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    Out of a degree in Computer Science, Electrical Engineering or possibly Mechanical/Automotive engineering would any of these put me in a decent standing for a career in the space industry? Does anyone have any information for following up a career in the space industry?

    Thanks in advance.
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    Any of them will do, it is up to you to decide which subject you like the most......plus you have forgotten Aeronautical/Aerospace Engineering.
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    You can do an undergraduate degree related to the subjects above and then follow up with a Masters in Space Systems Engineering or similar ie:

    http://www.mssl.ucl.ac.uk/teaching/msc_diplomas.html

    or

    http://www.isunet.edu/index.php/mss-msm

    The list goes on and on.....
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    Any of those I would of thought if you work hard. If you want to become an astronaut that's a whole different story.
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    (Original post by cybergrad)
    Any of them will do, it is up to you to decide which subject you like the most......plus you have forgotten Aeronautical/Aerospace Engineering.
    I cant physically do those degrees in my situation.
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    Forget them go for Aerospace Engineering.
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    Aeronautical Engineering
    Aerospace Materials
    Physics with Theoretical Physics
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    (Original post by Ewan)
    Any of those I would of thought if you work hard. If you want to become an astronaut that's a whole different story.
    Not an astronaut no, something space industry related yes. My physics department at college lately organised space master classes at the national space center and talks from leading space program engineers and Its something I could see myself enjoying.
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    (Original post by 2ndClass)
    Aeronautical Engineering
    Aerospace Materials
    Physics with Theoretical Physics

    (Original post by gozatron)
    Forget them go for Aerospace Engineering.


    I cant do aerospace as my engineering foundation year choices would only let me into electrical/mechanical/automotive/comp sci. One of my choices doesnt offer Aerospace, the other you need ABB for the foundation year in aeronautical.
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    Basically any of those would probably work. But if you want to be working for places like EADS Astrium and Surrey Satellites Tech Ltd, then an engineering degree would be more beneficial. Though of course you could attempt to apply for the apprenticeship. I know for a fact that EADS Astrium have a highly respected apprenticeship scheme. And I would assume that SSTL have one too.
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    Engineering, physics, even maths. You'll need further qualifications after I'm sure.
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    (Original post by Helsy)
    Basically any of those would probably work. But if you want to be working for places like EADS Astrium and Surrey Satellites Tech Ltd, then an engineering degree would be more beneficial. Though of course you could attempt to apply for the apprenticeship. I know for a fact that EADS Astrium have a highly respected apprenticeship scheme. And I would assume that SSTL have one too.
    Would it be hard to get into the industry without aerospace engineering?
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    Would it be hard to get into the industry without aerospace engineering?
    I wouldn't say it needed to be aerospace engineering, but some form of engineering I think would help. You see, you don't even have to make something fly, you could be in control of say the circuits inside... or tools for planetary rovers.
    Is there anything in particular you're interested in? (i.e. Satellites, rockets, rovers, astro suits etc)
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    (Original post by Helsy)
    I wouldn't say it needed to be aerospace engineering, but some form of engineering I think would help. You see, you don't even have to make something fly, you could be in control of say the circuits inside... or tools for planetary rovers.
    Is there anything in particular you're interested in? (i.e. Satellites, rockets, rovers, astro suits etc)
    Rockets/manned and unmanned vehicles, satellites and manned missions/unmanned missions. So basically something that would get me heavily involved if that makes sense I dont want to play such a small part you wouldnt notice.
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    Rockets/manned and unmanned vehicles, satellites and manned missions/unmanned missions. So basically something that would get me heavily involved if that makes sense I dont want to play such a small part you wouldnt notice.
    Thing is, there are so many people that work on these type things, that generally, people don't remember their names. But you sound like you want to be involved with the design aspect, with coming up with new ways to build the same thing into a smaller packet.

    I'm guessing based on what you said before about a foundation degree, that you have applied for that this year?? In which case, I would most likely say that the mechanical engineering is what you want to aim for. And then that you should aim to try and complete it with some form of undergraduate degree in engineering, as I think you've decided that you want to do Higher Education.

    But just another thing, if/when you arrive at a space industry career, remember that you will most likely have to start at the bottom. So you won't necessarily be doing full designs of a new planetary rover, but that you can still get there, it just takes time. All the people I've met who do that sort of thing are late 30s, 40s so that you won't have to wait too long to slowly go up the food chain.

    Sorry this was a bit long. If you want any more info, just ask.
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    (Original post by Helsy)
    Thing is, there are so many people that work on these type things, that generally, people don't remember their names. But you sound like you want to be involved with the design aspect, with coming up with new ways to build the same thing into a smaller packet.

    I'm guessing based on what you said before about a foundation degree, that you have applied for that this year?? In which case, I would most likely say that the mechanical engineering is what you want to aim for. And then that you should aim to try and complete it with some form of undergraduate degree in engineering, as I think you've decided that you want to do Higher Education.

    But just another thing, if/when you arrive at a space industry career, remember that you will most likely have to start at the bottom. So you won't necessarily be doing full designs of a new planetary rover, but that you can still get there, it just takes time. All the people I've met who do that sort of thing are late 30s, 40s so that you won't have to wait too long to slowly go up the food chain.

    Sorry this was a bit long. If you want any more info, just ask.


    Yeah I see what you mean. Degree wise its a toss up between Comp sci and doing bits of AI on optional modules or Electrical engineering at Loughborough. Or Mech eng/automotive eng at Sussex. I am quite likely to get in Loughborough.
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    Yeah I see what you mean. Degree wise its a toss up between Comp sci and doing bits of AI on optional modules or Electrical engineering at Loughborough. Or Mech eng/automotive eng at Sussex. I am quite likely to get in Loughborough.
    Well, I think both of those will give you great opportunities. I mean, worst some to worst you can do some form of Masters degree with a specific idea in mind. But I think you'll probably end up doing what you want to do. Plus, you can probably get some good work experience with engineering just by doing stuff through the Uni in the summer.
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    a degree in aeronautical engineering...then a follow up MSc in space mission analysis and design
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    (Original post by Helsy)
    Well, I think both of those will give you great opportunities. I mean, worst some to worst you can do some form of Masters degree with a specific idea in mind. But I think you'll probably end up doing what you want to do. Plus, you can probably get some good work experience with engineering just by doing stuff through the Uni in the summer.
    I should end up being put in the masters anyway, I only need 60% to be put on the masters and im not all that bad at maths/physics too.
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    I should end up being put in the masters anyway, I only need 60% to be put on the masters and i'm not all that bad at maths/physics too.
    Perfect! And I know that Loughborough is a brill Uni, I've got a mate there. But I don't know anything about Sussex.
 
 
 
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