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Medicine 2012...(hopeful entrants) !! watch

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    (Original post by liviaaa)
    Why do you all want to do medicine?
    I started wanting to do medicine when my mum got pregnant with my brother (that was only 3 and a half years ago). Following the development of life really fascinated me, and then my brother was always in and out of hospital (he had really bad eczema on his face since birth and got infections from them, it scary watching a tiny thing only a few weeks old with pus like stuff oozing out all over his face) so I was in and out of hospital a lot too and I found that I'd quite like the responsibilities and being able to treat people like a doctor. That's one big reason and I don't want to list all the others here now because it'll turn into a big essay.
    Sorry if all that sounds quite corny.
    Do you have any particular reasons?
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    (Original post by Harbour Seal)
    Because I get to be elbow deep in someone's body, and it was either this or forging a career as the Glasgow Ripper.
    *sigh* neg rep for a joke? Seriously?

    Get a grip.
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    (Original post by Harbour Seal)
    Because I get to be elbow deep in someone's body, and it was either this or forging a career as the Glasgow Ripper.
    Either your incision is in the wrong place, or the patient is huge for you to be elbow deep.....
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    (Original post by TooSexyForMyStethoscope)
    Either your incision is in the wrong place, or the patient is huge for you to be elbow deep.....
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    (Original post by Harbour Seal)
    Maybe it's best that I don't know
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    (Original post by TooSexyForMyStethoscope)
    Maybe it's best that I don't know
    Probably.

    Seriously though. I'm not a nutter. I want to be a doctor because I like people. I think we're interesting. No other real reason than that really.
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    Don't do it folks!! Don't apply for medicine....it's far too stressful!!

    Seriously, good luck to everyone who's applying for next year. If I can give you one piece of advice it's this: STUDY STUDY STUDY for the UKCAT. The online advice from Pearson Vue and advice from Universities is b****cks....it will make a difference! You can't learn anything that will help you per se, but you can train your mind to think in the required manner, especially for Abstract Reasoning. I would recommend the following book, it REALLY helped me out!

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/into-Medical.../dp/1905812094

    Good luck again!
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    (Original post by Harbour Seal)
    Probably.

    Seriously though. I'm not a nutter. I want to be a doctor because I like people. I think we're interesting. No other real reason than that really.
    I gathered that you weren't that strange

    People are always good
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    Already found it in my school library, it will be well read by the summer . I just noticed the personal statement guide also written by icsmedical, anyone know if it's any good?
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    (Original post by TooSexyForMyStethoscope)
    I gathered that you weren't that strange

    People are always good
    Not good. Just odd.

    Mr Seal is an anthropologist :rolleyes: I am just far more practical in my approach to life, that's all.
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    (Original post by aqua05)
    Heyy
    Thanks for the Good Luck.. we all need it !
    What were your GCSE grades, AS & A2 grades ? If you dont mind could you please PM me your personal statement.. really need help on how to go about it.
    Thankss Bubbles :P
    Hey
    I got 11A*s for GCSE, and 6As for AS (maths, chem bio, phys n history). and predicted 5A*s (never ever gonna happen!!) :P
    Yeah, sure, will do
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    (Original post by Normandy114)
    Already found it in my school library, it will be well read by the summer . I just noticed the personal statement guide also written by icsmedical, anyone know if it's any good?
    It is very good, so long as one keeps in mind that the sample personal statements aren't templates, and to make sure not to accidentally be too influenced by them. But you already knew that, as you have your own unique reason for choosing medicine, and experiences, was just saying in case.
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    Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Further Maths
    Maths-A*
    AS RE-A

    Dunno where to apply though yet to be honest.
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    (Original post by cz100)
    Thanks I did get 1 day in radiography and a few days with my GP and just started volunteering in paediatrics. I got a bit scared of the interviews Queens are going to use, like multiple scenarios and things.
    Hi there

    For your work experience, did you approach the ward/department directly, or did you go through the hospital voluntary services people? The day you spent in radiography must have been really good experience.
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    (Original post by Cityshy)
    It is very good, so long as one keeps in mind that the sample personal statements aren't templates, and to make sure not to accidentally be too influenced by them. But you already knew that, as you have your own unique reason for choosing medicine, and experiences, was just saying in case.
    Certainly sounds good, and yes obviously not going to copy their examples. The Amazon reviews for it are an average of 4.9/5 so it seems well recommended! Unfortunately school library only has the ukcat/interview ones by icsmedical, so may have to buy this one myself.
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    (Original post by Normandy114)
    Already found it in my school library, it will be well read by the summer . I just noticed the personal statement guide also written by icsmedical, anyone know if it's any good?
    Ah the benefits of being at school....some of us had to buy these books!!

    Personally I didn't find the personal statement book to be of any great use, others may disagree but I was always fairly confident when it came to writing my PS and preferred it to be something that portrayed who I am rather than a samey, generic sounding one.... As an example the book tells you to avoid using humour: I decided to completely ignore this advice and got 4 interviews. Whether that was because of, or despite the humour I don't know, but it seemed to work!

    The "Medical School Interviews" book is really quite helpful however (assuming/hoping you get that far!), but again be careful to use it as a guideline rather than remembering the responses verbatim- you're answers should reflect who you are and have at least an element of truth in them!
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    (Original post by dominiqueblack)
    Haha yeah
    Just want to help people because I'm one of the very few people who have applied to medicine from my school in a good few years and they didn't help me at all. I went into the whole process totally blind and I didn't even know what the UKCAT was until my dad happened to find out about it! Managed to learn alot through applying !

    I'm not saying you need to do all this but this is what I did, and it worked!

    I got unconditionals for Edinburgh and Dundee. And a conditional for Glasgow (BB Advanced Higher, C Higher) and I withdrew from St.Andrew's as it was my last choice.

    I got 722 in UKCAT.
    6 As at Scottish Higher; Biology, English, Maths, French, Chemistry and Geography.

    Advice I'd give would be:
    Get in contact with your local NHS Trust or any doctor you know and try to get work experience. I wrote out 50 letters to GPs and hospital departments asking for work experience with my name, my age, why I was looking for work experience, what I hoped to learn etc. Try your best to get experience in at least 2 different environments, although don't worry too much if you don't. Just remember to write and talk about what you learned from the experience (e.g I learned that there was alot more paperwork involved than I thought, but I said that this still would not put me off or I said that I learned that teamwork was absolutely essential in hospital and GP work, and everyone uses their best skill to provide the best possible care for patients.) Don't feel bad if you can't get much experience, just talk about your enthusiasm for what you did do and see and what you learned. The unis know that its difficult to find work experience!

    Do voluntary work for as long as possible before you apply in any kind of environment but a nursing home/elderly group/hospice/youth group would be great. I had volunteered at an equestrian centre for four years and although its not medically related it showed dedication and I used it to say I had increased my communication skills in dealing with people and people who have difficulties communicating (I worked with Riding for the Disabled Association). I also mentioned in my personal statement that I had applied to volunteer in a hospice however Disclosure Scotland had not come through. However, at interviews, I spoke about my experience there and how it had helped me learn to cope with my emotions.

    Try to apply strategically. Look into which unis put most importance on which factors (UKCAT, work experience, non-academics etc.) look at your strong points and apply accordingly. Applying to medicine is as much strategic as it is luck and grades etc.

    Do as much at school as you can. Get involved in any projects, fundraising, head girl etc. And use this in your personal statement to show what you learned. Everything in applying for medicine is what you gained and learned, not what you did! (e.g I was in the yearbook committee, it developed my teamworking skills and helped me to express my opinions more clearly) Also try to make sure you have some hobbies to write about. They like to know that you're a well rounded person!

    I'd definitely advise buying the ISC books for the UKCAT test and Medicine Interviews. The Medicine Interviews book gives you lots of questions to look at and you can prepare some things in advance (Why do you want to do Medicine? Why that uni? What do you know about PBL? Modernising Medical Careers? Ethical Questions etc.) They cost quite a bit but definitely worth it! So save up and get them. The UKCAT book questions are so much harder than the actual test but they really prepare you well seen as if you do a selection of the questions, you've done wayy more that is in the test.

    Make sure you dress appropriately for any interviews, a smart suit or a pair of nice trousers and a blouse are fine.

    Try to do a mock interview with a family member or teacher to be more prepared.

    Put BBC Health news (http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/news) as your internet homepage. I'd advise picking a condition (I chose Alzheimers as my gran has it and I wrote about it in my personal statement) and researching it in depth to be able to speak about it in detail at interview. Don't ignore everything else though, look at any news as all interviews asked me if I had looked into the news about medicine.

    Keep a notebook and write out anything you think of. (e.g answers to common questions, details or medical news)

    Most important! Be yourself, especially at interview! And don't give up! I was lucky enough to get in first time round. But many amazing applicants are rejected and need to re-apply. If it happens, take a gap year, get more work experience, find a job and don't worry, it'll happen!

    Good Luck and if you need any more advice, just ask!
    This is great help and thank you veryy much. =)
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    I am also a hopefull medicine 2012 applicant

    Ermm , i do chemistry , biology , maths , english literature , and critical thinking (by forcee ! )
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    (Original post by bryan.connell)
    Ah the benefits of being at school....some of us had to buy these books!!

    Personally I didn't find the personal statement book to be of any great use, others may disagree but I was always fairly confident when it came to writing my PS and preferred it to be something that portrayed who I am rather than a samey, generic sounding one.... As an example the book tells you to avoid using humour: I decided to completely ignore this advice and got 4 interviews. Whether that was because of, or despite the humour I don't know, but it seemed to work!

    The "Medical School Interviews" book is really quite helpful however (assuming/hoping you get that far!), but again be careful to use it as a guideline rather than remembering the responses verbatim- you're answers should reflect who you are and have at least an element of truth in them!
    Very true, a lecturer I heard a week ago advised strongly against humour as whether or not it gets accepted can hinge upon their sense of humor versus yours. What was the humour btw?
    Also on my work experience I shadowed some F1s and when the workload died down they decided to spend the next couple of hours giving me most of the interview questions given to the doctors on the ward at the time. It was damn difficult at the time but will be useful when the interviews come around (assuming I get one )
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    (Original post by Count Stefular)
    Oh I love it! It's amazing. But honestly? I think i'd like anywhere, all the places I applied I would have been happy to go to. I really would start trying to get places on open days early, they run out so quickly. Just blag it as a sickie if your school gives you grief, if you care enough about your uni, you're gonna care enough to catch up. Try to get a med specific one too, much more helpful.
    see, i think i'd be happy anywhere as long as i did medicine, but i just love kings! i mean, it wouldnt be the end of the world if i didnt get in, but it would be nice accomodation is a bit iffy though, i dont fancy living at home during uni.

    how many open days did you go to? i want to try and go to an open day for every uni i apply to, but some might be in scotland and its kinda expensive to get up there :/
 
 
 
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