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getting into rubbish universities/ courses watch

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    Especially with the upcoming fee rises, what'll be the point in people going to rubbish unis or on silly courses that are irrelevant to almost all parts of life?

    I know you should have insurances choices incase you don't get all As etc but if a course lets you on with less than Cs, is it worth doing. That course/ uni would probably have a bad reputation and when you did graduate you'd probably not be able to find a job.

    Should people be able to get onto a uni course if they didn't know/ understand less than about 60% of what they were taught at sixth form? IMO, no.

    I'm not saying uni should just be for the elite few that can afford it, but you should be clever to get in and not go on a rubbish course just for the sake of it. The places that take people with something like a C and D at A2 are probably rubbish and you'll hate it there . . .
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    It will be interesting to see how the number of applicants will vary for some of "lower down" courses. I think the new fees will put a lot of people off next year.
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    *sigh* Why are you so fussed about where others are going and how they'll be "wasting" £6000 + a year... ? It's not like you're doing it?

    (Original post by Nix-j-c)
    Should people be able to get onto a uni course if they didn't know/ understand less than about 60% of what they were taught at sixth form? IMO, no.

    The places that take people with something like a C and D at A2 are probably rubbish and you'll hate it there . . .
    People can perform "badly" at A level for various reasons, and this does NOT necessarily reflect their future performance at university level.

    Who are you to decide, what subject is relevant to someones life? THis may not be your view but some people may study just for, well, the sake of studying, and gaining knowledge and enjoyment from it etc.

    Finally, the bit in bold, :lolwut: ?! I could have applied to LSE, which by your logic would mean that i would love it there etc. but actually on the contrary I wouldn't. You have not visited every single uni, you cannot say, that everybody would hate it at a particular one, with lower entry standards...
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    (Original post by supernova92)
    *sigh* Why are you so fussed about where others are going and how they'll be "wasting" £6000 + a year... ? It's not like you're doing it?


    People can perform "badly" at A level for various reasons, and this does NOT necessarily reflect their future performance at university level.

    Who are you to decide, what subject is relevant to someones life? THis may not be your view but some people may study just for, well, the sake of studying, and gaining knowledge and enjoyment from it etc.

    Finally, the bit in bold, :lolwut: ?! I could have applied to LSE, which by your logic would mean that i would love it there etc. but actually on the contrary I wouldn't. You have not visited every single uni, you cannot say, that everybody would hate it at a particular one, with lower entry standards...
    I'm aware that some of the unis that ask for higher grades, some people may not like, but on the whole it'll probably be a better experience with a better quality of education and life in general.
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    (Original post by Nix-j-c)
    I'm aware that some of the unis that ask for higher grades, some people may not like, but on the whole it'll probably be a better experience with a better quality of education and life in general.
    Well I guess this is where we disagree. Many people face dilemas about what they should put as their firm because they love the course structure and the place etc, but it may require lower grades.
    Higher entry requirements doesn't equal better course content, better teaching, better environment, better buildings, better city, better people....

    I understand where you're coming from, but this is just your mentailty, that , the harder it is to get in, the better the uni is.
    I'll give you an example, Primary Education, a friend has applied to various unis (what you would call rubbish), her GCSES's range from A* -B and her As results were AABB, her favourite is Roehampton University, which is asking her for AAB. For this course it is quite high, however for other courses, the grade requirements are much much lower.
    She thinks the area is great.
    Would you class this as a "rubbish university" ?
    I don't understand how you can have all these assumptions as you're not even at university yet... (I do realise you're saying "probably" a lot, but still)
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    I said rubbish courses/ uni because some courses such as mine (marine biology) are popular so the requirements are high everywhere (minimum CCC) but some of those are at pretty rubbish universities, and I was generalising my point - I'm aware this isn't always the case and it's mainly up to personal opinions.
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    By your definition, the uni I go to is rubbish. If I met you IRL and told you where I went, you'll assume with all your ignorance that I go there because I couldn't get into any decent uni and that my grades are bad and that I'm too stupid for uni when that's not even the case.

    Besides there are a variety of factors which contribute to people performing badly in A-levels. It's unfair to write these people off based on a bunch of grades. In case you haven't realised, grades =/= intelligence. A-levels are all about memorising not intelligence.

    As far as 'rubbish courses' go - just because you are too close-minded to understand why someone would want to do such a degree, it doesn't mean it's crap. I have far more respect for people who study something they enjoy rather than something they're doing just to make themselves look good.

    You have absolutely no right to judge people based on your stupid generalisations. If you want to succeed in life, I suggest you get off your high horse.
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    Its upto you, if you want to really go and learn about a course you have passion for then there should be no stopping you.If your just going because you seem its a fromality then thats different
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    (Original post by Nix-j-c)
    The places that take people with something like a C and D at A2 are probably rubbish and you'll hate it there . . .
    That makes no sense and isn't true - I much prefer being at ARU than at LSE, mainly because I'm doing the course I want to here.
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    A-levels are not jsut about memorising stuff. especially in biology and chemsitry, which I do, to get more than about a D, you really have to understand it, and that's what the exams test you on, which is why they're so much harder than the fact-regurgitating GCSE exams.
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    (Original post by Nix-j-c)
    I said rubbish courses/ uni because some courses such as mine (marine biology) are popular so the requirements are high everywhere (minimum CCC) but some of those are at pretty rubbish universities, and I was generalising my point - I'm aware this isn't always the case and it's mainly up to personal opinions.
    :lol: What use is there for marine biology? I'm not entirely sure you can talk about rubbish courses...
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    The league-table mentality is causing a lot of damage. For example, Heriot-Watt isn't in most people's top 50, but it's top 5 in engineering, and some would say top 3. [B]There are 'rubbish unis' with patches of excellence, both in teaching and research.

    I've met graduates from brand-name unis who seem to have got nothing from the experience - they were just hogging a place that someone else could have used. And one of the brightest people I know did Video Production at Bournemouth. Don't make the mistake of assessing people by their grades, choices or careers - it's as big a mistake as judging by other externals like appearance or skin colour.
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    (Original post by Nix-j-c)
    A-levels are not jsut about memorising stuff. especially in biology and chemsitry, which I do, to get more than about a D, you really have to understand it, and that's what the exams test you on, which is why they're so much harder than the fact-regurgitating GCSE exams.
    I did those subjects. You need hard work but not intelligence (for Chemistry). Biology - you can just swallow the textbook and you'll get a good grade. It's really not as hard as you're making out for your own misplaced sense of self-worth.
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    (Original post by aeterno)
    ...Biology - you can just swallow the textbook and you'll get a good grade. It's really not as hard as you're making out for your own misplaced sense of self-worth.
    Well...in biology A2 it depends on the board and the option. I got bored to death with it because my teacher wasn't really a biologist and picked the 'easy' green/conservation/biodiversity paper. For our project, we wrote about a trip to the zoo. It was dire. A friend of mine at another college did the Synoptic paper, and it was a world of difference - physiology, genetics, metabolism.
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    (Original post by andromache458)
    Well...in biology A2 it depends on the board and the option. I got bored to death with it because my teacher wasn't really a biologist and picked the 'easy' green/conservation/biodiversity paper. For our project, we wrote about a trip to the zoo. It was dire. A friend of mine at another college did the Synoptic paper, and it was a world of difference - physiology, genetics, metabolism.
    Blimey! What exam board was that with? That's just taking the piss really
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    Hmm, I think that these "rubbish" unis and courses may start to shorten their courses down to a 2 year one to make the price point more appealing, there wouldn't be too big a difference in price that way and you would effectively get the same degree.
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    I think i would agree with nix. Its a big investment to make in order to get a degree that may well be near-useless and for quite a few subjects going to uni isn't the only option. Apprenticeships and academies are always available and should be seriously considered.
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    (Original post by jlebb)
    ...shorten their courses down to a 2 year one ...and you would effectively get the same degree.
    That's true, if the degree is just about a fixed amount of curriculum to get through. But if uni is supposed to be about having the time to read, think, argue, write about things that aren't necessarily your chosen subject, then a 2-year degree would end up being like going to technical college. We'll be turning out graduates who are 'trained' but uneducated.

    On the other hand, a professor at UCL has made an argument for making ALL degrees 2 year courses - with a 2 year honours/MA degree to follow for the best graduates.
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    (Original post by Jtking3000)
    I think i would agree with nix. ... Apprenticeships and academies are always available ....
    That's just the point, they're not always available. An apprenticeship in Germany is a three year professional training with a recognised diploma at the end - eg in plumbing. We have nothing like it in the UK.

    The students doing BA Rubbish Studies (whatever your definition - marine biology or hair and nails) might not be suitable for apprenticeships in any case.
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    Especially with all the damage we are doing to the environment and parts of the ocean in particular there is a growing industry for amrine research and conservation.

    I did a maths in engineering thing at sixth form and they asked us what we wanted to do and i said marine biology and they said that many of these companies employ marine biologists or similar people to assess any impacts of their work on the oceans and especially in my region, marine engineering is a rapidly growing industry.
 
 
 
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