on what you feel your limitations are at the moment.

    There's writing and there's writing. Personally I feel that doing a postgrad degree has opened up new subject areas for me to write about. I think that I had a bit of a lack of structure before, and I tended to stick to what I knew. These days I'd be more confident about tackling more heavyweight material - development issues, media analysis, political science etc, whereas before I tended to stick either to travel or to fiction. I'm not sure it's helped improve my research skills other than giving me more practice in deploying them.

    But I think the point being made is that a postgrad degree will not magically give you the ability to write academically, nor will it help particularly as an entry to writing as a career. The world of writing and publishing doesn't set quite the same store on these things as other industries.

    I think a rather good example is Antony Beevor, who never went to university at all - he went to Sandhurst straight from Winchester. Of course since then he's been awarded all manner of honorary degrees and visiting professorships. But he started out writing copy for a food company as a marketing executive.
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    (Original post by Persie)
    I'm getting confused again tbh lol :P I just want to work as a writer - I was just wondering whether a postgrad degree would be useful to me, perhaps making me better able to research my books?
    The thing is, if you want to write books, as a historian, then really you should go into academia, or at least have taken the various degrees [etc] open to you. A BA in History is nowhere near enough to make you a good historian. You get the basics, but enough to write a book? No way. A masters will develop this, and a research masters perhaps more so than a taught one. A Phd will take you further again, so you have a good understanding and knowledge of how to research, how to fomulate complex ideas and write long amounts of text. A 10,000 word dissertation at the end of your BA will hardly set you up for that.
    Not to mention, most people who work within history/have any sense of history will be interested in using material from respected academics, though I admit there is some room for 'popular history' but even those tend to be by people with a certain level of historical study behind them.
    I don't understand why you'd want to write history but not be an historian...?
    Not to mention doing a Phd will probably allow you to work out how publishing etc works, which you wont experience through a BA.
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    I want to write "popular history" along the lines of Antonia Fraser, David Starkey etc. But one of them has a doctorate and the other doesn't so it leaves me none the wiser :P
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    (Original post by Persie)
    I want to write "popular history" along the lines of Antonia Fraser, David Starkey etc. But one of them has a doctorate and the other doesn't so it leaves me none the wiser :P
    Not to mention Antonia Fraser comes from a very well connected family, which would have more than helped in getting her work published
    I'd say if you want to write good history, become an historian.
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    (Original post by Persie)
    I want to write "popular history" along the lines of Antonia Fraser, David Starkey etc. But one of them has a doctorate and the other doesn't so it leaves me none the wiser :P
    Perhaps the more relevant fact here is not whether one or the other has a doctorate, but that both are talented writers.

    I would argue that no amount of qualifications will make you one. But if you are one then perhaps a postgrad qualification would enable you to know your subject a little better.

    Then again, if I've understood correctly, you are not even at university yet. So in a sense all this is academic. Come back to it in 3 years and see how you feel.
 
 
 
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