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Which country in the world is the best from an objective viewpoint? watch

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    Malta
    Malta
    Malta
    Malta
    Malta
    Because its the Ultimate party/relax/take it easy/ awesome island
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    UK

    (We must be doing something right, why else would everyone be jumping on the bandwagon)
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    Germany comes to mind. Located in the heart of Europe, an economy built on very strong foundations (engineering and exports), very few natural disasters, great transport, a fairly low cost of living, political stability, financial prudence and a culture not too dissimilar to the uk.

    Germany also has a demographic crisis, but it's more immigrant-friendly than Japan.


    (Original post by LaughingBro)
    I thought it was Japan, especially Tokyo. South Korea sounds good too.
    Japan's a ticking timebomb - national debt is over double GDP, the workforce is shrinking, and demographics are disasterous (an upside down pyramid).

    (Original post by JamesyB)
    It may not be the best, but Iceland is an awesome place! Laid-back-ness to rival the Caribbean and it's a beautiful place. Only problem is they're economy probably isn't too good atm, but definitely somewhere to think about retiring too!

    Oh and the lack of sunlight during the winter and occasional earthquake, they aren't too strong though and feel really weird!
    Iceland owes around 7 times it's gdp in banking liabilites!
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    (Original post by Gofre)
    Finland's supposedly looking very good from the statistics I've seen. Second in World Education rankings, high up on life expectancy charts, all that good stuff. But they have no fish and chip shops, so life must be awful XD
    Aren't the suicide rates really high?
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    (Original post by Daniiel)
    Ever heard of the United Nations Human Development Index? :awesome:
    That is just one element of what I wanted to be a multifaceted look at the 'best country'. For instance Australia is currently second in the UN HDI, but I could see it slipping a fair few points in the future if their drought continues or if global warming actually happens to the extent of some predictions and it just turns into an arid desert. The US is also 4th, and I can easily think of 10 different places that would be better to bring up my children in safety and security.
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    Aren't the suicide rates really high?
    Only like 8 more per hundred thousand people than France, but it is treble ours. I would say it was completely sun light related but apparently Kazakhstan, Hungary, Slovenia, and Sri Lanka are all up the top 10, so there must be other factors that come into play.
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    Denmark seems like the ideal place to live unless you hate paying a significant proportion in taxes. they seem to take care of their citizens well tho and the high taxes work as an incentive to learn and do what you like doing rather than doing something for the money.
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    (Original post by Fusion)
    Germany comes to mind. Located in the heart of Europe, an economy built on very strong foundations (engineering and exports), very few natural disasters, great transport, a fairly low cost of living, political stability, financial prudence and a culture not too dissimilar to the uk.

    Germany also has a demographic crisis, but it's more immigrant-friendly than Japan.




    Japan's a ticking timebomb - national debt is over double GDP, the workforce is shrinking, and demographics are disasterous (an upside down pyramid).



    Iceland owes around 7 times it's gdp in banking liabilites!
    Absolutely agree with you.
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    (Original post by Elipsis)
    Taking into account safety from natural disasters, wild animals, neighbours, education, opportunities for you and your children, healthcare, weather, general stability, and the future of that country (i.e. global warming, economic shifts, ageing populations), which would you say is the best?

    I am inclined to say Britain and more specifically England. Although healthcare, opportunities, education, weather, and an ageing population, is slightly worse than the rest of Europe this is offset by the fact that our chances of invasion are relatively low (being that we are an island). We also benefit heavily from being at the centre of time - 8 hours behind China and 5-8 hours in front of America, which makes Britain an almost indispensable country in business terms. Our language is also the international language, which is a clear advantage.

    Having said that, it may well be that Scandinavia - in particular Norway and Finland, are the best. They have the best education and healthcare, as well as opportunities. When and if global warming does occur there should be sizeable benefits to these countries - however the drawbacks could be immense, with much of the world fighting for their land. Norway also has an extremely large sovereign wealth fund, especially when compared to the size of their population. For the present (the next 50 years or so), I cannot see either of these countries ever becoming involved in anything but peacekeeping missions, and I also cannot see them being invaded either. The weather is a rather large draw back - with a fairly large portion of the year being almost sunless, and an almost identical chunk being sunny almost 24 hours a day. The obvious problem with moving to either of these countries for my children's benefit is that I don't stand a chance of learning their languages beyond the very basics, which would be very rude indeed.

    So what do you think? Which country is objectively the best? Where would you raise your children?
    There are other factors, than political or economic. There are cultural factors also.

    I don't believe in objective things or absolutes, but the UK being the centre of time is historical accident. And it's likely that English will not be the lingua franca forever, why should it?
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    Greece
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    (Original post by rajandkwameali)
    There are other factors, than political or economic. There are cultural factors also.

    I don't believe in objective things or absolutes, but the UK being the centre of time is historical accident. And it's likely that English will not be the lingua franca forever, why should it?
    It's likely to stay that way for a long time (I'm assuming we're talking about the language not the culture)... Because it's the language used internationally in finance, and it's important to some of the more powerful countries in the world (UK and USA mainly).

    That could change... But for a long time to come, at least, English will be an important language for people to learn worldwide.
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    (Original post by rajandkwameali)
    There are other factors, than political or economic. There are cultural factors also.

    I don't believe in objective things or absolutes, but the UK being the centre of time is historical accident. And it's likely that English will not be the lingua franca forever, why should it?
    If there are other factors that are more important to you that political or economic that's fine, list your country and why you think it's the best. Most 'good' countries though have a relatively uniform culture, as I have noticed no one has picked China or India. English might not be the lingua franca forever and ever, but the international community has already adopted it to talk to one another so it probably will be for a sizeable amount of time (over 100 years). It would take another empire creating country to go round the world and make everyone speak their language.

    How are you arguing that the UK being at the centre of time is an historical accident? We created the first railways, which required the first consistently accurate times across the country and the world, which meant that we got to set the times for the entire world from Greenwich. Of course the fact that we were responsible for 72% of shipping worldwide also made us a prime candidate. Even if it was an historical accident (which I think we can say it wasn't) it is still a pretty big bonus for the UK.
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    Either Norway or Sweden, probably.
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    It depends who you are.

    Scandinavia is often cited as a good example of a place to live but that is probably more the case if you are a person of ordinary financial means, who has grown up there. When it comes to where to move to if you are successful and wealthy and looking for somewhere to emigrate to, bear in mind that you will pay far more in taxes in the Scandinavian countries than you would in the UK. They have a comprehensive welfare state and high standard public services but thats because the state is a big part of their society.

    Here's an article about Sweden in 2008, yes it's three years old but broadly should be similar to the situation now, high pension provision, 2/3 of the electorate either working for the public sector or drawing benefits, long periods of parental leave guaranteed. The downside is most people pay between 49% and 60% of their income back to the state through various state and local government taxes. So if you are rich and wanting to move there then I'm sure they will welcome you but you will be paying most of your income for the generous provisions which everybody else enjoys.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2008...burden-welfare

    On Switzerland....double edged sword here. One of my aunts has lived there for about 15 years. It's often cited as the place to move to if you have made it financially eg its a popular destination for hedge fund managers. The pros are it's nice visually, has efficient public services, good career opportunities, and relatively low tax. The cons are the cost of living is very high. In the UK, things feel expensive but if you are a streetwise consumer you can usually find bargains, firms have always got some form of rotating sale on so you can find ways to get things cheaply if you look around. In Switzerland for whatever reason they don't have a culture of sales, things cost what they cost, and it's generally high. I used to think it was just an expensive place to go as a tourist but my aunt assures me you pay those prices for everything all the time. The big drain on your income is health insurance which is very expensive, that eats up a lot of the advantages of lower income tax, and if you have kids and want to get them into a good school especially an international school it's difficult and again is very expensive. The other problem is Switzerland has a lot of red tape and petty bureaucracy, it's easy to get fines for breaking some rule if you don't know how the country works. As regards crime, my aunt is in Zurich and she has a lot more security measures on her house than people do in the UK and she has had problems with break-ins, some areas of the city are no go. Outside of Zurich it's probably quite a safe country.

    Having said this, she's lived there for a while and has no intention of leaving, she has a good job there - but her advice is always that people in the UK looking to emigrate to Switzerland need to do more research than they typically do. You get a lot of people especially young people who are working in the financial sector, who have the idea of Switzerland as a goal in mind thinking it is low tax and the place to accumulate money. If you want that go to the Gulf states or somewhere like Belize, Switzerland is low tax but it has ways of making your money disappear in other ways and it's not the place to go if you don't like bureaucracy or red tape.
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    It depends who you are.

    Scandinavia is often cited as a good example of a place to live but that is probably more the case if you are a person of ordinary financial means, who has grown up there. When it comes to where to move to if you are successful and wealthy and looking for somewhere to emigrate to, bear in mind that you will pay far more in taxes in the Scandinavian countries than you would in the UK. They have a comprehensive welfare state and high standard public services but thats because the state is a big part of their society.

    Here's an article about Sweden in 2008, yes it's three years old but broadly should be similar to the situation now, high pension provision, 2/3 of the electorate either working for the public sector or drawing benefits, long periods of parental leave guaranteed. The downside is most people pay between 49% and 60% of their income back to the state through various state and local government taxes. So if you are rich and wanting to move there then I'm sure they will welcome you but you will be paying most of your income for the generous provisions which everybody else enjoys.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2008...burden-welfare

    On Switzerland....double edged sword here. One of my aunts has lived there for about 15 years. It's often cited as the place to move to if you have made it financially eg its a popular destination for hedge fund managers. The pros are it's nice visually, has efficient public services, good career opportunities, and relatively low tax. The cons are the cost of living is very high. In the UK, things feel expensive but if you are a streetwise consumer you can usually find bargains, firms have always got some form of rotating sale on so you can find ways to get things cheaply if you look around. In Switzerland for whatever reason they don't have a culture of sales, things cost what they cost, and it's generally high. I used to think it was just an expensive place to go as a tourist but my aunt assures me you pay those prices for everything all the time. The big drain on your income is health insurance which is very expensive, that eats up a lot of the advantages of lower income tax, and if you have kids and want to get them into a good school especially an international school it's difficult and again is very expensive. The other problem is Switzerland has a lot of red tape and petty bureaucracy, it's easy to get fines for breaking some rule if you don't know how the country works. As regards crime, my aunt is in Zurich and she has a lot more security measures on her house than people do in the UK and she has had problems with break-ins, some areas of the city are no go. Outside of Zurich it's probably quite a safe country.

    Having said this, she's lived there for a while and has no intention of leaving, she has a good job there - but her advice is always that people in the UK looking to emigrate to Switzerland need to do more research than they typically do. You get a lot of people especially young people who are working in the financial sector, who have the idea of Switzerland as a goal in mind thinking it is low tax and the place to accumulate money. If you want that go to the Gulf states or somewhere like Belize, Switzerland is low tax but it has ways of making your money disappear in other ways and it's not the place to go if you don't like bureaucracy or red tape.
    This is very interesting. My motivation in trying to choose the best country was less about taxes for me, and more about the future for my children and their children. I wanted to take into account that they might not be successful, in which case places like Norway would be great for them. If I knew 100% they weren't ever going to be poor in their lives i'd probably choose somewhere like America, but the risk of ending up without health insurance seems too great to me.
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    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    It's likely to stay that way for a long time (I'm assuming we're talking about the language not the culture)... Because it's the language used internationally in finance, and it's important to some of the more powerful countries in the world (UK and USA mainly).

    That could change... But for a long time to come, at least, English will be an important language for people to learn worldwide.
    It depends on the global power balance, which is why English became widespread in the first place. If the UK and US become less powerful, then why use English?
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    (Original post by rajandkwameali)
    It depends on the global power balance, which is why English became widespread in the first place. If the UK and US become less powerful, then why use English?
    Well like I said, it'll still take a long time for those things to change, it's likely to stay this way for a long time.
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    (Original post by Elipsis)
    If there are other factors that are more important to you that political or economic that's fine, list your country and why you think it's the best. Most 'good' countries though have a relatively uniform culture, as I have noticed no one has picked China or India. English might not be the lingua franca forever and ever, but the international community has already adopted it to talk to one another so it probably will be for a sizeable amount of time (over 100 years). It would take another empire creating country to go round the world and make everyone speak their language.

    How are you arguing that the UK being at the centre of time is an historical accident? We created the first railways, which required the first consistently accurate times across the country and the world, which meant that we got to set the times for the entire world from Greenwich. Of course the fact that we were responsible for 72% of shipping worldwide also made us a prime candidate. Even if it was an historical accident (which I think we can say it wasn't) it is still a pretty big bonus for the UK.
    I was confused what you meant by good. There are lots of factors in how good a country is, or why/how a country should be respected.

    I personally think Canada is ideal, it has a high living standard, and is a socially liberal/tolerant country. The USA is similar, but it depends on the region of the country. In Europe, Scandinavia has high living standards, but are too stuffy for my tastes.
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    I think it's hard to beat the UK. I know people complain about it but there are fantastic opportunities here, especially in London, which is why people from all over the world head to London. If I was to leave the UK I would be looking at the south of France, Germany or one of the Scandinavian countries.
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    For me, it's France.

    Incredibly rich cultural heritage, heathy and great lifestyle, perfect weather, beautiful and clean cities with amazing architecture, fantastic cuisine, beautiful and varied natural landscape (within Europe, it's just behind Norway and Austria IMO) , great education, (probably) best heathcare in the world, great + cheap public transport, economically stable, cultured populace, little amount of celebrity culture, friendly people (except Paris) , very attractive women, family life is still important, people actually enjoy life and don't work excessive hours so they can drink themselves into a stupor every weekend and then roast on a beach in southern Spain once a year for a week.....

    There is a reason why the British professional classes are flocking to France in droves, and I'm British btw.

    The only negatives I can see are: 1) the excessive amouts of bureaucracy, 2) there is more crime than other countries in Europe (excluding the UK) but it's worth bearing in mind that the serious crime in France is commited almost exclusively by ethnic minorities within immigrant communities (not a positive, but at least you have virtually no chance of being bottled by some pissed up, chavvy, piece of white trash outside a greasy kebab van)
 
 
 
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