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    I've been going over my Warwick MSc conditional acceptance letter again, and it still seems impossible for me to achieve the grade that they stated. The condition on the letter reads:

    "This offer is conditional upon you:
    - Achieving an average GPA of 3.3 or above across all of the modules of your degree and providing an attested/certified copy of the degree transcript and certificate.
    - Not choosing Economics as an elective as you already have an extensive economics background in your undergraduate degree."

    Am I understanding this correctly? They want an overall average of 3.3 over all the courses in all 5 years of my undergrad degree? Because my first year was terrible, even if I finish with a 4.0 average in April my cumulative gpa will still only be 3.1

    While my last three years have been very high grades, did they not even look at all my years, or consider that it might be impossible to meet the required condition? The office told me there was something like a 15% acceptance rate, so why would they give me an offer when it is essentially impossible for me to meet the grade condition?! Now I'm really starting to panic, as I am supposed to firm by Friday.
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    (Original post by december2)
    I've been going over my Warwick MSc conditional acceptance letter again, and it still seems impossible for me to achieve the grade that they stated. The condition on the letter reads:

    "This offer is conditional upon you:
    - Achieving an average GPA of 3.3 or above across all of the modules of your degree and providing an attested/certified copy of the degree transcript and certificate.
    - Not choosing Economics as an elective as you already have an extensive economics background in your undergraduate degree."

    Am I understanding this correctly? They want an overall average of 3.3 over all the courses in all 5 years of my undergrad degree? Because my first year was terrible, even if I finish with a 4.0 average in April my cumulative gpa will still only be 3.1

    While my last three years have been very high grades, did they not even look at all my years, or consider that it might be impossible to meet the required condition? The office told me there was something like a 15% acceptance rate, so why would they give me an offer when it is essentially impossible for me to meet the grade condition?! Now I'm really starting to panic, as I am supposed to firm by Friday.
    The best thing to do would be to call them on Monday morning to clarify what the terms of the offer actually are. If it really is what you suspect, explain to them that it isn't possible for you to achieve that average because of your weak performance during the first year of your degree (and don't forget to point out how dramatically you've improved over the past three years). Then they'll either lower their offer because they really want you, or tell you 'these are your offer conditions, take it or leave it' i.e. effectively reject you, but whichever it is, at least you'll know where you are.
    They definitely didn't mean to give you an offer which would be impossible for you to achieve, though, because that would be pointless.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    They definitely didn't mean to give you an offer which would be impossible for you to achieve, though, because that would be pointless.
    This is what I was thinking, they must have offered me a spot for some good reason. Thank you for the advice, I'll call and ask them about it on Monday then.
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    They're more likely to be lenient if you point it out now too, than them discovering it later in the application process when all the marginal places have been 'bagsied'.
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    yeh phone up they'll put you out of your misery with the worst possible news.
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    There may be some negotiation to be had. An extra credit independent study perhaps? Summer school? It may be that they're only looking at courses that make up your degree. I know at my college in the USA they let some people in their 'super senior year' throw out courses as they weren't connected to their major as it had taken them so long to declare one.
    Look at all the options and discuss them with your current school.
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    (Original post by giella)
    There may be some negotiation to be had. An extra credit independent study perhaps? Summer school? It may be that they're only looking at courses that make up your degree. I know at my college in the USA they let some people in their 'super senior year' throw out courses as they weren't connected to their major as it had taken them so long to declare one.
    Look at all the options and discuss them with your current school.
    Summer school?:lolwut: Isn't that something aimed at little kiddies, to help them get a sense of what undergraduate study involves? Or does the term mean something else in the US?
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Summer school?:lolwut: Isn't that something aimed at little kiddies, to help them get a sense of what undergraduate study involves? Or does the term mean something else in the US?
    There are summer schools for undergraduates as well. For example king's has a summer school on Greek and Latin for classics students.
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    (Original post by giella)
    There may be some negotiation to be had. An extra credit independent study perhaps? Summer school? It may be that they're only looking at courses that make up your degree. I know at my college in the USA they let some people in their 'super senior year' throw out courses as they weren't connected to their major as it had taken them so long to declare one.
    Look at all the options and discuss them with your current school.
    (Original post by hobnob)
    Summer school?:lolwut: Isn't that something aimed at little kiddies, to help them get a sense of what undergraduate study involves? Or does the term mean something else in the US?
    Summer classes aren't really a possibility, as I've already reached the maximum level of credits allowed. Also, I did do some math and I can reach the requirement if my entire first year isn't counted, but who knows if they would even consider that... Anyways, I'll try to see if any negotiation can be done, and really show how much my grades have improved to first-class over the last few years.
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    What course is this for? Is it the diploma in Economics?
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    (Original post by Ilustrius)
    What course is this for? Is it the diploma in Economics?
    No, for Business school.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Summer school?:lolwut: Isn't that something aimed at little kiddies, to help them get a sense of what undergraduate study involves? Or does the term mean something else in the US?
    I think it was fairly obvious I wasn't talking about something aimed at children, given I've been to college in the US and presumably knew what I was talking about.
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    So I called in and the program head said that I could attach a letter in April to the "selection committee" asking to only count my last 4 years on the grounds that in my first year I hadn't yet chosen a major, and so the poor grades didn't accurately reflect my academic skills.

    This seems really risky to me, as I've got an unconditional from a top continental Uni due in 2 days that I would have to reject on the basis of some arbitrary chance that this selection committee might ignore my first year...

    Really tough decision now... Would you gamble your own future in this situation?!
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    I would go with the sure thing personally, especially in such a tight time-frame. A 3.3 is usually considered the minimum standard to equate to a 2:1, so that is probably why they want this GPA.
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    (Original post by jnessenb)
    I would go with the sure thing personally, especially in such a tight time-frame. A 3.3 is usually considered the minimum standard to equate to a 2:1, so that is probably why they want this GPA.
    I will probably end up with a 3.2, and I'm not sure how strict UK Uni's usually are for conditionals in MSc programs.
 
 
 
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