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    hi guys, will be good meeting u in september, i did A Level Japanese and got an A so happy bout that! Im rly interested in learning lots of kanji, i think i know like 800 or so (this was for A-Levels) but i probs forgotten everything now so hoping to revise over lots of kanji and grammar points!
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    I got my 'Welcome to Sheffield you mature old hag' pack today but it wasn't the one I was looking forward to, boo.

    I may be able to change course to Japanese Studies with Spanish after speaking with admissions in the SOMLAL department but he is unsure whether it's a good idea to undertake learning 2 languages from scratch, what does everyone else think? I really want to do 2 languages and I self-taught myself to IGCSE A grade Japanese within 2 months, so it's not completely from scratch, but then again I have forgotten a lot of it.

    Surely it is possible, I mean, people do Modern Language degrees and learn 3 at once sometimes, right? Though, I guess that's German/French included and they require A Level for that.

    I reaaally wanna do it though. I know it would be a ton of work but I'm definitely up to the challenge.
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    (Original post by GuineaPrig)
    I got my 'Welcome to Sheffield you mature old hag' pack today but it wasn't the one I was looking forward to, boo.

    I may be able to change course to Japanese Studies with Spanish after speaking with admissions in the SOMLAL department but he is unsure whether it's a good idea to undertake learning 2 languages from scratch, what does everyone else think? I really want to do 2 languages and I self-taught myself to IGCSE A grade Japanese within 2 months, so it's not completely from scratch, but then again I have forgotten a lot of it.

    Surely it is possible, I mean, people do Modern Language degrees and learn 3 at once sometimes, right? Though, I guess that's German/French included and they require A Level for that.

    I reaaally wanna do it though. I know it would be a ton of work but I'm definitely up to the challenge.
    Personally, I think it would be quite hard and that you'd need a lot of motivation. You'd also never be able to fully focus your efforts on one language - meaning you wouldn't be as good at the end of the degree compared to if you'd just done one. It's a trade off though, because you'd have two languages.

    Did you do a language A-Level? I know that a lot of people who did Japanese having never done a language before found it a struggle to get their heads around basic grammatical concepts like tenses, and different word order.

    You'll miss out on all the Japanese non-language modules in 1st year - which would also be a shame.

    Really it just depends if you are good at languages or not - which only you can answer. If you've never done a romance language before or have no idea of your language ability, then I think it is kind of suicidal. Because you could very easily find that both Spanish and Japanese are a massive struggle and you'd end up drowning in vocab lists and grammar sheets. Or they could both go amazingly well and you could find them both a piece of cake, and be loving it. The people I know who do Japanese with Spanish do all love the Spanish side of their degree, but they all did it at A-Level and have lived in a Spanish country, so I don't know anyone you could ask who did both from scratch.
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    (Original post by Tommles)
    Personally, I think it would be quite hard and that you'd need a lot of motivation. You'd also never be able to fully focus your efforts on one language - meaning you wouldn't be as good at the end of the degree compared to if you'd just done one. It's a trade off though, because you'd have two languages.

    Did you do a language A-Level? I know that a lot of people who did Japanese having never done a language before found it a struggle to get their heads around basic grammatical concepts like tenses, and different word order.

    You'll miss out on all the Japanese non-language modules in 1st year - which would also be a shame.

    Really it just depends if you are good at languages or not - which only you can answer. If you've never done a romance language before or have no idea of your language ability, then I think it is kind of suicidal. Because you could very easily find that both Spanish and Japanese are a massive struggle and you'd end up drowning in vocab lists and grammar sheets. Or they could both go amazingly well and you could find them both a piece of cake, and be loving it. The people I know who do Japanese with Spanish do all love the Spanish side of their degree, but they all did it at A-Level and have lived in a Spanish country, so I don't know anyone you could ask who did both from scratch.
    Thanks for your reply!

    No I didn't do an A level language as I did an Access course - I left school when I was 12, so

    When I was in the process of leaving school however, I still had to do mock SATs despite the fact I didn't have any lessons for 3 months and I still managed to get the highest score in French out of the class, plus I love language learning in general and find it the most fun method of learning. I don't know whether the class just hated French or not, but I found it easy enough to retain.

    Japanese wouldn't be completely from scratch, I have forgotten a lot of it but I have been familiar with the language for around 8 years and am used to the characters, grammar and intonation etc., so I don't think I could get them mixed up as they're not similar like... Italian and Spanish, for example.

    I'd just love to be trilingual, I think I could do it but of course it's all conjecture as I have no idea how I'd actually do until I.. well, do it.
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    Perhaps doing modules at the Modern Languages Teaching Centre would be less suicidal? :V
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    (Original post by avila)
    Perhaps doing modules at the Modern Languages Teaching Centre would be less suicidal? :V
    I've thought about it because I wanted to do German initially, but on the year abroad you don't get any language modules so I'd probably forget it all, plus it's not as in-depth as doing a dual honours. I dunno, I reeeeeeeeally wanna do 2 languages thoroughly. I look at the modules for Japanese/Spanish and it's practically all language, and I just sit there drooling like, 'I want this ' because I find it so much fun that I find it goes in pretty easily and so it must be possible >.<! ... /endramble
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    (Original post by GuineaPrig)
    Thanks for your reply!

    No I didn't do an A level language as I did an Access course - I left school when I was 12, so

    When I was in the process of leaving school however, I still had to do mock SATs despite the fact I didn't have any lessons for 3 months and I still managed to get the highest score in French out of the class, plus I love language learning in general and find it the most fun method of learning. I don't know whether the class just hated French or not, but I found it easy enough to retain.

    Japanese wouldn't be completely from scratch, I have forgotten a lot of it but I have been familiar with the language for around 8 years and am used to the characters, grammar and intonation etc., so I don't think I could get them mixed up as they're not similar like... Italian and Spanish, for example.

    I'd just love to be trilingual, I think I could do it but of course it's all conjecture as I have no idea how I'd actually do until I.. well, do it.
    Pretty much. Really it's just totally up to you. If you really want to do, then do it! If you've never done languages at GCSE or A-Level then you really won't know if you can do them until you start. Spanish isn't too difficult a language anyway, something like Japanese and Chinese ab initio would be ultimate suicide.
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    (Original post by GuineaPrig)
    I self-taught myself to IGCSE A grade Japanese within 2 months, so it's not completely from scratch
    I don't like you > : (

    I took French for A level and got an A* so languages aren't particularly new to me. I used to hate them though, and got low B's and C's in French, but then I tried revising GCSE French by simply changing the language settings in my video games, looking up any words or tenses I didn't understand, and it worked extremely well. I rapidly improved and shocked my teachers by getting an A* at GCSE when my teacher had me down as useless.

    I'm hoping that once I'm at a stage where I can read Japanese competently, I'll improve at a similar rate. I'm not completely sure why I'm writing this, but I'd be interested to hear about other people's experiences with languages.
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    (Original post by RedTide)
    I don't like you > : (

    I took French for A level and got an A* so languages aren't particularly new to me. I used to hate them though, and got low B's and C's in French, but then I tried revising GCSE French by simply changing the language settings in my video games, looking up any words or tenses I didn't understand, and it worked extremely well. I rapidly improved and shocked my teachers by getting an A* at GCSE when my teacher had me down as useless.

    I'm hoping that once I'm at a stage where I can read Japanese competently, I'll improve at a similar rate. I'm not completely sure why I'm writing this, but I'd be interested to hear about other people's experiences with languages.
    Haha, I do that too - changing language settings on movies and games etc. It really does help, especially with listening when it's audio.

    Currently watching 1-2 episodes of Japanese drama per day (http://dramacrazy.net if anyone's interested) to keep my listening up and going over kana occasionally.

    I think I'm gonna go for it and try Japanese/Spanish if they'll let me. I can always switch back to single honours if it's too tricky. I'll take the word of this website that says Spanish is * difficulty and Japanese is ***** difficulty and hope that it's true.
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    (Original post by GuineaPrig)
    Spanish is * difficulty and Japanese is ***** difficulty
    Get that out of your head. :V

    Spanish is * difficulty
    Japanese is also * difficulty

    If you think Japanese is hard, it will be hard.

    In the end, it's all down to your individual effort. Everything from grammar to kanji comes down to effort. None of it is five-star difficult; otherwise there wouldn't be over 150,000,000 people who speak it.

    That website should be saying "Spanish is * effort and Japanese is ***** effort"

    People are going to neg me now because they became fluent in Spamish in one month but couldn't do the same in Japanese. The reason is simply that there is so much more to learn in order to master Japanese. That, and perhaps the fact Japanese is not a Neo-Latin language so it feels "weird" to our western brains. But it's not due to difficulty. :x
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    (Original post by avila)
    Get that out of your head. :V

    Spanish is * difficulty
    Japanese is also * difficulty

    If you think Japanese is hard, it will be hard.

    In the end, it's all down to your individual effort. Everything from grammar to kanji comes down to effort. None of it is five-star difficult; otherwise there wouldn't be over 150,000,000 people who speak it.

    That website should be saying "Spanish is * effort and Japanese is ***** effort"

    People are going to neg me now because they became fluent in Spamish in one month but couldn't do the same in Japanese. The reason is simply that there is so much more to learn in order to master Japanese. That, and perhaps the fact Japanese is not a Neo-Latin language so it feels "weird" to our western brains. But it's not due to difficulty. :x
    I agree. I don't find Japanese that difficult because I enjoy it so much. But it is certainly all down to effort in the end and I'm going to put my all into it!
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    So how did you get up to A grade IGCSE so fast? Did you take classes or did you just self study? What kind of materials did you use? Sorry for the barrage of questions, I'd just like to be as prepared as possible for the start of term.
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    (Original post by RedTide)
    I'd just like to be as prepared as possible for the start of term.
    Do keep in mind that zero knowledge is assumed and Hugo Dobson said during the June open day those without prior knowledge start off better. Assuming you know hiragana and katakana, you're all set. :x
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    (Original post by RedTide)
    So how did you get up to A grade IGCSE so fast? Did you take classes or did you just self study? What kind of materials did you use? Sorry for the barrage of questions, I'd just like to be as prepared as possible for the start of term.
    This is a really useful grammar guide. If you wanted something to do perhaps you could go through the Basic Grammar section to familiarise yourself with Japanese word order, what particles are etc. http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar

    (Actually, if you went through that entire guide I reckon you'd have covered all of first year's grammar and then some. But I wouldn't recommend doing that.)

    Really, as long as you know your kana perfectly then you'll be completely prepared. You really won't be at a disadvantage for not having done it before - you don't get any extra marks for putting stuff in exams/essays/homeworks that hasn't been covered in class.
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    (Original post by avila)
    Get that out of your head. :V

    Spanish is * difficulty
    Japanese is also * difficulty

    That website should be saying "Spanish is * effort and Japanese is ***** effort"
    Really that means the same thing, difficulty is defined as 'requiring a lot of effort to accomplish' therefore how difficult a language is is determined by how much time or effort it requires to master

    "Of the 63 languages analyzed, the five most difficult languages to reach proficiency in speaking and proficiency in reading (for native English speakers who already know other languages), requiring 88 weeks,[clarification needed] are Arabic, Cantonese, Mandarin, Japanese, and Korean. The Foreign Service Institute notes that Japanese is typically more difficult to learn than other languages in this group."
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Difficu...first_language)

    But ultimately, you are right in saying it will just require more effort than Spanish.
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    So do u think i could do korean from scratch since i already did japanese at a-level and i heard they have similar grammatical structures.
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    (Original post by Im_a_cyborg)
    Really that means the same thing, difficulty is defined as 'requiring a lot of effort to accomplish' therefore how difficult a language is is determined by how much time or effort it requires to master

    "Of the 63 languages analyzed, the five most difficult languages to reach proficiency in speaking and proficiency in reading (for native English speakers who already know other languages), requiring 88 weeks,[clarification needed] are Arabic, Cantonese, Mandarin, Japanese, and Korean. The Foreign Service Institute notes that Japanese is typically more difficult to learn than other languages in this group."
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Difficu...first_language)

    But ultimately, you are right in saying it will just require more effort than Spanish.
    Hi btw i think ur blog's japanese is rly good, even tho ive only done a-level i still understand most of it, im so motivated now to give japanese my all come september!!
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    (Original post by Narutofan88)
    Hi btw i think ur blog's japanese is rly good, even tho ive only done a-level i still understand most of it, im so motivated now to give japanese my all come september!!
    Thanks, although it is full of mistakes, i just use it as composition practice XD
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    (Original post by Narutofan88)
    So do u think i could do korean from scratch since i already did japanese at a-level and i heard they have similar grammatical structures.
    I have no idea what Korean is like as a language. But I do know that you are strongly discouraged from taking another East Asian language - you'd have to go talk to the module co-ordinator about it - but since you have done A-Level Japanese they might let you. I know someone last year was allowed to do Chinese (but they later dropped out of the uni).

    I don't believe there is a Korean for non-specialists module, so you'd be in the same classes as people doing BA Korean Studies, I think. So you'd have a very heavy workload.

    Personally I wouldn't, people who want to do some Korean tend to do it in 2nd year or 4th year, once they have got a good grounding in Japanese.
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    I know I probably shouldn't do any more Japanese until the start of term, but oh god I love me some grammar. I don't even know why.

    Also, it just dawned on me that we've probably all been in the same rooms, listening to the same speeches. Woahhhh, mind blown.
 
 
 
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