Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    http://www.ukcle.ac.uk/resources/emp...ent/pupillage/

    per UK Centre for Legal Education^^^

    omg this is terrible, i never knew it was that bad i thought it was 1/8! plus loads of bvc grads have shelled out £18k for the bar plus living costs, and some also have outsnading masters fees.

    why would you want to gamble like that?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Because everyone who takes the BPTC has the personal conviction that THEY will be one of the lucky few who makes it. And to be honest, even if the chances were 1/8, that's still pretty terrible chances of making it...
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tony_ron)
    Because everyone who takes the BPTC has the personal conviction that THEY will be one of the lucky few who makes it. And to be honest, even if the chances were 1/8, that's still pretty terrible chances of making it...
    And if you dont have that conviction to get it, you dont stand a chance. Its a rediculously tough career to get into. Even if you get a pupillage, theres no guaruntee that chambers will keep you on after pupillage.

    badtimes that i want to do it :/
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tony_ron)
    Because everyone who takes the BPTC has the personal conviction that THEY will be one of the lucky few who makes it. And to be honest, even if the chances were 1/8, that's still pretty terrible chances of making it...
    here
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...1573974&page=2

    i calculated that given the fact you can make multiple applications on OLPAS (4) and you can reapply for up to 5 times, that for every 500 pupillages, there could be a maximum of 30,000 applications (forgetting people that drop out or go aborad). giving a 2% chance of an application being successful

    yet i got flamed by law students saying "omg the chances are 1 in 8, and if you exclud all the bad applicants who got 2:2s and lower than a VC, they are more like 1 in 4. so the chances of getting pupillage are teh same as the driving test pass rate in brentwood (28%)"

    and

    "you just have to work hard and be a good student" "those that didnt get it arent that good"

    whereas i would think the vast majority of bar applicants have 1st or 2:1, good GCSE and a lavels (b or above) and a VC and relavent work.

    it is hard.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shinytoy)
    here
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...1573974&page=2

    i calculated that given the fact you can make multiple applications on OLPAS (4) and you can reapply for up to 5 times, that for every 500 pupillages, there could be a maximum of 30,000 applications (forgetting people that drop out or go aborad). giving a 2% chance of an application being successful

    yet i got flamed by law students saying "omg the chances are 1 in 8, and if you exclud all the bad applicants who got 2:2s and lower than a VC, they are more like 1 in 4. so the chances of getting pupillage are teh same as the driving test pass rate in brentwood (28%)"

    and

    "you just have to work hard and be a good student" "those that didnt get it arent that good"

    whereas i would think the vast majority of bar applicants have 1st or 2:1, good GCSE and a lavels (b or above) and a VC and relavent work.

    it is hard.
    Awesome work on the other pupillage related thread by the way - really impressive stuff.

    I had wanted to reply but:

    (a) the thread was closed; and
    (b) despite my request for you to try and engage in some form of meaningful debate, it didn't long for you to regress to the juvenile "I bet you're still at school", "I bet you haven't done maths", "I bet you don't have a degree" sort of idiocy. Whilst you might think it conveys the impression of a cool, sassy, worldly-wise poster, it actually comes across as slightly deranged.

    Very happy to continue the debate as I'd like the opportunity to counter some of the points you made in the other thread. For example, my use of words such as "lengthening" and "shortening" are standard terms in respect of odds in the context of gambling. Given the nature of pupillage applications, and the relative arbitrariness of the process, this isn't inappropriate language to use. It reflects the fact that securing pupillage or a TC isn't a scientific process but has an enormous aspect of luck involved. Unlike, say, learning to drive in Brentwood.

    So, if you're capable of leaving the playground taunts to one side, then let's continue. If you don't think you can manage that, then I suggest you take a look at the editorial on the right hand side of a well-known blog from a silk called Simon Myerson who sets out what he thinks the chances of securing pupillage are. Low and behold, he indicates that the "odds" are approx 1:4 when you strip out those applicants who have little or no realistic chance of securing pupillage. That doesn't mean that the chances of securing pupillage are attractive - far from it. It means that only 1 in 4 excellent candidates (i.e. those with firsts/2:i, top 10 Unis, excellent ECs) can possibly be successful.

    http://pupillageandhowtogetit.wordpress.com/

    By the way, I'm afraid I am as ancient as you suspect if not a touch older. Whilst that may make me weird or freaky, it does mean that I come at these topics with a degree of experience (if not a particularly recent set of A levels).
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shinytoy)
    http://www.ukcle.ac.uk/resources/emp...ent/pupillage/

    per UK Centre for Legal Education^^^

    omg this is terrible, i never knew it was that bad i thought it was 1/8! plus loads of bvc grads have shelled out £18k for the bar plus living costs, and some also have outsnading masters fees.

    why would you want to gamble like that?
    The first thing to say is that I am older than Chalks; my admission certificate was signed by Lord Donaldson although I am also a part-time student.

    The original quote was:

    This means that the ratio of applicants to places is far higher, and indeed in some of the better known chambers can be as much as 400:1 (although these are of course multiple applications – many apply to several chambers)
    What that means is that for a chambers with two pupillages on offer, they get 800 applicants. You might think that figure is terrifying but for my successful but fairly run of the mill provincial solicitors' practice the equivalent figure would be 100:1.


    I am afraid that is the reality of life for would-be lawyers.

    However as Chalks has explained the effect of multiple applications coupled with a relatively high number of non-viable candidates means that the effective chance for a viable candidate is much greater. That is nevertheless cold comfort for the 75% of viable candidates who never get offered a pupillage.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: March 21, 2011
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.