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    What it all comes down to is - do the Medical schools really care? No, they know that by introducing the UKCAT or so they'll potentially be loosing better doctors than those they accept. But what it does is makes it easier to chuck away about 1000 applicants as an excuse.

    The system is highly complex for admissions atm, imagine having 2.5k+ kids with all the minimum grades. You think they want to interview all? They have to chuck away some so that the system can work.
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    I'm sorry, but this is utter speculation. Ok, so the ukcat is a bit rubbish, but ultimately, if you are the right person for a medical career and you work your socks off, you'll get in. The trick is to check entry requirements and apply to those that favour your strengths eg. high ukcat, number of A*s at GCSE.
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    [QUOTE=morecambebay;30424303]I dont want to be a ****, but have you seen that bloke on junior doctors when he is running to a crash call? somebody is going to die because of his food habbit./QUOTE]

    They say running is a bad idea in the first place - better to walk and arrive composed and not out of breath. I think he is one of the first i'd call compared to the other ones on that program!
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    (Original post by Beska)
    I think it's more like 86% - stop exaggerating.
    I swear you've posted in nearly every medical related thread. :eek:
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    (Original post by KCosmo)
    Just a slight adjustment on this idea, instead of a fight to the death, a fight to near death and the loser gets a place for dentistry

    Just to add my 10 pence in, I think the overall system is fair enough (coming from someone with 4 rejections!), obviously as with everything there's an element of luck, but I do hate that they use the UKCAT! I understand that they need some sort of test but the UKCAT is no good for a multitude of reasons.

    An alternative is perhaps something like what Manchester try to do for dentistry. The applicants are given a big textbook full of dentistry information and told that questions were going to be asked on it at interview. Obviously this is a bit of pot luck depending on what question you get asked/what you learned.

    I would suggest that instead of the UKCAT, we have a test where one month before the test they release a set of learning outcomes on a topic that is covered in the medical course 1.(or perhaps a slightly simplified version?) and/or 2. (a selection of simple aspects from a variety of topics?) It would be similar to tests that are done in the medical course, and so completely relevant. Then we all sit the test on the same day, (like they do with the BMAT?). This way everyone has an equal chance. Some could argue that "their mate got an unfair advantage because their mate has read up on stuff that's in the medicine course before the month started", but really, if you're encouraging people to learn parts of the medicine course before applying it can only be a good thing. Perhaps some people would change their choice of course once they see what kind of stuff they'll actually be doing, instead of bloody shapes and codes

    But it's only off of the top of my head, there's probably some huge hole in this theory
    The hole I can see is that most applicants are already really busy with whatever courses they're doing. Medicine applications, interview prep, etc already take a long time and eat into your study/revision time - imagine having to learn a whole lot of extra information on top of that.

    In terms of learning things, I think most applicants do spend a lot of time reading/learning about public health issues, NHS reform, how the medical courses are structured etc, which are already tested at interview. This is far better for distinguishing candidates who are generally interested and are able to independently look things up than a system where candidates would just have to memorise a set syllabus - most applicants, who will all have good grades, have had plenty of practise at doing that already.
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    (Original post by shutter)
    I swear you've posted in nearly every medical related thread. :eek:
    Funny that!
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    (Original post by morecambebay)
    I dont want to be a ****, but have you seen that bloke on junior doctors when he is running to a crash call? somebody is going to die because of his food habbit.
    They say running is a bad idea in the first place - better to walk and arrive composed and not out of breath. I think he is one of the first i'd call compared to the other ones on that program!
    Even walking I bet that guy would be out of breath. It once showed a clip of him covered in sweat and then said "(whatever his name is) has just started his night shift."
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    At the end of the day a lot of thinks are flawed and do come down to luck as well. But if you put enough hard work in you should stand a good chance. It's all about playing the "game" properly, and saying/knowing what the admissions wants to hear.
    Just about everyone who I know put a lot of effort in their applications, read a lot on the nhs and so on.. got a place. Those that didn't, didn't get a place. Simple really.

    Last year I myself did hardly any work, and the consequence was I got rejected, not done to look-it was my fault. This year I put a lot of effort in, as a result got some offer.
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    I get that the ukcat is evil but realistically everyone applying for ukcat medical schools sits the same exam, no one can really revise for it so it's always just down to performance on the day and every applicant is in the same situation as they have to take that test (ignoring school support etc).
    If an applicant doesn't want to sit the ukcat because it's unfair and somehow bias against them and only them then there is the bmat and other places such as liverpool which consider neither.
    Interviews are needed because they're one of the few things that stop applicants lying about work experience etc.
    Realistically having all universities look for the same things in applicants would decease chance
    because the best applicants would always end up with 4 offers whereas now the universities look for different things so people overall have better chances.
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    Maybe not so much 87%, but a lot of it is based on luck these days.
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    (Original post by modem)
    ps,intws,ukcat-infact they didnt change this because they didnt have enough money to do so.
    I want to start a petition of complaint to the govt to regulate this stupid system and i think it should BE CHANGED IN THE 21ST CENTURY WE LIVE IN.
    Did you loose at the game?

    (Original post by modem)
    make it more fair somehow?scrap the ukcat and invest in a fairer test
    If you're going to have admissions tests, the UKCAT is not far off as good as can be done. Shame you can't do it, eh?
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    Oh c'mon how is it luck? Its just a series of hoops you have to jump through and if you jump through them well enough you WILL get an offer its as simple as that.

    Like I mean getting into medical school isn't even that hard, the average medical applicant has a 40% chance of getting in on their first attempt. In this market where getting onto a graduate scheme you are competing with over 500,000 graduates for about 45,000 graduate schemes (I accept there is a lot more graduate jobs than graduate schemes, but honestly if you want to go anywhere in life a graduate scheme is where you need to be.)

    To be honest i would take my chances trying to get into medical school any day, and when you graduate 98% end up with a job with some of the best prospects in the world. Medical Admissions is relatively easy in this current climate.
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    (Original post by Gowrav)
    At the end of the day a lot of thinks are flawed and do come down to luck as well. But if you put enough hard work in you should stand a good chance. It's all about playing the "game" properly, and saying/knowing what the admissions wants to hear.
    Just about everyone who I know put a lot of effort in their applications, read a lot on the nhs and so on.. got a place. Those that didn't, didn't get a place. Simple really.

    Last year I myself did hardly any work, and the consequence was I got rejected, not done to look-it was my fault. This year I put a lot of effort in, as a result got some offer.
    Life does not work like that. Sometimes those that work really hard still get rejections.

    Also, those that supposedly work hard may have gotten a lot of support in their application, help with the ukcat, finding work experience, a health care job, etc.

    It is not as simple as just working hard. That is a stupid way of looking at it.
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    I'm assuming you didn't get in, then.
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    (Original post by shaz111)
    Oh c'mon how is it luck? Its just a series of hoops you have to jump through and if you jump through them well enough you WILL get an offer its as simple as that.

    Like I mean getting into medical school isn't even that hard, the average medical applicant has a 40% chance of getting in on their first attempt. In this market where getting onto a graduate scheme you are competing with over 500,000 graduates for about 45,000 graduate schemes (I accept there is a lot more graduate jobs than graduate schemes, but honestly if you want to go anywhere in life a graduate scheme is where you need to be.)

    To be honest i would take my chances trying to get into medical school any day, and when you graduate 98% end up with a job with some of the best prospects in the world. Medical Admissions is relatively easy in this current climate.
    I will not waste my time with what you have just said.
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    (Original post by firestar101)
    Life does not work like that. Sometimes those that work really hard still get rejections.

    Also, those that supposedly work hard may have gotten a lot of support in their application, help with the ukcat, finding work experience, a health care job, etc.

    It is not as simple as just working hard. That is a stupid way of looking at it.
    Whilst you're right, none of that is unique to medicine.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    If you're going to have admissions tests, the UKCAT is not far off as good as can be done. Shame you can't do it, eh?
    Is the bar for a 'good admissions test' ridiculously low or something?
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    Does anyone know the actual statistic of school leavers who receive an offer for medicine? Im sure it was like 45% or something, but I cant find that anywhere
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    (Original post by firestar101)
    Life does not work like that. Sometimes those that work really hard still get rejections.

    Also, those that supposedly work hard may have gotten a lot of support in their application, help with the ukcat, finding work experience, a health care job, etc.

    It is not as simple as just working hard. That is a stupid way of looking at it.
    Obviously its not that simple, but working hard WILL get you somewhere in life. You have to work hard in all areas, not just one. This obviously doesn't guarantee you an offer, but you should stand a very good chance. That being said more and more people are releasing this and therefore it is becoming harder to get into medicine.
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    (Original post by planetconwy1)
    Does anyone know the actual statistic of school leavers who receive an offer for medicine? Im sure it was like 45% or something, but I cant find that anywhere
    The % rejected is like 50-60% so it'd make sense for the those accepted to be 40-50%!
 
 
 
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