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    hi there,

    ive got a job interview in a few days, and I would really really really love to get the job!

    Its basically going around primary schools and showing/teaching the kids some basic science experiments at after school clubs.

    For the interview ive been asked to think about how I would handle everyday situations with children in a teaching environment.

    So please can anyone advise me as to what type of everyday situations I should be thinking about? Can anyone with any experience with working with children
    help me please?

    thank you!
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    What job/ experience do you have that you can use??
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    How would you manage the behaviour and stop things from getting out of control? Particularly if you're around science equipment. I don't know what age you mean so if you're with the older primary age range, if there's any chemicals involved you need to think about how you'll keep them in control around these.

    That also means keeping them attentive when you're explaining tasks so that they listen to all the important parts and don't do something wrong which could be dangerous.

    I assume they won't be allowed too dangerous chemicals at primary age, but as a precaution...

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    (Original post by h4zelh)
    What job/ experience do you have that you can use??
    well ive done babysitting for 8 years, and supervised kids doing music exams, so I guess I can bring up some points from them. Im worried that in those situations especially babysitting, that the kids are too free, and that in a teaching environment the examples wont be appropriate =|
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    (Original post by Lazylisa)
    How would you manage the behaviour and stop things from getting out of control? Particularly if you're around science equipment. I don't know what age you mean so if you're with the older primary age range, if there's any chemicals involved you need to think about how you'll keep them in control around these.

    That also means keeping them attentive when you're explaining tasks so that they listen to all the important parts and don't do something wrong which could be dangerous.

    I assume they won't be allowed too dangerous chemicals at primary age, but as a precaution...


    thank you. they havnt actually told me what age - just primary school children! i think its for after school clubs that have all primary ages there, which makes it a bit harder! thats great what you said about the safety - they will love it if I say safety things! thank you!
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    Thinking about inclusion is really important. If it's mixed age you need to talk about how you would make your sessions accessible to younger children/lower ability whilst still engaging the older/more able children and stretching them. You need to make provision for SEN children too, so learning is accessible to every child. Even though it's not a formal lesson, if the school is paying to have you as a visitor they will expect the children to learn from it, and for that you need to think about this type of differentiation.
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    (Original post by Jen43)
    Thinking about inclusion is really important. If it's mixed age you need to talk about how you would make your sessions accessible to younger children/lower ability whilst still engaging the older/more able children and stretching them. You need to make provision for SEN children too, so learning is accessible to every child. Even though it's not a formal lesson, if the school is paying to have you as a visitor they will expect the children to learn from it, and for that you need to think about this type of differentiation.
    thank you thats really really useful!
 
 
 
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