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    (Original post by dr coxx and JD)
    good! see you get tours before hand

    tbh, i'm fighting to get any sort of work experience or voluntary i can=/ so difficult
    oh i forgot to say, my interview was at 9 am :P
    and i suggest St john ambulance, because they'll never turn you down, and you have to wait like 8 weeks for CRB + waiting for the next available training day. then it seems like youve done more
    and i think many a care home probably wont turn you down if you insist that your only a volunteer and such. although i have been...
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    (Original post by Limesasquatch)
    yeah, and i feel like bragging, my dentist knew an interviewer there and he was going to give me a place if i didnt have such sh*tty GCSE grades :cool:
    phew, that makes me feel a bit better..
    lol, b'ham and their gcse's eh...

    some people like me only got to do NINE, i was forced to do OCR nationals .... on top!

    either way, my a/s exams have gone morbid...mixed
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    (Original post by Limesasquatch)
    oh i forgot to say, my interview was at 9 am :P
    and i suggest St john ambulance, because they'll never turn you down, and you have to wait like 8 weeks for CRB + waiting for the next available training day. then it seems like youve done more
    and i think many a care home probably wont turn you down if you insist that your only a volunteer and such. although i have been...
    CRB takes EIGHT weeks?

    =/ i heard it took a lot less
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    (Original post by dr coxx and JD)
    CRB takes EIGHT weeks?

    =/ i heard it took a lot less
    yeah only like 3-4 weeks usually. But i started in early may, and i'm attending a training say on saturday, and then i have to wait some more after that and do some 'watching' before i become a st john ambulancer (?)
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    (Original post by Limesasquatch)
    yeah only like 3-4 weeks usually. But i started in early may, and i'm attending a training say on saturday, and then i have to wait some more after that and do some 'watching' before i become a st john ambulancer (?)

    I'm going mental now!

    going to get a crb check and start submitting my applications starting tomorrow lol

    =/ keep getting rejected

    brb
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    (Original post by dr coxx and JD)
    I'm going mental now!

    going to get a crb check and start submitting my applications starting tomorrow lol

    =/ keep getting rejected

    brb
    well st john ambulance get the CRB check done for you, for FREE!!
    and most other employers will want their own.
    i managed to blag mine which was a bout 3 weeks old from the st john ambulance for some work at a disabled school.
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    (Original post by dr coxx and JD)
    you don't have to go to the open day

    i heard you get a tour before?

    but always best to research the university they surely can't expect peopel to visit 10 open days

    ukcat or exam results could change my ENTIRE look on the uni's
    The very first question I was asked at my Liverpool interview was, "Have you been to Liverpool before?" I just replied with an honest "no" and they just burst out laughing

    I still managed to get the offer

    Spoiler:
    Show
    To repeat what I wrote in the medicine applicants profiles thread,

    It sounds stupid, but don't be afraid to apply to medical schools that you haven't been to visit. Last year, I went to three open days (my school imposed a limit :rolleyes:) and then went on to apply to all three of them. On reflection, I think I was afraid to apply to other medical schools because I thought I'd be at some disadvantage just because I hadn't been to listen to their welcome talks and look around. With plenty of other resources available, such as prospectuses, uni websites, union view, unistats (to compare student satisfaction ratings), this site (to compare course content and structure), it isn't necessary to go to the open day for every single one of your choices. Furthermore, I found that I was wowed by some of the open days, but realistically I had better odds of getting into other medical schools. So don't be blinded.
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    (Original post by EternalDoom)
    I'm thinking: Cambridge, King's, Queen Mary's, UCL, and Imperial. Planning on going to all the open days...
    Well Cambridge aren't really too bothered about the BMAT. You should be fine as long as you get over half marks in all sections. UCL I don't know about but I believe Imperial look at candidates in order of BMAT scores. But generally, over half marks and you stand a decent chance of interview again. Also, UCL seem to be the only one to ask about the essay question.
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    (Original post by italienmoose)
    Well Cambridge aren't really too bothered about the BMAT. You should be fine as long as you get over half marks in all sections. UCL I don't know about but I believe Imperial look at candidates in order of BMAT scores. But generally, over half marks and you stand a decent chance of interview again. Also, UCL seem to be the only one to ask about the essay question.
    not applying to cambridge, as i can not really dicern what they look for in an applicant. either way, i know it's more science based interview.

    =) ^_^ will apply for one bmat uni. Any tips on the bmat? you did amazingly well here.

    my choice would probably be imperial college

    it's a hit and miss, depending on the bmat, but i just want to focus on getting the cut-off =/
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    "what was the approximate average distance of a single journey stage in 2002? (give your anwer to the nearest 0.5 miles)

    Well, basically, they want the average distance of a single journey stage.

    so basically, it's the distance travelled, per stage.

    so distance / stage

    total distance travelled/total stages?

    ^^ the book tells us that it is in WEEKS.
    so...6981 x 16,886 gives you the total distance

    divide that by the total stages gives you the answer?

    WRONG =/?!

    well, tbh, i knew it was distance over stages after getting a lot of help

    but stages = 349,227
    individuals = 16, 886

    individuals per stage = stage / individual

    =349,000 /17,000 = around 20?

    so the distance travelled per person per week is the distance travelled in 2002, divided by 52 weeks
    6981/52 =

    7000/52?

    well, i need to learn how to do approximates! or i'll get this wrong

    130/20 = 6.3? woops answer = 6.5

    yep, i fall when i need to make approximates
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    Now...for the critical thinking part

    if they say, what are the underlying assumptions in this text, well it is rather simple in definition. An assumption is an unstated argument, that needs to be true for the proposed argument to work. If you reverse an assumption, the arguement no longer works

    ...it's spotting these assumptions that is fairly difficult.

    For example:

    David Cameron is a tory party Mp, therefore he does not really care about low-income families, because he scrapped and introduced tuition fee's, and many other things, making it difficult for low income familis.

    now...what is the assumption in this? Scrapping tuition fee's means he does not care for low income families.
    Low-income families are somehow also, negatively effected by these cuts?

    Or would they be negatively effected? Really, if the argument is as broad as stating that he doesn't really care, can this mean the proposals will have negative effects? Perhaps?

    Perhaps these proposal will only effect low income families, and that there are no means which are placed to help such students?
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    (Original post by BMAT)
    not applying to cambridge, as i can not really dicern what they look for in an applicant. either way, i know it's more science based interview.

    =) ^_^ will apply for one bmat uni. Any tips on the bmat? you did amazingly well here.

    my choice would probably be imperial college

    it's a hit and miss, depending on the bmat, but i just want to focus on getting the cut-off =/
    There aren't really tips for the BMAT. It's all multiple choice or very short answer questions except the essay. I just went through the official book of questions, which is very short and not particularly useful. You can't really prepare for the critical thinking section as far as I'm concerned, and the science is limited to GCSE stuff. So basically, the first section you'll get whatever you get, and hopefully you can still remember a reasonable amount of GCSE science to get the cutoff for that.
    I would highly recommend applying to Imperial. It was so good I'm reapplying!
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    I'd like to introduce what i feel is a classic example of neccesary and sufficient conditions. From my rather weak experience and handling of the BMAT, i have noticed they tend to put in questions to trick one into confusing these critical thinking principals. So, without further adue, i will begin my journey.

    "Every patient with cancer has a low factor of F in their blood"

    "every patient who is free of cancer has a high factor of F in their blood"

    "Every patient who has a high factor of F in their blood has cancer

    "every patient with a high level of factor F in their blood is free of cancer"

    Now, when asked which two statements are equivelant, it is very easy to confuse vital things...i keep making the mistake.

    From the first option, it is certain that if you have cancer, then YOU MUST HAVE a LOW level of factor F.

    BUT, the second statement says, every patient who is free of cancer has a high level of factor F in their blood.
    THIS MEANS, anyone is free of cancer, HAS to have a high level of factor F

    so by asking us which two are "equivelant" what on earth do they mean?/...

    Well, we can dis-regard F, because it contradicts with two of the options, actually, it contradicts with THREE of them so can't be right.

    ...i am still grappling with this

    HANG ON, disregard everything i've said

    if cancer means you have a low level of Factor H, then being free of cancer DOES NOT garuentee you have a 'high' level of factor H. If this were to be true, the statement would go something a long the lines of "If you have a low factor H, then you have cancer"

    Can you see? They play with the words, so let's swap them.

    All banana's are yellow
    All yellow things are banana's?
    NO!

    bad example, but illustrates the point.

    D is reliable. It states, a patient with a high level of factor F MUST be free of cancer! that is only logical. it doesn't say, every patient who is free of cancer has a high level F. you could get non-cancer patients with factor F. but rather, it states that patients with a high level of H, do not have cancer.

    ...it's confusing....but makes sense in the end
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    (Original post by italienmoose)
    There aren't really tips for the BMAT. It's all multiple choice or very short answer questions except the essay. I just went through the official book of questions, which is very short and not particularly useful. You can't really prepare for the critical thinking section as far as I'm concerned, and the science is limited to GCSE stuff. So basically, the first section you'll get whatever you get, and hopefully you can still remember a reasonable amount of GCSE science to get the cutoff for that.
    I would highly recommend applying to Imperial. It was so good I'm reapplying!
    Same, if God wills

    i just want to make the cut'offs, something i'll doubt will happen, if i am to be honest.

    any tips on applying to imperial?

    your ukcat/bmat scores are insane, can you tell me, when you are faced with a diffuclt problem, how do you go about solving it? tell me any steps
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    NEXT - exploiting problem solving skills

    A cheetah top speed = 110kmh
    zebra top speed = 60kmh
    CHEETAH = 100M BEHIND
    how long to catch up

    well...the cheetah runs 50kmh quicker than the zebra.
    speed = distance over time
    distance over speed = time

    you can assume that the cheetah is running 50kmh, and time how long it takes to run 100m
    100m = 0.1km
    0.1/50



    (Original post by italienmoose)
    There aren't really tips for the BMAT. It's all multiple choice or very short answer questions except the essay. I just went through the official book of questions, which is very short and not particularly useful. You can't really prepare for the critical thinking section as far as I'm concerned, and the science is limited to GCSE stuff. So basically, the first section you'll get whatever you get, and hopefully you can still remember a reasonable amount of GCSE science to get the cutoff for that.
    I would highly recommend applying to Imperial. It was so good I'm reapplying!

    how do you divide 0.1 by 50, and get the time taken in seconds, it's page 17 of the bmat book

    ty! if you can try
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    (Original post by BMAT)
    Same, if God wills

    i just want to make the cut'offs, something i'll doubt will happen, if i am to be honest.

    any tips on applying to imperial?

    your ukcat/bmat scores are insane, can you tell me, when you are faced with a diffuclt problem, how do you go about solving it? tell me any steps
    Generally if there's something I'm not sure about, try to narrow done the options and then gut instinct. Don't worry about anything during the tests, it's just a waste of time. And if you do practice tests and fail spectalularly, don't get too worked up about it. They're so far from the actual tests it's ridiculous.

    Imperial's comparatively easy to get an interview at, as long as you meet the cut offs. So, if you think you'll do the BMAT well then it's a pretty good shot.
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    going to analyse every question from section 1, before i attempt the specimen paper
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    (Original post by italienmoose)
    Generally if there's something I'm not sure about, try to narrow done the options and then gut instinct. Don't worry about anything during the tests, it's just a waste of time. And if you do practice tests and fail spectalularly, don't get too worked up about it. They're so far from the actual tests it's ridiculous.

    Imperial's comparatively easy to get an interview at, as long as you meet the cut offs. So, if you think you'll do the BMAT well then it's a pretty good shot.
    logic is not my best point, but i really want to learn, to be able to think of things in a critical way. If i fail the bmat, the skills i'll learn from preparing for it will be worthwhile, even though i will be dissapointed

    are the papers provided really that different?
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    (Original post by BMAT)
    NEXT - exploiting problem solving skills

    how do you divide 0.1 by 50, and get the time taken in seconds, it's page 17 of the bmat book

    ty! if you can try
    0.1km/50kmh^-1

    0.002h

    60 minutes per hour 0.002*60 = 0.12m

    60 seconds per minute 0.12*60 = 7.2s
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    (Original post by BMAT)
    logic is not my best point, but i really want to learn, to be able to think of things in a critical way. If i fail the bmat, the skills i'll learn from preparing for it will be worthwhile, even though i will be dissapointed

    are the papers provided really that different?
    The BMAT ones are fine (the ones on the internet are past papers, although they won't give you a standardised score). The UKCAT ones, however, are very different, especially the 600 questions book which is a lot harder than the actual test.
 
 
 
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