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Film Fanatics - Chat Thread II watch

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    (Original post by PoGo HoPz)
    Totally agree with this. I mean, Heath Ledger's Joker was written and performed perfectly. There was both darkness and insanity there, but at the same time it was so realistic, which is what I loved about him. There was no comic-booky vibe to his character. Instead, there was a sense that this kinda guy could actually exist and do all that stuff. That's what Nolan's trilogy's all about, tbh.
    Did you really think so? I thought Ledger's Joker was an enjoyable enough character, but I don't really think I could see him in that form (or played to that extent - in a plausible way) outside of something similar to the Batman universe. :p:

    Bane's essentially supposed to be a mindless juggernaut, yet the way Nolan wrote him just made no sense and didn't suit the character at all. It just felt like changing him for the sake of changing him, and it didn't work like it worked for the Joker, imo.
    This is just a common misconception, as Mess. has already pointed out. :yep: If anything, Bane still isn't intelligent/resourceful enough.

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    Assuming Bruce couldn't/wouldn't somehow get out of the pit was utterly stupid in the most clichéd way.



    (Original post by Isambard Kingdom Brunel)
    Best male acting performance ever was from F. Murray Abraham as Salieiri in Amadeus (1984).

    Discuss.
    Still need to get round to watching Amaedus. :sigh: Partly been putting it off because I would quite like to read Shaffer's play first.
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    layer cake vs skyfall?

    skyfall wasnt that good
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    (Original post by Abiraleft)
    Did you really think so? I thought Ledger's Joker was an enjoyable enough character, but I don't really think I could see him in that form (or played to that extent - in a plausible way) outside of something similar to the Batman universe. :p:



    This is just a common misconception, as Mess. has already pointed out. :yep: If anything, Bane still isn't intelligent/resourceful enough.

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    Assuming Bruce couldn't/wouldn't somehow get out of the pit was utterly stupid in the most clichéd way.





    Still need to get round to watching Amaedus. :sigh: Partly been putting it off because I would quite like to read Shaffer's play first.
    I think Nolans universe was meant to be exaggerated reality and in that context I think that the Joker was utterly believable and really helped to enhance the world. Scarecrow was similar even if he is a pretty annoying character who I've never liked in any version of Batman.

    Bane, to me, was just over the top in almost every sense. He brought nothing to the world that another generic character couldn't have done and due to how 'comic book' he was, it took me completely out of the world crafted in the first two films.

    Also, does anybody think that if Ledger hadn't died that the Joker would still have been the main villain in the 3rd film? To me it would have been insane not to use him again but I imagine they would have tried to use both him and another character which would have taken it way too far into the comic book realm.


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    Bane may or may not be an effective villain (or certainly up to the standard set by Ledger and the Joker in the previous film), but I liked how he kept within the theme of the trilogy. I think as Nolan mentioned once, the trilogy is about the inner evil, willingness to do evil or corruption in Gotham citizens - this is what Ras was about, destroying Gotham because there was no redemption for its citizens. And there is a move to show these in different ways in each film. In the first film we have Scarecrow who manifests these inner condition through the use of the fear gas (and thus Gotham destroys itself that way). In the second film, we have the Joker who manifests this inner condition through anarchy. And in the final film, we have Bane who manifests this inner condition through the destruction of order.

    Scarecrow believed the inner evil was, well, inside you and it could be released through fear. The Joker believed that the inner evil was induced by the societal order and "rules" as a result of conditioning and it could be released by breaking the rules, like he did with Harvey and attempted to do with the boat scene. Bane believed this inner evil had embedded itself within the social institutions (courts, prisons, businesses and banks) and that it could be released by destroying these institutions.

    The problem is two fold, this theme isn't played strongly enough in the films (with the Joker's story the only one approaching perfection) and Bane's story becomes unnecessarily convoluted by concerning itself with the physical threat (a bomb) rather than playing up the overarching themes of what Bane is trying to achieve. I mean, let's face it, having a bomb with a countdown and making Gotham 'suffer' meanwhile isn't a good enough excuse to get a 'message' across, and reeks of the bad cliché present in every James Bond film ever. Bane should have also have been more of a villain in his own right, not just aligned with another villain seeking revenge. He breaks a few inconsequential necks and then defeats Batman once. But after that, it's downhill for him and there is no merit in his character walking around delivering monologues.
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    (Original post by philistine)
    I just finished watching Les Tontons Flingueurs. I swear, Lino Ventura, in several scenes, looks like the doppelgänger of Robert de Niro. The likeness is uncanny. The film itself was good, although I did have a bone to pick with the subtitles. Being a speaker of the language myself, I noticed several inconsistencies- some more grave than others- which I couldn't help but think might have detracted from the overall experience.

    7/10

    I'm just now discovering the Mesrine duology. Vincent Cassel is one of my favourite actors, so I have good faith in this, despite the lackluster ratings. Will report back.



    Are you suggesting Tarantino is the greatest director of all? If so, you clearly have- at the very least- a profound misunderstanding of the man's work, not to mention cult Japanese cinema, post-noir crime/gang cinema, and several other important matters. Tarantino, as I'm sure you don't already know, watched the entire filmography of the legendary Seijun Suzuki, and soon after ripped off all of his hallmarks, motifs, and signature style- completely; the smoking gun to this declaration being 東京流れ者.

    Saying that, I'm not anti-Tarantino at all; merely a person who gives praise where it is due, and derision in very much the same way.
    Only seen Derailed and Black Swan with him in (so not a lot) and have A Dangerous Method, Eastern Promises and Irreversible happening to be on my 'to source' list. Would be interested in seeing more, his best roles. Any suggestions?

    (Original post by Isambard Kingdom Brunel)
    Best male acting performance ever was from F. Murray Abraham as Salieiri in Amadeus (1984).

    Discuss.
    Peter Finch in Network would be mine. F. Murray Abraham's portrayal of Salieri is outstanding though. Amadeus wouldn't have been half as good as it is without a huge performance for that role.
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    (Original post by Mess.)
    Also, does anybody think that if Ledger hadn't died that the Joker would still have been the main villain in the 3rd film? To me it would have been insane not to use him again but I imagine they would have tried to use both him and another character which would have taken it way too far into the comic book realm.
    I would've had him loosely involved in the storyline, but not as a main character. I thought having Bane as a main character was interesting, and like you said, having several antagonists would've seemed too comic booky. :yep:
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    Are you suggesting Tarantino is the greatest director of all? If so, you clearly have- at the very least- a profound misunderstanding of the man's work, not to mention cult Japanese cinema, post-noir crime/gang cinema, and several other important matters. Tarantino, as I'm sure you don't already know, watched the entire filmography of the legendary Seijun Suzuki, and soon after ripped off all of his hallmarks, motifs, and signature style- completely; the smoking gun to this declaration being 東京流れ者.

    Saying that, I'm not anti-Tarantino at all; merely a person who gives praise where it is due, and derision in very much the same way.[/QUOTE]

    Nope, just saying he's got some great films under his belt
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    (Original post by Hugo Rune)
    Only seen Derailed and Black Swan with him in (so not a lot) and have A Dangerous Method, Eastern Promises and Irreversible happening to be on my 'to source' list. Would be interested in seeing more, his best roles. Any suggestions?
    .
    Oh man, you just listed three top drawer pictures. I'd also like to add La Haine and the Mesrine duology (watched them both last night- great stuff).

    Has anyone seen the new Leos Carax flick, Holy Motors? It was played at the last Cannes festival, though it's only just been lea- err, made available.

    Let's just say that it's... interesting. Disturbing, arbitrary, yet very interesting. Kylie Minogue makes a cameo, too.
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    (Original post by Colonel.)
    I hated that film. No idea why. Didn't enjoy it.
    It's not a great film, I just found it quite easy to watch and some of the characters were hilarious. It's a lot like American Graffiti which is a much better film in my opinion.

    Also watched The Machinest recently, thought that was pretty good.
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    (Original post by philistine)
    Oh man, you just listed three top drawer pictures. I'd also like to add La Haine and the Mesrine duology (watched them both last night- great stuff).
    Cheers.
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    Just finished watching Ichikawa's The Burmese Harp. An absolutely breathtaking film, with a stunning score. Criterion really need to get on Ichikawa's case, as I believe this is the only film they've released from him.

    9/10
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    'World's Greatest Dad' is a ****ing weird but brilliant film.

    Best I've seen of Robin Williams in a while.
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    Anyone know the name of the music from 1:25-1:50ish? I annoyingly can't find it.

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    (Original post by Deshi)
    Anyone know the name of the music from 1:25-1:50ish? I annoyingly can't find it.

    That's the same track that was in the Hobbit trailer. It's Brand X Music - Dragons Demise. Trailer music, ala Two Steps From Hell and Immediate Music, never really gets credited much.
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    Not gonna lie, Pitch Perfect looks like it could be the worst best film ever.

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    (Original post by Ape Gone Insane)
    That's the same track that was in the Hobbit trailer. It's Brand X Music - Dragons Demise. Trailer music, ala Two Steps From Hell and Immediate Music, never really gets credited much.
    Cheers mate :yy:

    Epic sounding music.
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    What did you guys think of The Master? I saw it today, and thought it was fairly interesting.
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    Me and my housemates are watching a one or two harry Potter films every week starting from this weekend to try and get to the end before we break for Christmas. After watching the first one tonight it dawned on me how much I miss having a Harry Potter film to look forward to, it was the first film I ever watched at the cinema. I wanna go to Hogwarts :cry2:
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    (Original post by Deshi)
    Me and my housemates are watching a one or two harry Potter films every week starting from this weekend to try and get to the end before we break for Christmas. After watching the first one tonight it dawned on me how much I miss having a Harry Potter film to look forward to, it was the first film I ever watched at the cinema. I wanna go to Hogwarts :cry2:
    Whoah, that makes me feel old. My first movie at the cinema was The Little Mermaid...

    (Original post by cambo211)
    'World's Greatest Dad' is a ****ing weird but brilliant film.

    Best I've seen of Robin Williams in a while.
    I enjoyed it, but the ending was a complete cop out. Amazing soundtrack though! I love these songs:



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    By far the most touchest suicide scene I've seen in a film too
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    (Original post by Svenjamin)
    Whoah, that makes me feel old. My first movie at the cinema was The Little Mermaid...


    I enjoyed it, but the ending was a complete cop out. Amazing soundtrack though! I love these songs:



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    By far the most touchest suicide scene I've seen in a film too
    You remember your first cinema film? I have no idea what mine was. I know I saw The World is Not Enough in 1999 when I was 9. I can't remember a film before that though. I remember going to the 3D IMAX as a kid though probably before that.
 
 
 
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